Slavery graphic novel goes to schools to shed light on Scots history

Posted in Articles, History, Media Archive, Slavery, Teaching Resources, United Kingdom on 2018-08-21 03:05Z by Steven

Slavery graphic novel goes to schools to shed light on Scots history

The National
2018-08-09

Kirsteen Paterson

The work is an 'ambitious collaboration' between independent publisher BHP Comics and Glasgow University
The work is an ‘ambitious collaboration’ between independent publisher BHP Comics and Glasgow University

EVERY third year pupil in Scotland is to be schooled on Scotland’s slave past thanks to a new graphic novel.

As many as 12,000 copies of Freedom Bound, which draws from research into slavery in the 1700s, are to be distributed around the country within weeks.

The work is an “ambitious collaboration” between independent publisher BHP Comics and Glasgow University, with illustrations from veteran artist Warren Pleece, whose credits include DC Comics and 2000AD.

The result is 144 pages that tell the stories of three people brought to Scotland to serve white masters…

…Launching the online archive in June, Professor Simon Newman of Glasgow University, who worked on Freedom Bound, said the loss of slave stories from the national memory had been “accidental”, telling The National: “Because there weren’t huge numbers of these people, because they formed relationships with the white population, they just disappeared.

“I suspect there are a good number of us who have African DNA.”

Read the entire article here.

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The Matrix of Race: Social Construction, Intersectionality, and Inequality

Posted in Books, Dissertations, Health/Medicine/Genetics, History, Latino Studies, Law, Media Archive, Monographs, Social Science, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-11-13 02:58Z by Steven

The Matrix of Race: Social Construction, Intersectionality, and Inequality

SAGE Publishing
October 2017
480 pages
ISBN-13: 978-1452202693

Rodney D. Coates, Professor of Global and Intercultural Studies
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

Abby L. Ferber, Professor of Sociology
University of Colorado, Colorado Springs

David L. Brunsma, Professor of Sociology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia

The Matrix of Race: Social Construction, Intersectionality, and Inequality is a textbook that makes race and racial inequality “visible” in new ways to all students in race/ethnic relations courses, regardless of their backgrounds–from minorities who have experienced the impact of race in their own lives to members of dominant groups who might believe that we now live in a “color blind” society. The “matrix” refers to a way of thinking about race that reflects the intersecting, multilayered identities of contemporary society, and the powerful social institutions that shape our understanding of race. Its goals are to help readers get beyond familiar “us vs. them” arguments that can lead to resistance and hostility; promote self-appraisal; and stimulate more productive discussions about race and racism.

Contents

  • PREFACE
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • ABOUT THE AUTHORS
  • PART I. INTRODUCTION TO RACE AND THE SOCIAL MATRIX
    • Chapter 1. Race and the Social Construction of Difference
      • The Social Construction of Race
      • The Social Matrix of Race
      • The Operation of Racism
      • Our Stories
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 2. The Shaping of a Nation: The Social Construction of Race in America
      • Race Today: Adapting and Evolving
      • Indigenous Peoples: The Americas before Columbus
      • Discovery and Encounters: The Shaping of Our Storied Past
      • The U.S. Matrix and Intersectionality— Where Do We Go from Here?
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
  • PART II. THE MATRIX PERSPECTIVE ON SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS
    • Chapter 3. The Social Construction and Regulation of Families
      • Historical Regulation of the Family
      • Family Inequality Theories
      • Family Inequality through the Matrix Lens
      • Transforming the Ideal Family Narrative
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 4. Work and Wealth Inequality
      • Recent Trends in Work and Wealth
      • Theories of Economic Inequality
      • Applying the Matrix to the History of Economic Inequality in the United States
      • Transforming the Story of Race and Economic Inequality
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 5. Health, Medicine, and Health Care
      • Patterns of Inequality in Health and Health Care
      • Theorizing Inequality in Health and Health Care
      • Applying the Matrix to Health Inequity and Inequality
      • Resisting and Transforming Inequality in Health and Health Care
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 6. Education
      • The Shaping of the Matrix of U.S. Education
      • Theories of Education
      • Examining the Concealed Story of Race and Education through the Matrix
      • Alternative Educational Movements and the Future of Education
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 7. Crime, Law, and Deviance
      • A History of Race, Crime, and Punishment
      • Sociological Stock Theories of Crime and Deviance
      • Applying the Matrix to Crime and Deviance
      • Transforming the Narrative of Race, Crime, and Deviance
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 8. Power, Politics, and Identities
      • Contemporary Political Identities
      • Critiquing Sociological Theories of Power, Politics, and Identity
      • Applying the Matrix of Race to U.S. Political History
      • Building Alternatives to the Matrix of Race and Politics
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 9. Sports and the American Dream
      • The State of Sport Today
      • Examining Stock Sociological Theories of Sport
      • Applying the Matrix to Sports in the United States
      • Creating a New Playing Field
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Chapter 10. The Military, War, and Terrorism
      • Class, Gender, and Race in the U.S. Military
      • Military Sociology Stock Theories
      • Applying the Matrix Approach to U.S. Military History, War, and Terrorism
      • A More Inclusive Future
      • Key Terms
      • Chapter Summary
    • Conclusion
  • GLOSSARY
  • REFERENCES
  • INDEX
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Identity Politics of Difference: The Mixed-Race American Indian Experience

Posted in Anthropology, Books, Campus Life, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Native Americans/First Nation, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-10-17 02:36Z by Steven

Identity Politics of Difference: The Mixed-Race American Indian Experience

University Press of Colorado
2017-08-15
168 pages
1 table
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-60732-543-7

Michelle R. Montgomery, Assistant Professor
School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, American Indian Studies, and Ethnic, Gender & Labor Studies
University of Washington, Tacoma

In Identity Politics of Difference, author Michelle R. Montgomery uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine questions of identity construction and multiracialism through the experiences of mixed-race Native American students at a tribal school in New Mexico. She explores the multiple ways in which these students navigate, experience, and understand their racial status and how this status affects their educational success and social interactions.

Montgomery contextualizes students’ representations of their racial identity choices through the compounded race politics of blood quantum and stereotypes of physical features, showing how varying degrees of “Indianness” are determined by peer groups. Based on in-depth interviews with nine students who identify as mixed-race (Native American–White, Native American–Black, and Native American–Hispanic), Montgomery challenges us to scrutinize how the category of “mixed-race” bears different meanings for those who fall under it based on their outward perceptions, including their ability to “pass” as one race or another.

Identity Politics of Difference includes an arsenal of policy implications for advancing equity and social justice in tribal colleges and beyond and actively engages readers to reflect on how they have experienced the identity politics of race throughout their own lives. The book will be a valuable resource to scholars, policy makers, teachers, and school administrators, as well as to students and their families.

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Looking to Teach or Study Mixed Race Studies? Visit MixedRaceStudies.org!

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, My Articles/Point of View/Activities, Teaching Resources on 2017-08-29 03:11Z by Steven

Looking to Teach or Study Mixed Race Studies? Visit MixedRaceStudies.org!

MixedRaceStudies.org
2017-08-01

Steven F. Riley, Creator/Founder

Whether you are a professor finalizing your syllabus for the next semester or just plain curious about the topic of multiracialism, please take a moment to visit MixedRaceStudies.org! With a repository of nearly 12,000 posts that consists of a bibliography of over 1,600 books, over 7,000 articles, and a multitude of other resources, this website is the best resource in the field of mixed-race studies.

MixedRaceStudies.org has been called by a preeminent scholar, “the most comprehensive and objective clearinghouse for scholarly publications related to critical mixed-race theory” and by an up and coming scholar, “probably the singularly most valuable tool in my work.”

Please join the 100,000+ visitors each month who make MixedRaceStudies.org the go-to resource for mixed-race studies!

PS: If you don’t quite have the time to search through the vast number of posts, just spend a few moments checking out some of the fascinating quotes and excerpts from the website to get a small sample of what is available.

Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis & Inuit Issues in Canada

Posted in Anthropology, Books, Canada, History, Media Archive, Monographs, Native Americans/First Nation, Politics/Public Policy, Social Justice, Teaching Resources on 2017-08-27 02:56Z by Steven

Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis & Inuit Issues in Canada

HighWater Press (an imprint of Portage and Main Press)
September 2016
240 pages
Paperback ISBN: 978-1553796800

Chelsea Vowel

Delgamuukw. Sixties Scoop. Bill C-31. Blood quantum. Appropriation. Two-Spirit. Tsilhqot’in. Status. TRC. RCAP. FNPOA. Pass and permit. Numbered Treaties. Terra nullius. The Great Peace

Are you familiar with the terms listed above? In Indigenous Writes, Chelsea Vowel, legal scholar, teacher, and intellectual, opens an important dialogue about these (and more) concepts and the wider social beliefs associated with the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canada. In 31 essays, Chelsea explores the Indigenous experience from the time of contact to the present, through five categories – Terminology of Relationships; Culture and Identity; Myth-Busting; State Violence; and Land, Learning, Law, and Treaties. She answers the questions that many people have on these topics to spark further conversations at home, in the classroom, and in the larger community.

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Embodying the Oppressed and the Oppressor: Critical Mixed Race Studies for Liberation and Social Justice Education

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Dissertations, Media Archive, Social Justice, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-05-03 02:21Z by Steven

Embodying the Oppressed and the Oppressor: Critical Mixed Race Studies for Liberation and Social Justice Education

University of San Francisco
April 2017
71 pages

Gwendlyn C. Snider

A Thesis Presented to The Faculty of the School of Education International and Multicultural Education Department In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Arts in International and Multicultural Education

This study will focus on the educational and social experiences of mixed race Filipinx PEP (Pin@y Educational Partnerships) instructors in the San Francisco/Bay Area and the connection of these various, lived experiences to their teaching pedagogy and praxis in Ethnic Studies curriculum. The main purpose of this research is to create additional evidence for the need of critical mixed race studies and acknowledgement of mixed race students’ unique experiences to be valued and included in Ethnic Studies curriculum. In addition, the research will also serve as reaffirmation of not only the efficacy of Ethnic Studies curriculum but also the need for Ethnic Studies at a national and global level for every student regardless of race or cultural background. This research will also examine the ways in which knowing ourselves in connection to our personal histories, ethnicities, and traditions can not only create a stronger sense of identity but also provide the transformation needed for social justice education and activism. When an individual is able to self-actualize and evolve through education, decolonization, and identity formation, they are potentially in a space where they can utilize this knowledge through education and social justice initiatives to teach youth along with connecting and contributing to their local communities.

By conducting detailed qualitative interviews with mixed race PEP teachers, I aim to further reconcile what it means to be a mixed race Filipinx individual specifically teaching Filipinx history and culture in connection to the larger conceptualization of mixed race identity being integrated into Ethnic Studies curriculum. Through the various experiences of PEP instructors, what does it mean to be a mixed race PEP teacher, teaching Filipinx history while grappling with their own identify formation, and how does that play a role into how they teach? Because of the complex nature of mixed race individual experiences, research suggests that mixed race experiences are not yet fully captured by the existing critical theories because a majority of these theories cater to monoracial identities and realities. This study aims to disrupt and dispel stereotypical notions of race, recognize the lived experiences of mixed race individuals, and push forward Ethnic Studies curriculum for all students at all levels.

Read the entire thesis here.

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Are You Mixed? A War Bride’s Granddaughter’s Narrative of Lives In-Between Contested Race, Gender, Class, and, Power

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Autobiography, Biography, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-04-21 02:37Z by Steven

Are You Mixed? A War Bride’s Granddaughter’s Narrative of Lives In-Between Contested Race, Gender, Class, and, Power

Information Age Publishing
2016-02-05
192 pages
Paperback ISBN: 9781681233871
Hardcover ISBN: 9781681233888
eBook ISBN: 9781681233895

Sonia E. Janis, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Theory and Practice (Social Studies Education)
University of Georgia

In Are You Mixed?, Sonia Janis explores the spaces in-between race and place from the perspective of an educator who is multi-racial. As she reflects on her own experiences as a seventh grade student up to her eventual appointment as a school administrator, she learns of the complexity of situating oneself in predetermined demographic categories. She shares how she explores the intricacies of undefined spaces that teach her to embrace differences, contradictions, and complexities in schools, neighborhoods and communities.

Exploring the in-betweenness (Anzaldua & Keating, 2002; He, 2003, 2010) of her life as a multi-race person problematizes imbedded notions of race, gender, class, and power. The power of this memoir lies in its narrative possibilities to capture the contradictions and paradoxes of lives in-between race and place, “to honor the subtleties, fluidities, and complexities of such experience, and to cultivate understanding towards individual … experience and the multicultural/multiracial contexts that shape and are shaped by such experience” (He, 2003, p. xvii). This memoir creates new ways to think about and write about in-between experience and their relevance to multicultural and multiracial education.

Janis challenges educators, teachers, administrators, and policy makers to view the educational experience of students with multiracial, multicultural, and multilingual backgrounds by shattering predetermined categories and stereotyped classifications and looking into unknown and fluid realms of the in-betweenness of their lives. This challenge helps create equitable and just opportunities and engender culturally responsive and inspiring curricular and learning environments to bring out the best potential in all diverse schools, communities, neighborhoods, tribes and societies.

CONTENTS

  • Acknowledgments
  • Prologue
  • CHAPTER I: One-Half Polish, One-Quarter Russian, One-Quarter Japanese
  • CHAPTER II: My (Non-White or White?) Friends
  • CHAPTER III: Three States and Six Schools
  • CHAPTER IV: Relocating to the Segregated South
  • CHAPTER V: Culturally Clueless
  • CHAPTER VI: Multirace Stories as Curriculum
  • Epilogue
  • Reference
  • About the Author
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Multiracial Identity in Children’s Literature

Posted in Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Monographs, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-03-07 19:03Z by Steven

Multiracial Identity in Children’s Literature

Routledge
2017-02-10
154 pages
Hardback ISBN: 9781138860179
eBook (VitalSource) ISBN: 9781315716725

Amina Chaudhri, Assistant Professor of Teacher Education
Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago

Racially mixed children make up the fastest growing youth demographic in the U.S., and teachers of diverse populations need to be mindful in selecting literature that their students can identify with. This volume explores how books for elementary school students depict and reflect multiracial experiences through text and images. Chaudhri examines contemporary children’s literature to demonstrate the role these books play in perpetuating and resisting stereotypes and the ways in which they might influence their readers. Through critical analysis of contemporary children’s fiction, Chaudhri highlights the connections between context, literature, and personal experience to deepen our understanding of how children’s books treat multiracial identity.

Contents

  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Multiracial Identity in the United States: Historical and Current Discourse
  • 3. Multiracial Picturebooks
  • 4. In/Visibility: The Legacy of Pathology in Contemporary Fiction
  • 5. Multiracial Blending: The Post-Racial Myth in Contemporary Fiction
  • 6. Multiracial Awareness: Power and Visibility In Contemporary Fiction
  • 7. Voices of the Past: Multiracial Identity in Historical Fiction
  • 8. Hidden Identities: Whiteness and Passing
  • 9. Teaching and Learning with Multiracial Fiction
  • Appendices
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Henry Ossawa Tanner papers, 1860s-1978, bulk 1890-1937

Posted in Arts, Biography, Media Archive, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-03-06 21:14Z by Steven

Henry Ossawa Tanner papers, 1860s-1978, bulk 1890-1937

Smithsonian Archives of American Art
Washington, D.C.
2007

Tanner, Henry Ossawa, 1859-1937
Painter, Photographer, Educator, Illustrator

The papers of Henry Ossawa Tanner in the Archives of American Art were digitized in 2007. The papers have been scanned in their entirety, and total 2,471 images.

The collection was fully digitized in 2007 as part of the Terra Foundation for American Art Digitization Grant…

For more information, click here.

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An Octoroon: Education Guide

Posted in Arts, History, Media Archive, Passing, Reports, Teaching Resources, United States on 2017-02-09 20:36Z by Steven

An Octoroon: Education Guide

The Wilma Theater
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
2016
27 pages

Anne Holmes, Education Director
Lizzy Pecora, Education Assistant

BY Branden Jacobs-Jenkins
DIRECTED BY Joanna Settle
March 16 – April 10, 2016

Introduction

A NOTE FROM THE EDUCATION DIRECTOR

Thank you for choosing to bring your students to the Wilma’s production of An Octoroon, by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins. I applaud your willingness to take a risk on this one. While on some level we all understand that the most extraordinary learning opportunities emerge when we venture outside our comfort zone, most of us still gravitate toward what’s familiar and safe. An Octoroon promises to be a powerful catalyst for discussions around race, identity and stereotypes; if there’s a more urgent conversation we should be having with young people at this moment, I don’t know what that is. Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins has written a smart, intricately layered text to propel these discussions. Director Joanna Settle adds a live seven-piece band, with an original score composed in the rehearsal room alongside the actors, and dynamic step infused choreography to create a theatrical event big enough to encompass such a play. This is a risk worth taking.

If the Wilma were producing Dion Boucicault’s The Octoroon, the original 1859 melodrama upon which Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ play is based, I would have a much tougher time arguing for its value in a high school classroom today. While Boucicault is still considered one of the great writers of the 19th century melodrama, there are so many cringe worthy moments throughout the play that it can feel like a minefield of political incorrectness. Similar questions have been raised about the value of reading Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in 2016. I believe those concerns have validity and ignoring them would be irresponsible. What is it then about Branden Jacobs-Jenkins’ An Octoroon that makes it different, particularly given that the playwright has preserved so much of Boucicault’s original text? The crucial difference is that Jacobs-Jenkins provides a meta-theatrical lens through which to view the play, forcing us to consider a contemporary critical perspective on what we are seeing and hearing. Beyond that, he never tells us what to think or feel, leaving us to navigate our own way through this unsettling play. At times it feels like an irreverent romp, delighting in its own theatricality and celebrating the craftsmanship of the great 19th century melodramas. There are moments when we can’t help but laugh and yet we’re not sure if laughing is really okay. In many ways, An Octoroon is so suited to the classroom because it repeatedly eschews easy answers, all the way up through the final moments of the play’s deliberate non-ending.

In this education guide we tried to focus on providing key historical background on Boucicault and his original melodrama, as well as introducing you to this astounding, two-time Obie Award Winning Playwright (Best New American Play for An Octoroon and Appropriate) Branden Jacobs-Jenkins. BJJ’s character breakdown page as well as Boucicault’s plot breakdown page should help with getting clarity on the basics. With this play in particular, Lizzy Pecora and I both found ourselves repeatedly drawn back to the written, video and podcast interviews with Branden Jacobs-Jenkins because we really wanted to hear from the playwright himself as much as possible. We’ve included most of our favorite links to those interviews in the appendix, but I would leave these for after your students have already seen or read the play, so as not to clutter their experience of it with too much imposed meaning. The In the Classroom section includes our suggestions for introducing the play with interactive lessons designed to engage students in discussion and get them making their own predictions about its content and themes.

Thanks again for agreeing to go on this ride with us. Your students are going to love you for it!…

Read the entire guide here.

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