Call for papers for the special issue of The Journal of Early Adolescence: “Biracial, Multiracial, and Multiethnic Adolescents”

Posted in Family/Parenting, Forthcoming Media, Identity Development/Psychology, Social Science, Social Work, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-08-10 03:13Z by Steven

Call for papers for the special issue of The Journal of Early Adolescence: “Biracial, Multiracial, and Multiethnic Adolescents”

Editor in Chief: Alexander T. Vazsonyi
University of Kentucky

Guest Editors: Adrienne Nishina and Melissa Witkow

Because of their ethnic/racial ambiguity, multiethnic youth (youth from more than one ethnic/racial background) are still sometimes ignored in developmental research. Yet, by the year 2060, multiethnic youth are projected to comprise almost 10% of the total youth population in the United States, rendering subsample deletion impractical.

The Journal of Early Adolescence invites papers that explicitly examine early adolescents from multiethnic/multiracial backgrounds. We are particularly interested in papers that use a variety of methods to identify these youth. As such, papers should include clear descriptions of how multiethnic/multiracial status was identified, and why a particular method was chosen.

In terms of content, papers can be methodological or descriptive in focus – for example, providing and assessing conceptual frameworks on how and when to classify multiethnic youth as their own group as opposed to a different classification. Papers can also be process-oriented (e.g., how better understanding multiethnic youth can help the field understand more basic developmental processes related to ethnicity). In this respect, papers can focus solely on multiethnic youth, or it can be comparative in nature.

All papers should include a section labeled “Practical Recommendations” in the discussion that provides recommendations for researchers moving forward, as well as the rationale on which these recommendations are based.

Authors of potential submissions can contact Adrienne Nishina (anishina@ucdavis.edu) or Melissa Witkow (mwitkow@willamette.edu) if they have questions about the suitability of their study for this special issue.

Submissions for this special issue are due December 15, 2018.

Submit your manuscript today: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/earlyadolescence

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‘Two or More’: Would you listen to a podcast about multiracial issues?

Posted in Articles, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-08-10 03:12Z by Steven

‘Two or More’: Would you listen to a podcast about multiracial issues?

Lindsey Leake, Multimedia Journalist
American University, Washington, D.C.

2018-08-03

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Hello! My name is Lindsey Leake (@NewsyLindsey) and I’m a graduate journalism student at American University in Washington, D.C. I’m considering launching a podcast called “Two or More,” focusing on issues that multiracial Americans and their families face as the country’s racial and ethnic makeup becomes increasingly diverse. Above all, I want to learn about and tell the stories of other multiracial individuals like myself.

The questions will help me understand my potential audience and gauge the interest level for “Two or More.” Thank you for taking a few minutes to assist with my research!

Please respond to the questionnaire here.

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Seeking Multiracial Americans or Brazilian Residing in the United States for Research Study

Posted in Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-06-26 23:15Z by Steven

Seeking Multiracial Americans or Brazilian Residing in the United States for Research Study

Ariane Y. Kreidl, Student ETS Academic Advisor; USC TRiO; Educational Talent Search
Business Administration 19’
USC Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California

My name is Ariane Kreidl and I am research scholar at the University of Southern California (USC). I am seeking participants for a research study about race. This research aims to understand racial norms through a comparative analysis of biracial/multiracial Americans and Brazilians individuals living in the United States.

Eligibility criteria. Participants must be one of the following:

  • Biracial/multiracial Americans (i.e., individuals who have mixed ancestry of two-or-more races)
  • Brazilians living in the United States for at least three (3) years.

There are two (2) ways to participate:

  1. Online Survey (Qualtrics)a: Closed-ended questions related to the research topic. The estimated response time is approximately 20 minutes. Participants will have the opportunity to enter a drawing to win a $50 Amazon/Visa Gift Card.
  2. Interview in-person or via Skypeb: Open-ended questions related to the research topic. Interview will last between 30-75 minutes. Participants will have the opportunity to enter a drawing to win a $100 Amazon/Visa Gift Card! (This interview block is limited to only 20 participants).

Participation is completely anonymous.

Thank you for considering this research invitation.

aIf you are interested, please click on the link for the survey: Qualitrics.Survey.Akreidl.
bIf you are interested, please click on the following link to select a date and time: Research.Interview.Appt.Slots.

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Creative Producer, Passing by Indigo Griffiths

Posted in Arts, Law, Media Archive, Passing, United Kingdom, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-03-24 20:26Z by Steven

Creative Producer, Passing by Indigo Griffiths

Arts Jobs
Arts Council England
March 2018

Closes: 2018-03-26
Location: London, England
Type: Part-Time
Salary: Paid (£10k-15k pro rata)
Artform: Theater
Contact: Gemma Aked-Priestley and Indigo Griffiths

Description

Chicago. 1941. Joey, John and Eliza are siblings but their lives are about to take different paths. Joey is embracing the New Negro Movement, John is breaking barriers at college and Eliza is preparing to pass as white. In a world where everything is determined by race, what can you gain by concealing who you are, and more importantly what can you lose?

Passing is a new play by Indigo Griffiths exposing the controversial practice of “racial passing” – the use of skin colour as social currency.

In August 2017 the project undertook Arts Council funded R&D at the Nuffield Southampton Theatres, culminating in an industry sharing at The Bunker. A rehearsed reading will take place on Wednesday 14th March in collaboration with Women@RADA: https://www.rada.ac.uk/whats-on/playreadings

The Creative Producer will lead a fundraising campaign, support budgeting, marketing, the formation of the creative team and be involved with all aspects of the production. Fee is funding dependant but will be in line with ITC recommended rates. Creative meetings will begin in May 2018 for a Spring 2019 production.

Gemma’s directing credits include Gracie (Finborough Theatre) Grimm: An Untold Tale (Underbelly, Edinburgh Festival) and Tender Napalm (Karamel Club). She is the Assistant Director for The Mono Box. Assistant Direction includes Sam Hodges on the world premiere of Howard Brenton’s The Shadow Factory (Nuffield Southampton Theatres) and Daniel Goldman on Thebes Land (Arcola). She is the recipient of bursaries from the Mayflower Theatre, Barker-Mill Foundation and JMK Trust.

Indigo’s Writing credits include The Mulatto Girl (Nuffield Theatre Lab) and Passing (The Bunker/The Pleasance). She is a member of the Papatango Writers Course 2017-18 and in 2018 completed An Introduction to Screenwriting course (University of East Anglia). Indigo’s focus is on exploring unheard female voices and the mixed-race narrative. She is currently working on a trilogy of plays that explore mixed race heritage (Passing, The Mulatto Girl and The Island.)

Please send a CV and short letter of interest to Gemma.aked-priestley@hotmail.co.uk/ indigo.griffiths@hotmail.co.uk.

For more information, click here.

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Asian, White, multiethnic, multiracial, mixed-race, interracial, biracial!

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-03-24 00:45Z by Steven

Asian, White, multiethnic, multiracial, mixed-race, interracial, biracial!

2018-03-22

Michele Chan, Master Candidate
Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Do any of these labels resonate with you? If so, maybe you would like to participate in a research study about multiracial Asian Americans.

We are seeking participants to participate in a study about the experiences of multiracial Asian Americans. In order to participate, we ask that you are:

  1. Aged 18 to aged 44
  2. Currently live in the U.S.
  3. Have one biological parent who is racially White and another biological parent who is racially Asian

We are very interested in hearing about your unique experiences as an individual with both Asian and White heritages.

Please consider completing our short, online survey, which will take no more than 30 minutes to finish. To take the survey, click here.

In return for your participation, you may choose to enter into a drawing to win a $20 dollar gift card to Target.

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to the investigators:

Thank you.

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Seeking Participants for Study Examining Influences on the Racial Identity and Mental Health of Self-Identified Multiracial People

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2018-01-30 02:39Z by Steven

Seeking Participants for Study Examining Influences on the Racial Identity and Mental Health of Self-Identified Multiracial People

Georgia State University
College of Education & Human Development
Counseling and Psychological Services
2018-01-24

Marisa Franco, Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology

Participants are wanted for a study examining influences on the racial identity and mental health of self-identified multiracial people.

Anyone who identifies as multiracial and is over the age of 18 can participate. Up to 1,000 people will participate in this study. All participants will have the option of being entered into a raffle to receive one of three $25 gift cards.

The survey is administered on an online platform called Qualtrics. Participation in the study is expected to take up to 30 minutes.

To participate, click here.

The research will not provide direct benefits to you but it will benefit the scientific community through increasing awareness of race-related experiences and well-being for multiracial people.

Participation is confidential and participants may withdraw from the study at any time.

For further information, contact the principal investigator at: mfranco@gsu.edu.

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Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) Activist?

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers, Women on 2018-01-06 21:15Z by Steven

Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) Activist?

Alliant International University, San Francisco
2018-01-04

Brittany Cooper, Ph.D. Candidate in Clinical Psychology
California School of Professional Psychology
Alliant International University, San Francisco, California

Win a $50 Visa Gift Card!

Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) woman?

We want to learn more about how you use your voice as an activist!

You are invited to participate in a study about Biracial women’s identity and activist expression. If you are at least 18 years old, we would like to hear your thoughts in confidential interviews. Your participation can place you in a raffle for a chance to win a $50 Visa Gift Card!

To participate, please contact: biracialactiviststudy@gmail.com.

If you have any questions or concerns about this study please contact B. Cooper, MA, Alliant International University, at: biracialactiviststudy@gmail.com.

Approved by Alliant International University Institutional Review Board.

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Call for Essays: Shades of Prejudice: Asian American Women on Colorism in America from NYU Press, Edited by Nikki Khanna (Forthcoming 2018)

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Autobiography, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers, Women on 2017-10-17 02:34Z by Steven

Call for Essays: Shades of Prejudice: Asian American Women on Colorism in America from NYU Press, Edited by Nikki Khanna (Forthcoming 2018)

Nikki Khanna, Associate Professor of Sociology
University of Vermont
Department of Sociology
31 South Prospect Street
Burlington, Vermont 05405
Telephone: (802) 656-2162

2017-07-06

DEADLINE: Manuscripts will be accepted on a rolling basis, though the final deadline is OCTOBER 31, 2017.

I am pleased to announce an open submission call for my forthcoming anthology from New York University Press, SHADES OF PREJUDICE, a collection of essays written by Asian American women about their personal experiences with colorism.

Colorism is the practice of discrimination whereby light skin is privileged over dark, and is a global issue affecting racial groups worldwide. Colorism exists is just about every part of Asia and affects Asian diasporas, including most Asian American communities—including those descended from Southeast Asia (e.g., India, Pakistan, Cambodia, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, and Indonesia), but also those from Japan, China, and other parts of Eastern Asia.

I am looking for Asian American women (including multiracial American women with Asian ancestry) to share their personal experiences with colorismhow has your skin shade (and other “racialized” physical features like eye color, eye shape, and other facial features) influenced your life?

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

  • Submissions should be sent to: nkhanna@uvm.edu (in the subject heading, please type in all-caps: SHADES OF PREJUDICE SUBMISSION)
  • Please send your personal narrative as a Microsoft® Word document and label your document: “LASTNAME_FIRSTNAME.doc.”
  • Essays should be approximately 1,000-2,500 words, double-spaced, and Times New Roman font.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nikki Khanna is an associate professor of Sociology at the University of Vermont and has written extensively on issues regarding race. You can read more about the author here: www.nikkikhanna.com and http://www.uvm.edu/sociology/faculty/faculty_bios/Khanna/.

HERE ARE SOME IDEAS OF QUESTIONS THAT YOU MAY WANT TO ADDRESS:

  • What do you consider (physically) beautiful and why? Where does your image of beauty come from? (family, friends, media, or somewhere else?)
  • What is the importance of skin shade in your Asian ethnic community and how has this affected your life? For example, has it had an effect on dating or finding a mate? Has it influenced your interactions or relationships with family members or others? Has it affected any of your life opportunities? (job, education, etc.?).
  • How did you learn that light skin was preferred over dark skin in your Asian ethnic community? Can you provide specific examples?
  • Have you personally benefitted from having light skin? If so, how so? Is there a particular experience that you can share?
  • How have your family, community, peers, friends, media or others reinforced the stereotype that light skin is somehow more desirable than dark skin?
  • Have you felt pressure to use products designed to lighten or whiten your skin? If yes, why and what types of products? What has your experiences been with these products? How do you feel about whitening products?
  • Have you tried any other means to lighten or change the shade of your skin?
  • Have you felt pressure from your ethnic community or larger American society to conform to particular beauty standards? How so? Explain.
  • Have you struggled with, resisted, or actively challenged the “light is beautiful” message? How so?
  • Have other physical/facial characteristics (those that are often related to race) had an influence on your life (e.g., your eye color, eye shape, nose shape)?
  • Have you felt pressure to surgically alter any of your physical features to conform to a particular beauty standard in your Asian ethnic community or in larger American society (e.g., eyelid surgery)? Explain.
  • Do you think light skin is seen as desirable because some people desire to look/be white, because light skin is related to social class or caste, or to something else? Why? What in your personal life has informed the way you explain why light skin is considered more desirable than dark?
  • Do you think the impact of your skin color on your life is influenced by other factors – such as your gender, social class/caste, ethnic group, generation, or other factors? For example, do you think skin color more so affects women than men? Why or why not? Do you think that your experiences are similar or different to male family members or men in your Asian ethnic community? Do you think your generation (whether you are 1st, 2nd, 3rd or later generation Asian American) has influenced the importance of skin color in your life?
  • Did growing up in America challenge or reinforce the idea that light skin is better than dark? How so? Could you share a particular example? Relatedly, how have American beauty standards affected your vision of what is considered beautiful and how does this related to beauty standards in your ethnic community? Are those standards complementary or contradictory?

For more information, click here.

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Study Participants Needed: Multiracial Identity Development and Integration: Family Socialization and Group Heterogeneity

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2017-10-08 03:51Z by Steven

Study Participants Needed: Multiracial Identity Development and Integration: Family Socialization and Group Heterogeneity

Sean C. Pereira, M.S., Clinical Psychology Doctoral Candidate
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology
Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, California

2017-09-24

Research is currently being conducted at Palo Alto University on racial identity, heritage, and development. If you are between the ages of 18 to 45, know your parents’ racial identity, and are a United States resident, please consider participating in this anonymous study by clicking on the link below and taking the 20- to 25-minute survey.

You are welcome to direct any questions to spereira@paloaltou.edu.

To take the survey, click here.

Thank you in advance for your time.

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Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference 2018: Resisting, Reclaiming, and Reimagining (Call for Papers)

Posted in Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2017-08-18 18:56Z by Steven

Critical Mixed Race Studies Conference 2018: Resisting, Reclaiming, and Reimagining (Call for Papers)

March 1-3, 2018 at the University of Maryland, College Park
Deadline: August 18, 2017
Notification: Early September 2017

Conference Description: Resisting, Reclaiming, and Reimagining, the next Critical Mixed Race Studies conference seeks to highlight resistance against white supremacy around the globe, the reclamation of community, kinship, and identity within the mixed-race community, and the reimagining of racial difference. The conference will be hosted at the University of Maryland, March 1-3 2018 and will include film screenings and a live performance showcase produced by Mixed Roots Stories. Recent events demonstrate that white supremacy, coupled with sexism, xenophobia, transphobia, homophobia, and unchecked capitalism, is still central as an organizing principle and tool of domination. For example, borders and walls (both real and imagined) are being invoked by the current United States administration to marginalize people and combat the inevitable demographic shifts which will see this country become majority minority. By focusing on the resistance, reclamation, and reimagination of multiraciality, this interdisciplinary and transnational conference will be a forum dedicated to fostering relationships between people of color, dismantling racial hierarchies, and affirming an ethics of love to subvert dominant paradigms of social identity.

Proposals: CMRS welcomes submissions from scholars from all fields, cultural workers, and activists and invites posters, panels, roundtables, and individual papers that address the conference theme in a broad sense. Presentation formats may be varied and diverse, and we welcome proposals that involve poetry, visual art, storytelling, and other non-academic formats. Although not limited to these examples, proposals might explore the following:

  • A proposal from the social sciences might describe epistemological frameworks that center multiraciality and reclaim the heterogeneity of the mixed experience.
  • In the humanities, presenters might share how dominant cultures drive cultural norms and how this informs the global mixed experience.
  • Community activists and/or scholars engaged with the public may share how social justice work operates between and across minority communities.
  • Historians might explore legacies of revolution and resistance shaping the mixed experience in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and beyond.
  • Artists may share important works that decenter whiteness and reimagine social norms of identity.

IMPORTANT: Presenters at the conference must be members of the CMRS Association. Membership must be renewed annually and is available here. Presenters must be available to present on any of the 3 days of the conference.

Members of the CMRS Program Committee will be reviewing abstracts based upon the quality of the proposal. UMD class/meeting rooms are equipped with a Dell laptop, microphone and projector. Mac laptop users will need to provide their own projection adapters. Please note that all abstracts are to be submitted online using the CMRS form located here.

For more information, see our website. Contact us at: cmrsmixedrace@gmail.com

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