Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) Activist?

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers, Women on 2018-01-06 21:15Z by Steven

Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) Activist?

Alliant International University, San Francisco
2018-01-04

Brittany Cooper, Ph.D. Candidate in Clinical Psychology
California School of Professional Psychology
Alliant International University, San Francisco, California

Win a $50 Visa Gift Card!

Do you identify as a Biracial (Black and White) woman?

We want to learn more about how you use your voice as an activist!

You are invited to participate in a study about Biracial women’s identity and activist expression. If you are at least 18 years old, we would like to hear your thoughts in confidential interviews. Your participation can place you in a raffle for a chance to win a $50 Visa Gift Card!

To participate, please contact: biracialactiviststudy@gmail.com.

If you have any questions or concerns about this study please contact B. Cooper, MA, Alliant International University, at: biracialactiviststudy@gmail.com.

Approved by Alliant International University Institutional Review Board.

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Multiple Voices: Racial and Ethnic Socialization Within Interracial Asian and White Families

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Dissertations, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2012-12-03 19:33Z by Steven

Multiple Voices: Racial and Ethnic Socialization Within Interracial Asian and White Families

Alliant International University, San Francisco
2012
138 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3517943
ISBN: 9781267486448

Sarah Kasuga-Jenks

Presented to the Faculty of The California School of Professional Psychology San Francisco Campus Alliant International University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology

The current study focuses on racial and ethnic socialization in Asian and White interracial families. A qualitative study was conducted to examine ways in which parents communicate issues of race and ethnicity to their children. Narrative inquiry was utilized to access the lived experiences of members of interracial families. First, parents were interviewed; then, the entire family was interviewed together and finally, the entire family had the opportunity to review transcripts and results. Family stories were the main unit of analysis; family stories from the parent interview were examined in addition to family stories from the family interview. The guiding research questions included: How do individuals within interracial Asian and White families communicate with each other (e.g., do they use verbal or non-verbal styles and are they more proactive or reactive)? How do parents communicate issues of race and ethnicity (e.g., racial and ethnic identity, participation in cultural events, cultural values, discrimination, etc.) to their children?

Four themes emerged from the interviews: cultural practices, effects of interpersonal relationships, experiences of discrimination, and negotiating identity. Parents utilized a range of techniques, verbal and non-verbal, to communicate issues related to race and ethnicity. Responses varied in terms of which parent culture was emphasized and by whom. Many families did not report actively “socializing” their children about race and ethnicity, but incorporated cultural lessons into daily life as a way of communicating their cultural heritage to their children. Significant differences in terms of communication with children about race and ethnicity based on generational status of parents were not found.

Implications of this study include a better understanding of an understudied population, as well as potentially shaping the way in which socialization is understood in less traditional families (e.g., interracial families). Results from this study help to inform future research focused on interracial families, and specific recommendations for future work are made. Clinically, the results from this study provide practitioners with more information about interracial families to help guide interventions. The current study also contributes to theory on ethnic and racial socialization in interracial families as both parents and children were interviewed.

Purchase the dissertation here.

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The Process of Forming a Multiracial Identity for Persons of Three or More Races

Posted in Dissertations, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2012-11-21 21:56Z by Steven

The Process of Forming a Multiracial Identity for Persons of Three or More Races

Alliant International University, San Diego, California
2012
197 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3524119
ISBN: 9781267582935

Maria Reyna Fowlks

A PsyD Clinical Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University San Diego In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree Doctor of Psychology

The number of multiracial individuals (MRIs) in the United States continues to grow. As this number continues to grow, it is likely there will be an increase in MRIs of three or more races. However, the literature has not specifically looked at the experiences and process of forming a racial identity development of individuals of three or more races. This qualitative study based on grounded theory aimed to do this. Twelve MRIs were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Ten themes and 34 subthemes emerged from the data and were deemed significant to the participants’ experiences and development. Themes included: parental influences on racial identity; varied extended family messages, dynamics, and relations; cultural and geographic influences on racial identity; development of racial awareness; wanting to fit in; getting teased and discriminated against; dealing with other people’s questions and assumptions; discovery and development of one’s racial identity; being mixed has had a positive impact on life; and ways to address race and being multiracial with children. Results indicated the process of developing a multiracial identity is complex with many factors interacting and influencing one’s racial identity. A proposed model is presented integrating the findings from this study to describe the experiences and multiracial identity development process for MRIs of three or more races. Finally, clinical implications, limitations of the study, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Purchase the dissertation here.

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A critical ethnography of biracial elementary teachers: Biracial identity development and its effect on teaching practices and racism prevention

Posted in Dissertations, Media Archive, Teaching Resources, United States on 2011-11-21 19:24Z by Steven

A critical ethnography of biracial elementary teachers: Biracial identity development and its effect on teaching practices and racism prevention

Alliant International University, San Diego
2010
480 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3428767
ISBN: 9781124269009

Jon E. Kingsbury

A Dissertation Presented to the Graduate Faculty of the Hufstedler School of Education Alliant International University In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Education

The purpose of this qualitative inquiry was to develop a critical ethnographic methodology to examine the experiences that led a select group of elementary teachers to self-identify as biracial. Additionally, through the use of critical systems analysis, this inquiry explored the perspectives of the informants with regard to racism at the classroom and the greater school or district levels. In order to collect data, in-depth phenomenological interviews were conducted with two self-identified biracial elementary teachers from the southern California area. These interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. This inquiry sought to create an interview structure that would ensure a critical ethnographic approach to data generation that resulted in the development of the Figure Eight Interview Model, wherein the research process is dominated by two distinct research settings. The first is where the researcher and the informant are working collaboratively during the actual interviews. The second setting is where the researcher and the informant are working independently, using grounded theory to critically analyze the data transcribed from the previous interview. The analyses were then discussed at the next interview, where thematic categories were developed. These two settings were repeated three times, with each interview building on the previous and becoming more focused. Using system and social integration levels of critical systems analysis, themes were uncovered in order to develop theory for addressing, reducing, and ultimately preventing racism in classrooms and schools. These themes, along with the Figure Eight Interview Model, can be refined and expanded through further research done by professional development planners, multicultural educators, and qualitative researchers.

Table of Contents

  • LIST OF FIGURES
  • 1 . INTRODUCTION
    • Purpose of the Study
    • Significance of the Study
    • Assumptions of the Study
    • Delimitations of the Study
    • My View of Humanity and Racism
  • 2. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
    • Racial Identity Development
      • Introduction
      • Monoracial Identity Models
      • Biracial Identity Models
      • Racial Identity Development and Teachers
      • Comments on Review of Racial Identity Models
    • Teachers’ Biographies
      • Perspectives on Teachers’ Biographies
      • Development of Teachers’ Biographies
      • Purpose and Value of Teachers’ Biographies
    • Multicultural Education
      • History and Development of Multicultural Education
      • Definitions and Goals
      • Teachers’ Role in Multicultural Education
    • Conclusions From the Review of the Literature
    • Research Questions in Light of the Literature Review
  • 3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
    • Research Paradigms
    • Critical Ethnography
      • Sociohistorical Development
      • Conceptual and Philosophical Framework
      • Feminist Methodology
      • Critical Theory
    • Research Design of the Study
      • In-Depth Phenomenological Interviewing
      • Sampling Strategy
      • Selection of Informants
      • Content and Conduct of the Interviews
      • Data Analysis
      • Carspecken’s Stages for Critical Research
      • Data Generation and Data Management
      • My Role as Researcher
      • Trustworthiness
  • 4. ASSESSING THE RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
    • Procedural Aspects of the Study
      • Number of Informants
      • Commitment of Time
      • Use of Instruments
      • Components of the Data Analysis
      • Summary of Procedural Aspects
    • Theoretical Concerns Within Critical Ethnography
      • Empowerment
      • Contextualization of Data
      • Romanticism
      • Validity/Trustworthiness
      • Summary of Theoretical Concerns
    • Criteria Within the Figure Eight Interview Model
      • The First Interview
      • The Second Interview
      • The Third Interview
      • Summary
  • 5. MY ANALYSIS AND RESPONSES TO THE STUDY
    • The Research Questions
      • Research Question 1
      • Research Question 2
      • Research Question 3
      • Research Question 4
      • Research Question 5
    • My Summary of Our Study
      • Assessment of the Methodology
  • 6. INFORMANTS’ RESPONSES TO OUR STUDY
    • Opening Comments/General Discussion
    • Time and Reflection Process I
    • Number of Participants
    • Length of Interviews
    • API Scores
    • Time and Reflection Process II
    • Role of Family
    • Self-identification Statements
    • Sociohistorical Context
    • Theoretical Elements
    • Empowerment of Informants
    • Time and Reflection Process III
    • Asian Pacific Islanders Educators Association
    • Their Mothers’ Influence
    • Weddings and Extended Families
    • Their Mothers as “Victims”
    • My Error in Identifying a Relationship
    • Regional Cultural Differences
    • Changes in Biracial Demographics
    • Their Physical Ambiguity
    • The Use of the Word “Threat”
    • School and Community Cultures
    • “Addressing” Versus “Reducing and Preventing”
    • Institutional Racism
    • San Diego’s Blueprint for Success
    • Changes in the American Culture
    • Truthfulness in My Re-Presentation
    • Stages of Biracial Identity Development
    • Closing Comments
    • Analysis of Informants’ Responses
      • Research Process
      • Critical REID Factors
      • Their Mothers’ Influence
      • Empowerment
      • Institutional Racism
      • Sociohistorical Contextualization
      • Hierarchy of Racism
    • Summary
  • 7. SUMMARY CHAPTER
    • Research Findings
    • Research Questions
    • Possible Shortcomings
      • Focus of Study
      • Peer Debriefers
    • Figure Eight Interview Model
      • Theoretical Foundations
      • Figure Eight Interview Model’s Effectiveness
      • Summary: Figure Eight Interview Model
    • Critical Ethnography
      • Empowerment
      • Data Contextualization
      • Catalytic Validity
      • Validity/Trustworthiness
      • Summary
    • Ethical Implications of an Organic Inquiry
    • Developmental Biracial REID Model
    • Implications and Applications for Practice
      • Professional Educators
      • Qualitative Researchers
    • Personal Reflections
  • REFERENCES CITED
  • APPENDICES
    • A. SELF-IDENTIFICATION OF RACIAL IDENTITY STATEMENT
    • B. FAMILY HERITAGE WORKSHEET (FIGURE B1)
    • C. WRITTEN CONSENT FORM
    • D. SUGGESTIONS FOR REFLECTIVE JOURNAL WRITING
    • E. PERSONAL HISTORY OF IDENTITY WORKSHEET (FIGURE E1)
    • F. SUGGESTIONS FOR ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTS
    • G. SUGGESTIONS FOR COMMENTS ON INTERVIEWER’S ANALYSIS
    • H. CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS HANDOUT
    • I. POEM: “I AM INVISIBLE”
    • J. INFORMANTS’ REFERENCE SHEET

List of Figures

  1. Racial/ethnic identity development models
  2. Moments of ethnography
  3. Conceptual Figure Eight Interview Model
  4. Procedural Figure Eight Interview Model
  5. List of established interview questions
  6. Five stages for critical qualitative research
  7. Interpretation of Carspecken’s (1996) research design
  8. Summary of responses to research questions
  9. Biracial identity development continuum

Purchase the dissertation here.

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Biracial and Biethnic Identity Development in Vietnamese/Caucasian Adults

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Dissertations, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2011-09-09 21:04Z by Steven

Biracial and Biethnic Identity Development in Vietnamese/Caucasian Adults

Alliant International University, San Francisco Bay
May 2011
75 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3467139
ISBN: 9781124783406

Tien Vu

A Clinical Dissertation Proposal Presented to the Faculty of The California School of Professional Psychology, San Francisco Bay Campus Alliant International University

The current study explored factors that contribute to Vietnamese/White biracial identity. Three interview participants who were raised in the United States experienced less racism and discrimination than the two interviewees raised overseas. All of the participants currently have healthy and strong biracial and biethnic identity development. These findings suggest that Vietnamese/White individuals are more resilient and are more likely to have healthy outcomes than previous research has suggested.

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Acknowledgements
  • I. Introduction
  • II. Literature Review
    • Ethnic Identity Research
    • Biracial People
    • Asian-American Immigration
    • Biracial Asian-Americans
    • Vietnamese Immigration to the United States
    • Vietnamese Biracial Individuals
  • III. Methods
  • IV. Results
  • V. Discussion
  • VI. Implications
  • References
  • Appendix A: Research Study Flyer
  • Appendix B: Script of Subject Screening
  • Appendix C: Consent Form
  • Appendix D: Background Information Form
  • Appendix E: Interview Guide
  • Appendix F: Follow-Up Phone Script

Purchase the dissertation here.

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Biracial identity development in minority/minority individuals: A relational model

Posted in Dissertations, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive on 2011-02-08 00:16Z by Steven

Biracial identity development in minority/minority individuals: A relational model

Alliant International University, San Francisco Bay
May 2009
383 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3358398
ISBN: 9781109176018

Michelle Grady

There are a growing number of biracial individuals in America, and while some studies have examined their experiences, few have focused on the experiences of biracial minority, minority individuals, whose parents are from different racial minority groups. This study qualitatively explored, through the use of in-depth interviews, the biracial identity development experiences of 6 biracial minority, minority individuals, between the ages of 25 and 34. Interview questions were informed by the literature on biracial identity development, in particular a previous study by Kich (1982), and by Josselson’s (1992) relational theory of identity development. Transcripts were used to create a biography for each respondent; the biographies were analyzed to identify themes and factors influencing biracial identity development. A major theme which emerged included respondents’ tendencies, in childhood, to develop a stronger racial identification with the side of the family they felt more emotionally connected to. Over the course of the respondents’ lives, conflicts about identity emerged and receded, in response to environmental and relational experiences. Relationships with peers and extended family members evoked an awareness of being racially different in respondents. Peer acceptance or rejection strongly influenced respondents’ biracial identity development both positively and negatively during their childhood and adolescence. A relational model of biracial identity development was proposed which was based on themes that emerged, as respondents described their identity development. Stages of biracial identity development were characterized by a search for a sense of belonging, acceptance, and validation, as well as, over time, an increased need for self-definition and consolidation of personal identity. Respondents experienced racism, rejection, and subjective experiences of being different. Acceptance from peers and extended family, communication with family members about their biracial experience, and being taught about both cultures, were longed for experiences that seemed to contribute to a positive experience of identity, when they occurred. Recommendations for future research include further exploration of the usefulness of Josselson’s relational identity development theory for understanding biracial identity development.

Purchase the dissertation here.

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