British Women Writers and the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1785-1835

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Monographs, United Kingdom, Women on 2015-11-29 21:20Z by Steven

British Women Writers and the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1785-1835

Ashgate Publishing
November 2014
160 pages
234 x 156 mm
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-4724-3088-5
eBook PDF ISBN: 978-1-4724-3089-2
eBook ePUB ISBN: 978-1-4724-3090-8

Kathryn S. Freeman, Associate Professor of English
University of Miami, Miami, Florida

In her study of newly recovered works by British women, Kathryn Freeman traces the literary relationship between women writers and the Asiatic Society of Bengal, otherwise known as the Orientalists. Distinct from their male counterparts of the Romantic period, who tended to mirror the Orientalist distortions of India, women writers like Phebe Gibbes, Elizabeth Hamilton, Sydney Owenson, Mariana Starke, Eliza Fay, Anna Jones, and Maria Jane Jewsbury interrogated these distortions from the foundation of gender. Freeman takes a three-pronged approach, arguing first that in spite of their marked differences, female authors shared a common resistance to the Orientalists’ intellectual genealogy that allowed them to represent Vedic non-dualism as an alternative subjectivity to the masculine model of European materialist philosophy. She also examines the relationship between gender and epistemology, showing that women’s texts not only shift authority to a feminized subjectivity, but also challenge the recurring Orientalist denigration of Hindu masculinity as effeminate. Finally, Freeman contrasts the shared concern about miscegenation between Orientalists and women writers, contending that the first group betrays anxiety about intermarriage between East Indian Company men and indigenous women while the varying portrayals of intermarriage by women show them poised to dissolve the racial and social boundaries. Her study invites us to rethink the Romantic paradigm of canonical writers as replicators of Orientalists’ cultural imperialism in favor of a more complicated stance that accommodates the differences between male and female authors with respect to India.

Contents

  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction: British women writers and late Enlightenment Anglo-India: the paradoxical binary of Vedic nondualism and the Western sublime
  • 1. The Asiatic Society of Bengal: “beyond the stretch of labouring thought sublime”
  • 2. “Out of that narrow and contracted path”: creativity and authority in Elizabeth Hamilton’s Translations of the Letters of a Hindoo Rajah
  • 3. Confronting sacrifice, resisting the sentimental: Phebe Gibbes, Sidney Owenson, and the Anglo-Indian novel
  • 4. Female authorship in the Anglo-Indian meta-drama of Mariana Starke’s The Sword of Peace (1788) and The Widow of Malabar (1791)
  • Epilogue: lost and found in translation: re-orienting British revolutionary literature through women writers in early Anglo-India
  • Bibliography
  • Index
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Whiteness Fractured

Posted in Books, Media Archive, Monographs, Social Science on 2015-09-21 01:49Z by Steven

Whiteness Fractured

Ashgate Publishing
November 2013
256 pages
Includes 1 b&w illustration
234 x 156 mm
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-4094-6357-3

Cynthia Levine-Rasky, Associate Professor of Sociology
Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Whiteness Fractured examines the many ways in which whiteness is conceptualized today and how it is understood to operate and to effect social relationships. Exploring the intersections between whiteness, social class, ethnicity and psychosocial phenomena, this book is framed by the question of how whiteness works and what it does. With attention to central concepts and the history of whiteness, it explains the four ways in which whiteness works. In its examination of the outward and inward fractures of whiteness, the book sheds light on both its connections with social class and ethnicity and with the ‘epistemology of ignorance’ and the psychoanalytic.

Representing the long career of whiteness on the one hand and investigating its expansion into new areas on the other, Whiteness Fractured reflects the growing maturity of critical whiteness studies. It undertakes a critical analysis of approaches to whiteness and proposes new directions for future action and enquiry. As such, it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in race and ethnicity, intersectionality, colonialism and post-colonialism, and cultural studies.

Contents

  • Section I. Introduction: Framing whiteness; Theorizing whiteness; Interpreting whiteness and its correlates; Histories of whiteness.
  • Section II. Four Ways in which Whiteness Works: Normalization and solipsism; Controlling terms of engagement; Ideological commitments; Exclusionary practices.
  • Section III. Outward Fractures: Whiteness and Intersectionality: The rise of intersectionality theory; Intersectionality theory and the analysis of power; Intersections between whiteness and class; Intersections between whiteness and ethnicity; Intersections between whiteness and Jewish ethnicity.
  • Section IV. Inward Fractures: the Psychic Life of Whiteness: The emotionality of whiteness; The epistemology of ignorance; The psychic turn; Construction of the other in popular racism; Psychoanalytic themes in the construction of the racialized other.
  • Section V. Approaches to Studying Whiteness: Critical-relational-contextual revisited; Whiteness in popular culture; The paradox of action.
  • References
  • Index
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The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies

Posted in Anthropology, Asian Diaspora, Books, Europe, Media Archive, Monographs, Social Science, United Kingdom on 2012-10-05 00:45Z by Steven

The Biopolitics of Mixing: Thai Multiracialities and Haunted Ascendancies

Ashgate Publishing
October 2012
198 pages
234 x 156 mm
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-7546-7680-5
ebook ISBN 978-1-4094-2502-1

Jinthana Haritaworn, Assistant Professor in Gender, Race and Environment at the Faculty of Environmental Studies
York University, Canada

Debates over who belongs in Europe and who doesn’t increasingly speak the language of mixing, but how are the figures commonly described as ‘mixed’ actually embodied? The Biopolitics of Mixing invites us to reckon with the spectres of pathologization past and present, placing the celebration of mixing beside moral panics over terrorism and trafficking and a post-race multiculturalism that elevates some as privileged members of the neoliberal community, whilst ghosting others from it. Drawing on a broad archive including rich qualitative interviews conducted in Britain and Germany, media and policy debates, popular culture, race-based research and queer-of-colour theories, this book imagines into being communities in which people and places normally kept separate can coexist in the same reality.

As such, it will appeal to scholars across a range of sociological and cultural studies, including critical race, ethnic and migration studies, transnational gender and queer studies, German and European studies, Thai and Southeast Asian studies, and studies of affect, performativity, biopolitics and necropolitics. It should be read by all those interested in thinking critically on the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality and disability.

Contents

  • Introduction: haunted origins
  • Where are you from?
  • From monster to fashion model: regenerating racialized bodies
  • Is it better to be mixed race?
  • Hybrid nations, mixed feelings: from marginal man to Obama
  • Exceptional cities, exceptional citizens: metronormativity and mimeticism
  • Reckoning with prostitutes: performing Thai femininity
  • Conclusion: where do we want to go?
  • Bibliography
  • Index
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The Collage Aesthetic in the Harlem Renaissance

Posted in Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Monographs, United States on 2011-03-29 19:20Z by Steven

The Collage Aesthetic in the Harlem Renaissance

Ashgate Publishing
November 2009
232 pages
Includes 5 b&w illustrations
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-7546-6198-6

Rachel Farebrother, Lecturer in American Studies
University of Swansea

Beginning with a subtle and persuasive analysis of the cultural context, Farebrother examines collage in modernist and Harlem Renaissance figurative art and unearths the collage sensibility attendant in Franz Boas’s anthropology. This strategy makes explicit the formal choices of Harlem Renaissance writers by examining them in light of African American vernacular culture and early twentieth-century discourses of anthropology, cultural nationalism and international modernism. At the same time, attention to the politics of form in such texts as Toomer’s Cane, Locke’s The New Negro and selected works by Hurston reveals that the production of analogies, juxtapositions, frictions and distinctions on the page has aesthetic, historical and political implications. Why did these African American writers adopt collage form during the Harlem Renaissance? What did it allow them to articulate? These are among the questions Farebrother poses as she strives for a middle ground between critics who view the Harlem Renaissance as a distinctive, and necessarily subversive, kind of modernism and those who foreground the cooperative nature of interracial creative work during the period. A key feature of her project is her exploration of neglected connections between Euro-American modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, a journey she negotiates while never losing sight of the particularity of African American experience. Ambitious and wide-ranging, Rachel Farebrother’s book offers us a fresh lens through which to view this crucial moment in American culture.

Contents

  • Acknowledgements
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Introduction
  • 1. Boasian Anthropology and the Harlem Renaissance
  • 2. ‘[F]lung out in a jagged, uneven but progressive pattern’: ‘Culture-citizenship’ in The New Negro
  • 3. ‘[A]dventuring through the pieces of a still unorganized mosaic’: Jean Toomer’s Collage Aesthetic in Cane
  • 4. ‘Think[ing] in Hieroglyphics’: Zora Neale Hurston’s Cross-Cultural Aesthetic
  • 5. Reading Zora Neale Hurston’s Textual Synthesis in Jonah’s Gourd Vine and Moses, Man of the Mountain
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Read the introduction here.
Read the index here.

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Gender, Race and Religion in the Colonization of the Americas

Posted in Anthologies, Books, Brazil, Canada, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Media Archive, Religion, United States, Women on 2011-03-01 04:45Z by Steven

Gender, Race and Religion in the Colonization of the Americas

Ashgate Publishing
July 2007
218 pages
219 x 153 mm
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-7546-5189-5

Edited by

Nora E. Jaffary, Associate Professor of History
Concordia University, Montreal, Canada

When Europe introduced mechanisms to control New World territories, resources and populations, women-whether African, indigenous, mixed race, or European-responded and participated in multiple ways. By adopting a comprehensive view of female agency, the essays in this collection reveal the varied implications of women’s experiences in colonialism in North and South America.

Although the Spanish American context receives particular attention here, the volume contrasts the context of both colonial Mexico and Peru to every other major geographic region that became a focus of European imperialism in the early modern period: the Caribbean, Brazil, English America, and New France. The chapters provide a coherent perspective on the comparative history of European colonialism in the Americas through their united treatment of four central themes: the gendered implications of life on colonial frontiers; non-European women’s relationships to Christian institutions; the implications of race-mixing; and social networks established by women of various ethnicities in the colonial context.

This volume adds a new dimension to current scholarship in Atlantic history through its emphasis on culture, gender and race, and through its explicit effort to link religion to the broader imperial framework of economic extraction and political domination.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction: Contextualizing race, gender, and religion in the New World Nora E. Jaffary
  • Part 1: Frontiers
    • 2. Women as go-betweens? Patterns in 16th-century Brazil Alida C. Metcalf
    • 3. Gender and violence: conquest, conversion, and culture on new Spain’s imperial frontier Bruce A. Erickson
    • 4. The very sinews of a new Colony: demographic determinism and the history of early Georgia women, 1732–52 Ben Marsh
  • Part 2: Female Religious
    • 5. The convent as missionary in 17th-century France Susan Broomhall
    • 6. ‘Although I am black, I am beautiful’: Juana Esperanza de San Alberto, Black Carmelite of Puebla Joan C. Bristol
    • 7. Andean women in religion: Beatas, ‘decency’, and the defense of honour in colonial Cuzco Kathryn Burns
  • Part 3: Race Mixing
    • 8. Incest, sexual virtue, and social mobility in late colonial Mexico Nora E. Jaffary
    • 9. ‘An empire founded on libertinage’: The mulâtresse and colonial anxiety in Saint Domingue
      Yvonne Fabella
    • 10. Mediating Mackinac: métis women’s cultural persistence in the Upper Great Lakes Bethany Fleming
  • Part 4: Networks
    • 11. Circuits of knowledge among women in early-17th-century Lima Nancy E. van Deusen
    • 12. Waters of faith, currents of freedom: gender, religion, and ethnicity in inter-imperial trade between Curaçao and Tierra Firme Linda M. Rupert
  • Afterword
    • Women in the Atlantic world
    • Patricia Seed
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Read the introduction here.

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Multifaceted Identity of Interethnic Young People: Chameleon Identities

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Books, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Social Science, United Kingdom on 2010-06-24 18:27Z by Steven

Multifaceted Identity of Interethnic Young People: Chameleon Identities

Ashgate Publishing
May 2010
Illustrations: Includes 24 (including 5 tables) line drawings
234 x 156 mm
224 pages
Hardback
ISBN: 978-0-7546-7860-1
eBook ISBN: 978-0-7546-9691-9
BL Reference: 305.8’0083-dc22
 
Sultana Choudhry, Principal Lecturer in Psychology and Director of Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health
London Metropolitan University, UK

The number of interethnic individuals is one of the most striking demographic changes in Britain over the last decade. Demonstrating both that identity is fluid and multifaceted rather than fixed, and that people of an interethnic background do not necessarily experience identity conflict as proposed by some social scientists, Multifaceted Identity of Inter-ethnic Young People explores the manner in which interethnic young people define their identities. In doing so, it also looks at their parents and their experiences as interethnic couples in society. Presenting rich new empirical information relating to young people of Black, White, Asian and Chinese interethnic backgrounds, this book also examines the impact that inter-religious relationships have upon young people’s sense of identity, whilst also discussing the implications of the election of America’s first interethnic president. As such, it will be of interest to social scientists working in the fields of race, ethnicity and identity.

Read the introduction here.

Table of Contents

Part 1: Placing Identity Theory and Research in Context
Introduction
Social science theories and research on identity
The science of ethnic and inter-ethnic identity

Part 2: The Research
How the research was carried out

Part 3: Voices – Non Inter-Ethnic and Inter-Ethnic
Non-inter ethnic parents and children
Inter-ethnic couples

Part 4: The Coming of the Chameleons
Who am I? Identities adopted
A chameleon identity
The fine art of choosing an identity
The impact of being inter-ethnic
Conclusions: the future is inter-ethnic

Appendices
References
Index

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Black Skins, Black Masks: Hybridity, Dialogism, Performativity

Posted in Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Women on 2010-05-04 18:07Z by Steven

Black Skins, Black Masks: Hybridity, Dialogism, Performativity

Ashgate Publishing
February 2005
188 pages
234 x 156 mm
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-7546-3641-0

Shirley Anne Tate, Senior Lecturer and Director of Studies
Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies
University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Black Skin, Black Masks: Hybridity, Dialogism, Performativity offers a timely exploration of Black identity and its negotiation. The book draws on empirical work recording everyday conversations between Black women: friends, peers and family members. These conversations are discussed in the light of the work of Homi Bhabha, Stuart Hall, Gerd Baumann, Claire Alexander and others on questions of hybridity, identity, otherness and the development of ‘new ethnicities’. Tate aims to address what she sees as significant omissions in contemporary Black Cultural Studies. She argues that theorists have rarely looked at the process of identity construction in terms of lived-experience; and that they have tended to concentrate on the demise of the essential Black subject, paying little attention to gender.

The book points to a continuation of a ‘politics of the skin’ in Black identities. As such it argues against Bhabha’s claim that essence is not central to hybrid identities. The conversations recorded in the book reveal the ways in which women negotiate the category of Blackness, in what Tate calls a ‘hybridity-of- the-everyday’.

The book introduces a new interpretative vocabulary to look at the ways in which hybridity is orchestrated and fashioned, showing it to be performative, dialogical and dependent on essentialism.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Foucault, Bakhtin, ethnomethodology
  • Critical ontologies and racialized gender
  • Storied hybridity and gendered readings of ‘Race’
  • Beyond hybridity: bodily schema and the ‘Third Space’
  • Resisting Black skin
  • Hybridity, dialogism, performativity
  • Fetishizing community: a politics of skin, homes and belonging
  • Conclusion; Bibliography
  • Index
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