Hazel Carby: Where Are You From?

Posted in Autobiography, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Media Archive, United Kingdom, Videos on 2019-10-22 01:31Z by Steven

Hazel Carby: Where Are You From?

Duke Franklin Humanities Institute
2018-11-05

An account of how a young black girl, growing up in South London, had to learn to negotiate the racial fictions of post World War Two Britain, drawn from Dr. Carby’s forthcoming book, “Imperial Intimacies” (Verso 2019).

Hazel Carby is Charles C. & Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies & American Studies and the Director of the Initiative on Race, Gender, and Globalization at Yale University. Born in postwar UK, trained at the University of Birmingham under Stuart Hall’s mentorship, she is a foundational scholar of US black feminist intellectual history. Her books include Reconstructing Womanhood (1987), Race Men (1998), and Cultures in Babylon (1999). She was named the 2014 recipient of the Jay B. Hubbell Medal for Lifetime Achievement in American Literary Studies.

Co-directed by Richard Powell, Jasmine Nichole Cobb, and Lamonte Aidoo, the From Slavery to Freedom Lab examines the life and afterlives of slavery and emancipation, linking Duke University to the Global South.

Watch the address here.

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France Winddance Twine | Digging Up the Past: Race & Class in Brazil

Posted in Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Media Archive, Social Science, Videos on 2019-02-26 19:59Z by Steven

France Winddance Twine | Digging Up the Past: Race & Class in Brazil

Duke Franklin Humanities Institute
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
2019-02-11

The From Slavery to Freedom Lab welcomed France Winddance Twine on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the publication of her book, “Racism in a Racial Democracy: The Maintenance of White Supremacy in Brazil.” Dr. Twine reflected on intersectionality and racial, gender, and class politics in Brazil and the future of Brazilian Studies.

France Winddance Twine is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is an ethnographer, a feminist race theorist, and a documentary filmmaker, whose research focuses on multiple dimensions of inequality. Twine’s research provides case studies for a nuanced analysis of the intersections of race, class, sexuality and gender inequality. Twine has conducted extensive field research on both sides of the Atlantic including: Brazil, Britain, and the United States. She is the author and editor of ten books including: Racism in a Racial Democracy: The Maintenance of White Supremacy in Brazil; A White Side of Black Britain: Interracial Intimacy and Racial Literacy; Geographies of Privilege; Outsourcing the Womb: Race, Class, and Gestational Surrogacy in the Global Market; and Girls with Guns: Firearms, Feminism and Militarism.

Drawing inspiration from John Hope Franklin’s path-breaking 1947 study, the “From Slavery to Freedom” Franklin Humanities Lab seeks to examine the life and afterlives of slavery and emancipation, linking Duke University to the Global South.

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Duke Identity and Diversity Lab Seeking Participants for Online Study Relating to Their Experiences as a Multiracial Individual

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2019-01-29 02:13Z by Steven

Duke Identity and Diversity Lab Seeking Participants for Online Study Relating to Their Experiences as a Multiracial Individual

Duke Identity and Diversity Lab
Duke University
Department of Psychology & Neuroscience
417 Chapel Drive, Box 90086
Durham, North Carolina 27708-0086
Telephone: (919) 660-5790

Dr. Sarah Gaither, Principal Investigator; Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

2019-01-28

As multiracials often have unique experiences related to their diverse heritages, this study aims to explore how factors such as physical appearance, gender, environment, and knowledge of heritage languages may inform multiracial identity development and experiences.

This is an online study for participants who identify as either mixed-race, biracial, having multiple ethnicities or multiple cultural heritages. Participants will be asked to complete a variety of multiple choice and short answer response questions relating to their experiences as a multiracial individual.

The study typically lasts between 30 to 60 minutes and participants will be entered to win a $50.00 Amazon gift card.

To begin the study, please follow the link here.

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Structural Competency: Assessing A New Paradigm for Race & Racisms in Medicine

Posted in Health/Medicine/Genetics, Media Archive, Social Justice, Social Science, United States, Videos on 2018-08-22 03:20Z by Steven

Structural Competency: Assessing A New Paradigm for Race & Racisms in Medicine

John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
2017-10-12

Jonathan Metzl, MD, Ph.D, Frederick B. Rentschler II Professor of Sociology and Psychiatry; Director of the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Jonathan Metzl is the Frederick B. Rentschler II Professor of Sociology and Psychiatry, and the Director of the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society, at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He received his MD from the University of Missouri, MA in humanities/poetics and psychiatric internship/residency from Stanford University, and PhD in American Culture from University of Michigan. A 2008 Guggenheim fellow, Professor Metzl has written extensively for medical, psychiatric, and popular publications. His books include “The Protest Psychosis, Prozac on the Couch,” and “Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality.”

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Race, Place and Community

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Interviews, Live Events, Media Archive, Social Justice, United States on 2017-03-30 12:51Z by Steven

Race, Place and Community

Duke University
Trent Semans Center
Great Hall
Duke University Medical Center Greenspace
Durham, North Carolina 27710
Thursday, 2017-03-30, 08:00-10:00 EDT (Local Time)

Emily Raboteau, Professor of English
City College of New York

Mark Anthony Neal, Host and Professor of African and African American Studies
Duke University

A conversation with award-winning author Emily Raboteau. A Q&A and book (Searching for Zion) signing will follow.

The event, “Race, Place and Community,” is free and open to the public. Light breakfast will be served. Those unable to attend can watch a live webcast of the event at bit.ly/EmilyRaboteau.

Organized by the Duke Clinical Research Institute, the event co-sponsors include the Duke School of Medicine, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Center on Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship, and Left of Black.

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Race, Place and Community: A Conversation with Author Emily Raboteau

Posted in Articles, Identity Development/Psychology, Interviews, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science, United States on 2017-03-29 20:06Z by Steven

Race, Place and Community: A Conversation with Author Emily Raboteau

DCORE: Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
2017-03-28

Micah English, T ’17


Emily Raboteau

Award-winning author Emily Raboteau will visit Duke and Durham this week as part of the Duke School of Medicine’s ongoing series, A Conversation about Race.

She will be interviewed by Mark Anthony Neal, a professor of black popular culture in the Department of African and African American studies. Neal, is also the co-director of the Duke Council on Race and Ethnicity and the host of the weekly webcast, Left of Black. A portion of the event will be recorded live for a future episode of Left of Black.

The event, “Race, Place and Community,” is free and open to the public and will be held at 8 a.m., Thursday, March 30 in the Great Hall at Trent Semans Center. Light breakfast will be served. Those unable to attend can watch a live webcast of the event at bit.ly/EmilyRaboteau.

Raboteau, an English professor at the City College of New York, will sign copies of her latest book, Searching for Zion, following the talk.

Organized by the Duke Clinical Research Institute, the event co-sponsors include the Duke School of Medicine, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Center on Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship, and Left of Black.

Searching for Zion is a work of creative nonfiction that chronicles Raboteau’s search for a place to call “home,” as a biracial woman who never felt at home in America. Recently DCORE was able to speak with Raboteau about being of mixed race, blackness and the racial color line…

Read the entire interview here.

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How Biracial Identity Affects Behavior

Posted in Audio, Identity Development/Psychology, Interviews, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2017-03-22 15:07Z by Steven

How Biracial Identity Affects Behavior

The State of Things
WUNC 91.5, North Carolina Public Radio
2017-03-21

Charlie Shelton, Producer

Phoebe Judge, Host/Reporter


Sarah Gaither is an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University
Credit Duke University

Guest host Phoebe Judge talks with psychology and neuroscience professor Sarah Gaither about biracial identity and behavior.

Sarah Gaither is interested in how growing up with multiple racial identities shapes one’s social perceptions and behaviors.

Gaither is an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University, and her work explores how racial and gender diversity can facilitate positive relationships within different social circles…

Listen to the interview (00:17:29) here.

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2016 Duke Global Brazil Conference

Posted in Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, Health/Medicine/Genetics, Live Events, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science on 2016-03-03 21:11Z by Steven

2016 Duke Global Brazil Conference

Duke University
Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall (FHI Garage)
C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse
Durham, North Carolina
2016-03-04, 09:00-17:30 EST (Local Time)

Co-sponsored by FHI Global Brazil Lab and the Duke Brazil Initiative

Invited guests include:

  • Keynote: Dr. Elizabeth Hordge-Freeman (USF) – The Color of Love in Bahia
  • Dr. John Collins (CUNY) – Race, Violence, and the State in Bahia
  • Dr. William Pan (Duke) – Environment and Health in the Amazon
  • Dr. Bryan Pitts (U.Ga) – Sound and Politics
  • Guilherme Andreas (JMU) – Flute recital with piano by Gianne Ge Zhu

For more information, click here.

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Mixed 101: Creating a Space to Explore Mixed Race Identity

Posted in Campus Life, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2015-02-18 02:55Z by Steven

Mixed 101: Creating a Space to Explore Mixed Race Identity

Duke University
Durham, North Carolina 27708
Counseling & Psych Services (CAPS)
Resource Room 0010
Bryan Center – Multicultural Center
Thursdays, 17:00-18:30 EST (Local Time) on February 12, 19, 26, and March 5

Marcella Wagner and Cat Goyeneche

CAPS is offering a weekly group for students who identify as mixed or multiracial to dialogue and explore our experiences of being mixed race.

For more information, click here.

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(Re)mapping the Borderlands of Blackness: Afro-Mexican Consciousness and the Politics of Culture

Posted in Anthropology, Caribbean/Latin America, Dissertations, History, Media Archive, Mexico on 2014-01-16 19:53Z by Steven

(Re)mapping the Borderlands of Blackness: Afro-Mexican Consciousness and the Politics of Culture

Duke University
2013
233 pages

Talia Weltman-Cisneros

Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Romance Studies in the Graduate School of Duke University

The dominant cartography of post-Revolutionary Mexico has relied upon strategic constructions of a unified and homogenized national and cultural consciousness (mexicanidad), in order to invent and map a coherent image of imagined community. These strategic boundaries of mexicanidad have also relied upon the mapping of specific codes of being and belonging onto the Mexican geo-body. I argue that these codes have been intimately linked to the discourse of mestizaje, which, in its articulation and operation, has been fashioned as a cosmic tool with which to dissolve and solve the ethno-racial and social divisions following the Revolution, and to usher a unified mestizo nation onto a trajectory towards modernity.

However, despite its rhetoric of salvation and seemingly race-less/positivistic articulation, the discourse of mestizaje has propagated an uneven configuration of mexicanidad in which the belonging of certain elements have been coded as inferior, primitive, problematic, and invisible. More precisely, in the case of Mexicans of African descent, this segment of the population has also been silenced and dis-placed from this dominant cartography.

This dissertation examines the coding of blackness and its relationship with mexicanidad in specific sites and spaces of knowledge production and cultural production in the contemporary era. I first present an analysis of this production immediately in the period following the Revolution, especially from the 1930’s to the 1950’s, a period labeled as the “cultural phase of the Mexican Revolution.” This time period was strategic in manufacturing and disseminating a precise politics of culture that was used to reflect this dominant configuration and cartography of mexicanidad. That is, the knowledge and culture produced during this time imbedded and displayed codes of being and belonging, which resonated State projects and narratives that were used to define and secure the boundaries of a unified, mestizo imaginary of mexicanidad. And, it is within this context that I suggest that blackness has been framed as invisible, problematic, and foreign. For example, cultural texts such as film and comics have served as sites that have facilitated the production and reflection of this uneasy relationship between blackness and mexicanidad. Moreover, this strained and estranged relationship has been further sustained by the nationalization and institutionalization of knowledge and culture related to the black presence and history in Mexico. From the foundational text La raza cósmica, written in 1925 by José Vasconcelos, to highly influential corpuses produced by Mexican anthropologists during this post-Revolutionary period, the production of knowledge and the production of culture have been intimately tied together within an uneven structure of power that has formalized racialized frames of reference and operated on a logic of coloniality. As a result, today it is common to be met with the notion that “no hay negros en México” (there are no blacks in Mexico).

Yet, on the contrary, contemporary Afro-Mexican artists and community organizations within the Costa Chica region have been engaging a different cultural politics that has been serving as a tool of place-making and as a decolonization of codes of being and belonging. In this regard, I present an analysis of contemporary Afro-Mexican cultural production, specifically visual arts and radio, that present a counter-cartography of the relationship between blackness and mexicanidad. More specifically, in their engagement of the discourse of cimarronaje (maroonage), I propose that these sites of cultural production also challenge, re-think, re-imagine, and re-configure this relationship. I also suggest that this is an alternative discourse of cimarronaje that functions as a decolonial project in terms of the reification and re-articulation of afromexicanidad (Afro-Mexican-ness) as a dynamic and pluri-versal construction of being and belonging. And, thus, in their link to community programs and social action initiatives, this contemporary cultural production also strives to combat the historical silence, dis-placement, and discrimination of the Afro-Mexican presence in and contributions to the nation. In turn, this dissertation offers an intervention in the making of and the relationships between race, space and place, and presents an interrogation of the geo-politics and bio-politics of being and belonging in contemporary Mexico.

Contents

  • Abstract
  • List of Figures
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter One: Mapping Blackness Elsewhere: Mestizaje, Anthropology, and the Coloniality of Knowledge
    • 1.1 Mestizaje and the Mapping of Blackness Beyond the Borders of Modern Mexicanidad
    • 1.2 Gonzalo Aguirre Beltran: The Production of Knowledge and the Anthropological (Dis)placement of Blackness in Post-Revolutionary Mexico
    • 1.3 Recuerdos del Jarocho: The Museumification of Blackness
    • 1.4 The Coloniality of Knowledge and the Dis-placement of Blackness
  • Chapter Two: Forjando Patria: Framing and Performing Blackness in the “Golden Age” of Mexican Culture
    • 2.1 Memin Pinguin: Dis-locating Blackness
    • 2.2 Angelitos negros: Absorbing Blackness and Saving the National Family
    • 2.3 Al son del mambo: Discovering and Modernizing the Primitive Place of Blackness
    • 2.4 On Framing Blackness and Popular Culture as a Racialized Regime of Representation
  • Chapter Three; Cimarronaje Cultural: Towards a Counter-Cartography of Blackness and Belonging in Mexico
    • 3.1 Articulating the Place of Blackness in the Costa Chica
    • 3.2 Understanding Cimarronaje Cultural as a Counter-Cartography of Blackness and as a Place-Making Narrative
    • 3.3 Cimarronaje Cultural: Towards a Counter-Cartography of Blackness
      • 3.3.1 El Centro Cultural Cimarron
      • 3.3.2 Naufragio and the Work of Aydée Rodriguez Lopez
      • 3.3.3 Cimarron: La Voz de los Afromestizos
    • 3.4 Conclusions: Cimarronaje as a Decolonial Project
  • Chapter Four: Towards a Re-mapping of Blackness and Belonging in Mexico
    • 4.1 México Negro and the Encuentro de los Pueblos Negros: From Pluri-versal Networks to Social and Political Action
    • 4.2 Nomenclature, Identity in Politics, and the Re-thinking of Afro-Mexican Consciousness
  • Conclusions
  • Figures One-Six
  • Bibliography
  • Biography

LIST OF FIGURES

  • Figure 1: Mural Painting, Centro Cultural Cimarrón
  • Figure 2: Mural Painting, Centro Cultural Cimarrón
  • Figure 3: Mural Painting, Centro Cultural Cimarrón
  • Figure 4: Naufragio, Aydée Rodriguez Lopez
  • Figure 5: Naufragio, Aydée Rodriguez Lopez
  • Figure 6: Naufragio, Aydée Rodriguez Lopez

Read the entire dissertation here.

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