The Evolution and Genetics of Latin American Populations

Posted in Anthropology, Books, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Media Archive, Monographs on 2013-03-10 03:09Z by Steven

The Evolution and Genetics of Latin American Populations

Cambridge University Press
December 2001
528 pages
12 b/w illus. 128 tables
228 x 152 mm
Hardback ISBN: 9780521652759
Paperback ISBN: ISBN:9780521022392
eBook ISBN: 9780511837128

Francisco M. Salzano
Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Maria C. Bortolini
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

The human genetic make-up of Latin America is a reflection of successive waves of colonization and immigration. There have been few works dealing with the biology of human populations at a continental scale, and while much data is available on the genetics of Latin American populations, most information remains scattered throughout the literature. This volume examines Latin American human populations in relation to their origins, environment, history, demography and genetics, drawing on aspects of nutrition, physiology, and morphology for an integrated and multidisciplinary approach. The result is a fascinating account of a people characterized by a turbulent history, marked heterogeneity, and unique genetic traits.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • 1. Origins
  • 2. Environment and history
  • 3. Socioeconomic indices, demography, and population structure
  • 4. Ecology, nutrition, and physiological adaptation
  • 5. Morphology
  • 6. Health and disease
  • 7. Haemoglobin types and haemoglobinopathies
  • 8. Normal genetic variation at the protein, glycoconjugate, and DNA levels
  • 9. Gene dynamics
  • 10. Synthesis.
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Population structure and admixture in Cerro Largo, Uruguay, based on blood markers and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms

Posted in Anthropology, Articles, Caribbean/Latin America, Health/Medicine/Genetics, Media Archive on 2012-03-04 18:29Z by Steven

Population structure and admixture in Cerro Largo, Uruguay, based on blood markers and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms

American Journal of Human Biology
Volume 18, Issue 4 (July/August 2006)
pages 513‚Äď524
DOI: 10.1002/ajhb.20520

Mónica Sans
Departamento de Antropología Biológica, Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación
Universidad de la Rep√ļblica

D. Andrew Merriwether
Department of Anthropology
Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York

Pedro C. Hidalgo
Laboratorio de Inmunogenética e Histocompatibilidad
Instituto Nacional de Donación y Trasplante de Células, Organos y Tejidos
Hospital de Cl√≠nicas ‚ÄúManuel Quintela‚ÄĚ

Nilo Bentancor
Laboratorio de Inmunogenética e Histocompatibilidad
Instituto Nacional de Donación y Trasplante de Células, Organos y Tejidos
Hospital de Cl√≠nicas ‚ÄúManuel Quintela‚ÄĚ

Tania A. Weimer
Laboratório de Biotecnologia Veterinária
Universidade Luterana do Brasil

Maria Helena L.P. Franco
Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul

Inés Alvarez
Laboratorio de Inmunogenética e Histocompatibilidad
Instituto Nacional de Donación y Trasplante de Células, Organos y Tejidos
Hospital de Cl√≠nicas ‚ÄúManuel Quintela‚ÄĚ

Brian M. Kemp
Department of Anthropology
University of California, Davis

Francisco M. Salzano
Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul

Recent studies of the Uruguayan population revealed different amounts of Amerindian and African genetic contributions. Our previous analysis of Afro-Uruguayans from the capital city of the Department of Cerro Largo showed a high proportion of African genes, and the effects of directional mating involving Amerindian women. In this paper, we extended the analysis to a sample of more than 100 individuals representing a random sample of the population of the whole Department. Based on 18 autosomal markers and one X-linked marker, we estimated 82% European, 8% Amerindian, and 10% African contributions to their ancestry, while from seven mitochondrial DNA site-specific polymorphic markers and sequences of hypervariable segment I, we determined 49% European, 30% Amerindian, and 21% African maternal contributions. Directional matings between Amerindian women and European men were detected, but differences involving Africans were not significant. Data about the specific origins of maternal lineages were also provided, and placed in a historical context.

Read the entire article here.

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