Counseling the Multiracial Population: Couples, Individuals, and Families

Posted in Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Videos on 2015-10-21 23:42Z by Steven

Counseling the Multiracial Population: Couples, Individuals, and Families

Microtraining Associates
2003
01:15:00

Kelley Kenney

Mark Kenney

This film presents the worldview experiences of interracial couples, multiracial individuals, and multiracial families including trans-racial adoptive families. It also makes clear suggestions for action in the interview.

Six live demonstrations showcase typical issues such as concerns and challenges faced by the multiracial population, acceptance and respect by society and family, questions of identity, positive identity development, and navigating cultural worldview differences.

Read the leader guide here.

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Preparing counselors for America’s multiracial population boom

Posted in Articles, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2015-07-25 00:41Z by Steven

Preparing counselors for America’s multiracial population boom

Counseling Today: A Publication of the American Counseling Association
2015-07-15

Bethany Bray, Staff Writer

Preparing counselors for America’s multiracial population boom

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the nation’s multiracial population will triple by 2060.

That prognostication only heightens the long-standing need for counselors to better understand this population, say Kelley and Mark Kenney. The husband-and-wife counselor educators spearheaded development of the Competencies for Counseling the Multiracial Population, which were endorsed by the American Counseling Association Governing Council this past spring.

The new multiracial competencies, which offer guidance for working with individuals, couples and families who have backgrounds from more than one racial heritage, were developed by a task force made up of members of the ACA Multiracial/Multiethnic Counseling Concerns Interest Network, co-chaired by the Kenneys.

Counselors are going to have multiracial clients walking through their doors more and more frequently, says Mark Kenney, a licensed professional counselor (LPC) who is a professor and coordinator of the master’s program in psychology at Chestnut Hill College at DeSales University in Pennsylvania. That client might be a multiracial teenager who is struggling in school, a same-sex couple that has adopted a child of a different heritage or many other scenarios.

The ACA Code of Ethics’ call for counselors to be competent and ethical practitioners applies here, Mark says. Understanding and being sensitive to the multiracial experience “isn’t an option anymore,” he says. “This is an expectation with this population.”

“Historically, there has not been a good relationship between this community and the helping professions,” he adds. “Only within the last 20 years has there been better research and understanding of this population.”

Much of the talk leading up to the 2008 election of President Barack Obama – a man with a white mother and a black father – suggested that Americans still harbor significant misunderstandings about the biracial population, says Kelley Kenney, a full professor and program coordinator of student affairs in higher education at Kutztown University.

“There was a lot of discussion about [multiracial] couples and families, brought on by the fact that we had a man who was running for president who, oh by the way, just happened to be of multiple heritages,” Kelley says. “As recent as 2008, there was still a lot of bias and stereotyping going on…

Read the entire article here.

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Competencies for Counseling the Multiracial Population

Posted in Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Reports, Social Work, Teaching Resources, United States on 2015-06-08 02:00Z by Steven

Competencies for Counseling the Multiracial Population

Multi-Racial/Ethnic Counseling Concerns (MRECC) Interest Network of the American Counseling Association Taskforce
American Counseling Association
2015-02-02
51 pages

Co-Chairs/Authors:

Kelley R. Kenney

Mark E. Kenney

Taskforce Members/Authors:

Susan B. Alvarado

Amanda L. Baden

Leah Brew

Stuart Chen-Hayes

Cheryl L. Crippen,

Hank L. Harris

Richard C. Henriksen, Jr.

Krista M. Malott

Derrick A. Paladino

Mark L. Pope

Carmen F. Salazar

Anneliese A. Singh

In memory of Dr. Bea Wehrly for her tireless work and advocacy. The publication of her book, Counseling Interracial Individuals and Families, by the American Counseling Association in 1996 was a major part of this journey.

Competencies for Counseling the Multiracial Population: Couples, Families, and Individuals; and Transracial Adoptees and Families (Endorsed and adopted by the ACA Governing Council, March 2015)

The Multiracial/Ethnic Counseling Concerns (MRECC) Interest Network of the American Counseling Association has developed the following competencies in order to promote the development of sound professional counseling practices to competently and effectively attend to the diverse needs of the multiple heritage population.

Section I: Overview

This document is intended to provide counseling competencies for working with and advocating for members of the multiracial population including interracial couples, multiracial families, and multiracial individuals, and transracial adoptees and families. The document is intended for use by counselors and other helping professionals; individuals who educate, train, and/or supervise current and future counseling and other helping professionals; as well as individuals who may conduct research and/or other professional activities with members of the multiracial population. To this end, the goal is for these competencies to serve as a resource and provide a framework for how counseling and other helping professionals can competently and effectively work with and advocate for members of the multiracial population…

Read the entire report here.

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Contemporary US multiple heritage couples, individuals, and families: Issues, concerns, and counseling implications

Posted in Articles, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2012-05-18 20:33Z by Steven

Contemporary US multiple heritage couples, individuals, and families: Issues, concerns, and counseling implications

Counselling Psychology Quarterly
Volume 25, Issue 2, (June 2012)
Special Issue: Race, Culture, and Mental Health: Metissage, Mestizaje, Mixed “Race”, and Beyond
pages 99-112
DOI: 10.1080/09515070.2012.674682

Mark Kenney, Adjunct Professor
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Multicultural Education and Consulting, Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

Kelley Kenney, Professor of Counseling & Human Services
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Multicultural Education and Consulting, Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

This article introduces the special edition by providing an overview of how policies and attitudes have influenced the experience of multiple heritage couples, individuals, and families in the American context. This history is linked to the developmental tasks of multiracial individuals and families in contemporary context. This paper also discusses the counseling implications emphasizing the importance of delivering culturally competent and sensitive services.

Introduction

Multiple heritage couples and individuals historically have been the subject of controversy and scrutiny. Myths and stereotypes that pervade our society suggest that individuals who couple interracially are dysfunctional (Yancey, 2002); are attempting to make a statement (Root, 2001); or have ulterior motives for doing so (Wardle, 1992, 1999). Motives speculated upon include quests for the exotic, sexual curiosity and promiscuity, economic and social status or achievement, domination, potential citizenship, rebellion against society or family, low sell-esteem, or racial self-hatred (DaCosta, 2007; Karis, 2003: Root, 1992; Spickard, 1989; Yancey, 2002); that persons of color are more willing to accept children of interracial unions than are white people (Wardle, 1992, 1999); and that the difficulties faced by interracial individuals and families are based on race (Root, 2001: Wehrly, 1996). Myths and stereotypes about multiple heritage individuals suggest that they are doomed to a life of rejection, and confusion about who they are (Wardle, 1999; Yancey, 2002).

This paper examines contemporary multiple heritage couples, individuals, and families in the US; the salient issues and concerns that have historically confronted this population; and the counseling implications of which those working with this growing population need to be aware. In this article, we address multiple heritage individuals, couples, and families drawing on a literature that uses multiple terms to identify them “Interracial couples” are defined as partners, married or not, of a different racial background (Root, 1992; Spickard, 1989). “Multiracial individuals” are defined as individuals whose biological parents or whose lineage are of two or more different racial backgrounds (Funderburg, 1994; Gibbs, 1989; Root, 1992)…

Read or purchase the article here.

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6th Critical Multicultural Counselling & Psychotherapy Conference: Metissage, Mestizaje, Mixed “Race”, and Beyond

Posted in Canada, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Live Events, Media Archive on 2011-05-06 01:47Z by Steven

6th Critical Multicultural Counselling & Psychotherapy Conference: Metissage, Mestizaje, Mixed “Race”, and Beyond

Centre for Diversity in Counselling & Psychotherapy
University of Toronto
2011-06-07 through 2011-06-08

Keynote Presentation: Contemporary Multiple Heritage Couples, Individuals, and Families: A Generation with Diverse Views and Varied Experiences.

Mark Kenney, Adjunct Professor
Chestnut Place College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kelley Kenney, Professor of Counseling & Human Services
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania

The five conference themes are as follows:

  1. Mixed “race”/multiracial identities and their development: current research (trends, methodological issues, etc.) and suggestions for future research
  2. Intersection of mixed “race” and other socially constructed identities (class, gender, sexual orientation, etc.)
  3. Counselling practice with interracial couples: current research; clinical issues; therapeutic issues surrounding counsellor attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and skill sets; current counselling practice; suggestions for future research and practice.
  4. Counselling practice with mixed “race”/multiracial individuals (including children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly): current research; clinical issues; therapeutic issues surrounding counsellor attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and skill sets; current counselling practice; suggestions for future research and practice.
  5. Counselling practice with mixed “race” families (including extended families of interracial couples and families that adopt transracially): current research; clinical issues; therapeutic issues surrounding counsellor attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and skill sets; current counselling practice; suggestions for future research and practice.

For more information, click here.

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Counseling Multiracial Families

Posted in Books, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive on 2010-01-01 02:24Z by Steven

Counseling Multiracial Families

SAGE Publications
1999
208 pages
Paperback ISBN: 9780761915911
Hardcover ISBN: 9780761915904

Bea Wehrly, Professor Emeritus of Counselor Education
Western Illinois University

Kelley R. Kenney, Professor of Counseling & Human Services
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Multicultural Education and Consulting, Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

Mark Kenney, Adjunct Professor
Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Multicultural Education and Consulting, Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

Multiracial families (families in which one member of the family has a different racial heritage than the other member(s) of the family) comprise a rapidly growing U.S. population. Counseling Multiracial Families addresses this population that has been neglected in the counseling literature. In the first chapter, readers are given a comprehensive history of racial mixing in the United States special needs and issues of multiracial families as well as special strengths of multiracial families are addressed. Challenges of interracially married couples are explored as are the social and cultural issues related to parenting and child rearing of multiracial children in today’s society. The results of biracial identity development research are translated into counseling practice with the children, adolescents, and adults in multiracial families.

Table of Contents

  • Historical Overview
  • Multiracial Individuals, Interracial Couples and Families
  • Interracial Marriage
  • Current Conditions and Challenges
  • Multiracial Individuals
  • Issues across the Lifespan
  • Other Multiracial Families
  • Intervention and Treatment of Multiracial Individuals, Couples and Families
  • Case Studies
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