Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germany

Posted in Autobiography, Books, Europe, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Women on 2013-04-02 04:28Z by Steven

Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germany

Peter Lang
2008
168 pages
ISBN 978-1-4331-0278-3 (paperback)

Ika HĂŒgel-Marshall (Translated by Elizabeth Gaffney)

Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germany, republished in a new annotated edition, recounts Ika HĂŒgel-Marshall’s experiences growing up as the daughter of a white German woman and an African-American man after World War II. As an “occupation baby”, born in a small German town in 1947, Ika has a double stigma: Not only has she been born out of wedlock, but she is also Black. Although loved by her mother, Ika’s experiences with German society’s reaction to her skin color resonate with the insidiousness of racism, thus instilling in her a longing to meet her biological father. When she is seven, the state places her into a church-affiliated orphanage far away from where her mother, sister, and stepfather live. She is exposed to the scorn and cruelty of the nuns entrusted with her care. Despite the institutionalized racism, Ika overcomes these hurdles, and finally, when she is in her forties, she locates her father with the help of a good friend and discovers that she has a loving family in Chicago.

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Dreams and Nightmares of a White Australia: Representing Aboriginal Assimilation in the Mid-twentieth Century

Posted in Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Monographs, Oceania on 2011-10-22 22:28Z by Steven

Dreams and Nightmares of a White Australia: Representing Aboriginal Assimilation in the Mid-twentieth Century

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2009
257 pages
Weight: 0.410 kg, 0.904 lbs
Paperback ISBN:  978-3-03911-722-2
Series: Studies in Asia-Pacific “Mixed Race” (Volume 3)

Catriona Elder, Professor of Sociology
University of Syndney

By the mid-twentieth century the various Australian states began changing their approaches to Aboriginal peoples from one of exclusion to assimilation. These policy changes meant that Aboriginal people, particularly those identified as being of mixed heritage, were to be encouraged to become part of the dominant non-Aboriginal community—the Australian nation.

This book explores this significant policy change from a cultural perspective, considering the ways in which assimilation was imagined in literary fiction of the 1950s and 1960s. Drawing on novels from a range of genres—the Gothic, historical romance, the western and family melodrama–it analyses how these texts tell their assimilation stories.

Taking insights from critical whiteness studies the author highlights both the pleasures and anxieties that the idea of Aboriginal assimilation raised in the non-Aboriginal community. There are elements of these assimilation stories—maternal love, stolen children, violence and land ownership—that still have an impact in the unsettled present of many post-colonial nations. By exploring the history of assimilation the author suggests ideas for a different future.

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures
  • CHAPTER 1: Writing a story of mixed-race relations in ‘white Australia’  (first 3 pages)
  • CHAPTER 2: Mapping a ‘white Australia’: political and government responses to the ‘half-caste’ problem
  • CHAPTER 3: Blood: elimination, assimilation and the white Australian nation in E. V. Timms’ The Scarlet Frontier
  • CHAPTER 4: Making families white: Indigenous mothers, families and children in Gwen Meredith’s Blue Hills: the Ternna-Boolla Story
  • CHAPTER 5: Haunted homes: children, desire and dispossession in Helen Heney’s The Leaping Blaze
  • CHAPTER 6: Scopic pleasure and fantasy: visualising assimilation and the half-caste in Leonard Mann’s Venus Half-Caste
  • CHAPTER 7: Dead centre: frontier relations in Olaf Ruhen’s Naked Under Capricorn
  • CHAPTER 8: Conclusion
  • Bibliography
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Visibly Different: Face, Place and Race in Australia

Posted in Anthologies, Autobiography, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Oceania on 2011-10-22 21:44Z by Steven

Visibly Different: Face, Place and Race in Australia

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2007
186 pages
Weight: 0.330 kg, 0.728 lbs
Paperback ISBN: 978-3-03911-323-1
Series: Studies in Asia-Pacific “Mixed Race” (Volume 2)

Edited by:

Maureen Perkins, Associate Professor of History, Anthropology and Sociology
Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

What does an Australian look like? Many Australians assume that there is such a thing as an ‘ethnic’ face, and that it indicates recent arrival or refugee status. This volume contains nine life narratives by Australians who reflect on the experience of being categorised on the basis of their facial appearance.

The problem of who is ‘us’ and who is ‘them’ is at the heart of some of the most important challenges facing the contemporary world. Assuming that facial appearance and identity are inextricably linked makes this challenge even harder.

The introduction by the editor provides the theoretical framework to these narratives. It discusses the relevance to notions of belonging and identity of the term ‘mixed race’, and concludes that we are all mixed race, whether we look white, black or ‘ethnic’.

Table of Contents

  • Maureen Perkins: Visibly Different: Face, Place and Race in Australia
  • Jan Teagle Kapetas: Lubra Lips, Lubra Lips: Reflections on my Face
  • Jean Boladeras: The Desolate Loneliness of Racial Passing
  • Lynette Rodriguez: But Who Are You Really?
  • Wendy Holland: Rehearsing Multiple Identities
  • Christine Choo/Antoinette Carrier/Clarissa Choo/Simon Choo: Being Eurasian
  • Glenn D’Cruz: ‘Where Are You Coming From, Sir?’
  • Farida Tilbury: Hyphenated Realities: Growing up in an Indian-American-Bruneian Baha’i in ‘Multicultural’ Australia
  • Hsu-Ming Teo: Alien Asian in the Australian Nation
  • Ien Ang: Between Asia and the West.
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Midnight’s Orphans: Anglo-Indians in Post/Colonial Literature

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Monographs on 2011-10-17 21:22Z by Steven

Midnight’s Orphans: Anglo-Indians in Post/Colonial Literature

Peter Lang
2006
265 pages
Weight: 0.370 kg, 0.816 lbs
Paperback ISBN: 978-3-03910-848-0
Series: Studies in Asia-Pacific “Mixed Race”

Glenn D’Cruz, Senior Lecturer
School of Communication and Creative Arts
Deakin University, Australia

Anglo-Indians are the human legacy of European colonialism. These descendants of European men and Indian women regularly appear as disconsolate and degenerate figures in colonial and postcolonial literature, much to the chagrin of contemporary Anglo-Indians. Many significant writers, such as Rudyard Kipling, Maud Diver, John Masters, Salman Rushdie and Hari Kunzru, have created Anglo-Indian characters to represent the complex racial, social and political currents of India’s colonial past and postcolonial present.

This book is the first detailed study of Anglo-Indians in literature. Rather than simply dismissing the representation of Anglo-Indians in literary texts as offensive stereotypes, the book identifies the conditions for the emergence of these stereotypes through close readings of key novels, such as Bhowani Junction, Midnight’s Children and The Impressionist. It also examines the work of contemporary Anglo-Indian writers such as Allan Sealy and Christopher Cyrill.

Presenting a persuasive argument against ‘image criticism’, the book underscores the importance of contextualizing literary texts, and makes a timely contribution to debates about ‘mixed race’ identities, minoritarian literature and interculturalism.

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter One: Seven Deadly Stereotypes
  • Chapter Two: Regulating Bodies: Dangerous ‘Others’ and Colonial Governmentality
  • Chapter Three: Beyond the Pale: Imperial Power and Scientific Regimes of Truth
  • Chapter Four: The Poor Relation: Social Science and the Production of Anglo-Indian Identity
  • Chapter Five: Midnight’s Orphans: Stereotypes in Postcolonial Literature
  • Chapter Six: ‘The Good Australians’: Australian Multiculturalism and Anglo-Indian Literature
  • Chapter Seven: Conclusion: Bringing it all Back Home
  • Bibliography
  • Index
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Francophone Women: Between Visibility and Invisibility

Posted in Africa, Anthologies, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Women on 2010-09-04 22:34Z by Steven

Francophone Women: Between Visibility and Invisibility

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2010
146 pages
Hardback ISBN 978-1-4331-0803-7

Edited by

Cybelle H. McFadden, Assistant Professor of French
University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Sandrine F. Teixidor, Assistant Professor of French Studies
Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia

Francophone Women: Between Visibility and Invisibility underscores the writing of authors who foreground the female body and who write across geographical borders, as part of a global literary movement that has the French language as its common denominator. This edited collection exposes how female authors portray the tensions that exist between visibility and invisibility, public and private, presence and absence, and excess and restraint when it is linked to femininity and the female body.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Preface

  1. Corporeal Performance and Visible Gender Position in Colette’s The Pure and the Impure. Marion Krauthaker
  2. After-Images of Muslim Women: Vision, Voice, and Resistance in the Work of Assia Djebar. Mary Ellen Wolf
  3. The Gaze beneath the Veil: Portrait of Women in Algeria and Morocco. Sandrine F. Teixidor
  4. Vision, Voice, and the Female Body: Nina Bouraoui’s Sites/Sights of Resistance. Adrienne Angelo
  5. The MĂ©tis Body: Double Mirror. Caroline Beschea-Fache
  6. The Body, Sexuality, and the Photo in L’Usage de la photo. Cybelle H. McFadden

Contributors
Index

From: The MĂ©tis Body: Double Mirror

DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM? I AM THE ONE YOU CAN’T LEAVE ALONE.  The one who puzzles you, intrigues you.  I am the original definition of “exotic.” Acceptable in many ways, the cafe au lait of life, more palatable because I am diluted…  They call me white, they call me black… they’ve called me everything in between.
Camille Hernandez-Ramdwar

In their novels Garçon manquĂ© (2000) and 53cm (1999), Nina Bouraoui and Sandrine Bessora, respectively, portray characters born of parents belonging to different racialized groups and raise the issues defining mĂ©tissage.  As they form corporeal representation of the concept, they describe the mĂ©tis experience in the Francophone context.  The complexity of defining the concept of mĂ©tissage involves examining both races, since they shape the perception of the mĂ©tis by the Other and by the subject itself; it also entails discussing the racial tensions that play out in corporeal ways.  Using the work of Bouraoui and Bessora, I will analyze how the conception of a world based on dichotomies and binary oppositions, reinforced by racial categorization, affects and disturbs the construction of mĂ©tis identities in the texts…

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Taboo: Essays on Culture and Education

Posted in Anthologies, Arts, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2010-03-24 00:43Z by Steven

Taboo: Essays on Culture and Education

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2010
250 pages
Paparback ISBN: 978-1-4331-0840-2

Edited by:

Shirley R. Steinberg
McGill University

Lindsay Cornish

Taboo: Essays on Culture and Education is a collection of 15 compelling and controversial articles from the pages of Taboo: The Journal of Cultural Studies and Education. Scholars including Henry A. Giroux, Deborah P. Britzman, and Lawrence Grossberg explore intersections of race, gender, sexuality, social class, and power by examining cultural icons such as Forrest Gump and Borat, and social phenomena including cheerleading and the depiction of Jewish mothers on television. Taboo: Essays on Culture and Education is an indispensable resource for cultural studies scholars and students alike.

Table of Contents

  • Lawrence Grossberg: What’s in a Name (One More Time)
  • Deborah P. Britzman: What Is This Thing Called Love?
  • Aaron D. Gresson III: Postmodern America and the Multicultural Crisis: Reading Forrest Gump as the “Call Back to Whiteness”
  • Henry A. Giroux: Black, Bruised, and Read All Over: Public Intellectuals and the Politics of Race
  • Kurt Kors: The Scenography of HIV Infection for Young Gay Men: Educating Emotion and Desire
  • Kathalene A. Razzano: Tiger Woods: A Discursive Struggle over the Construction of a Multiracial Image
  • Awad Ibrahim: “Hey, Whadup Homeboy?” Identification, Desire, and Consumption Hip Hop, Performativity, and the Politics of Becoming Black
  • Molly Quinn: Getting Thrown Around: Little Girls and Cheerleading
  • Myrna Hant: TV Jewish Mothers: The Creation of a Multiethnic Antiheroine
  • Michelle Stack: Made for TV: Selling Kids’ Suffering and Creating Angels to Save Them
  • Priya Parmar: Cultural Studies and Rap: The Poetry of an Urban Lyricist
  • Eric J. Weiner: Constructions of Innocence in Times of War: Breaking into the Hegemony of Peace
  • Dennis Parsons: Almost Feminist: Truth, the Trope of the Writer, and the Male Gaze in Almost Famous
  • Roymieco A. Carter/Leila E. Villaverde: Laughing at Ourselves (in the Dark): Comedy and the Critical Reflections of Social Actions
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Zadie Smith: Critical Essays

Posted in Anthologies, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United Kingdom, Women on 2010-03-23 22:50Z by Steven

Zadie Smith: Critical Essays

Peter Lang Publishing Group
March 2008
221 pages
Paparback ISBN: 9978-0-8204-8806-6

Edited by:

Tracey L. Walters, Associate Professor of Literature
Stony Brook University

Zadie Smith: Critical Essays is a timely collection of critical articles examining how Zadie Smith‘s novels and short stories interrogate race, postcolonialism, and identity. Essays explore the various ways Smith approaches issues of race, either by deconstructing notions of race or interrogating the complexity of biracial identity; and how Smith takes on contemporary debates concerning notions of Britishness, Englishness, and Black Britishness. Some essays also consider the shifting identities adopted by those who identify with both British and West Indian, South Asian, or East Asian ancestry. Other essays explore Smith’s contemporary postcolonial approach to Britain’s colonial legacy, and the difference between how immigrants and first-generation British-born children deal with cultural alienation and displacement. This thought-provoking collection is a much-needed critical tool for students and researchers in both contemporary British literature and Diasporic literature and culture.

Table of Contents

  • Tracey L. Walters: Introduction
  • Matthew Paproth: The Flipping Coin: The Modernist and Postmodernist Zadie Smith
  • Ulka Anjaria: On Beauty and Being Postcolonial: Aesthetics and Form in Zadie Smith
  • Urszula Terentowicz-Fotyga: The Impossible Self and the Poetics of the Urban Hyperreal in Zadie Smith’s “The Autograph Man”
  • Maeve Tynan: “Only Connect”: Intertextuality and Identity in Zadie Smith’s “On Beauty”
  • Raphael Dalleo: Colonization in Reverse: “White Teeth” as Caribbean Novel
  • Susan Alice Fischer: “Gimme Shelter”: Zadie Smith’s “On Beauty”
  • Tracey L. Walters: Still Mammies and Hos: Stereotypical Images of Black Women in Zadie Smith’s Novels
  • Sharon Raynor: From the Dispossessed to the Decolonized: From Samuel Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners to Zadie Smith’s “Hanwell in Hell”
  • Lexi Stuckey: Red and Yellow, Black and White: Color-Blindness as Disillusionment in Zadie Smith’s “Hanwell in Hell”
  • Kris Knauer: The Root Canals of Zadie Smith: London’s Intergenerational Adaptation
  • Z. Esra Mirze: Fundamental Differences in Zadie Smith’s “White Teeth”
  • Katarzyna Jakubiak: Simulated Optimism: The International Marketing of “White Teeth”
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“Assimilating the Primitive”: Parallel Dialogues on Racial Miscegenation in Revolutionary Mexico

Posted in Anthropology, Books, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Mexico, Monographs on 2010-03-23 20:17Z by Steven

“Assimilating the Primitive”: Parallel Dialogues on Racial Miscegenation in Revolutionary Mexico

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2004
179 pages, 4 tables
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-8204-6322-3

Kelley R. Swarthout, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish
Colgate University, New York

This book examines the Mexican nationalist rhetoric that promoted race mixing as a cultural ideal, placing it within its broader contemporary polemic between vitalist and scientific thought. Part of its analysis compares the attitudes of anthropologist Manuel Gamio and educator José Vasconcelos with those of the European primitivist D. H. Lawrence, and concludes that although Gamio and Vasconcelos made lasting contributions to the construction of popular notions of mexicanidad, their paradigms were fatally flawed because they followed European prescriptions for the development of national identity. This ultimately reinforced the belief that indigenous cultural expression must be assimilated into the dominant mestizo culture in order for Mexico to progress. Consequently, these thinkers were unsuccessful in resolving the cultural dilemma Mexico suffered in the years immediately following the Revolution.

Table of Contents

  • List of Tables
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter 1: Theory
    • Primitive as a Western Construct
    • Science, Race, and the Nation
    • The Vitalist Opposition to Science
  • Chapter 2: The History
    • Mestizaje: Mexico’s National Myth
    • The Emergence of Racial Hybridity
    • Envisioning a Mestizo Middle Class
    • The Birth of Mexican Cultural Nationalism
  • Chapter 3: The Dialogue
    • Scientificism vs. Vitalism in Revolutionary Mexico
    • Manuel Gamio and Scientific Indigenism
    • Jose Vasconcelos and the Spiritual Renovation of Mexican Culture
    • D.H. Lawrence’s American Journey: A Pilgrimage to the “Indian Source”
  • Epilogue: Toward a Postmodern Mexican Identity
  • Bibliography
  • Index
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The Tragic Black Buck: Racial Masquerading in the American Literary Imagination

Posted in Books, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Monographs, Passing, United States on 2010-03-23 15:26Z by Steven

The Tragic Black Buck: Racial Masquerading in the American Literary Imagination

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2004
198 pages
ISBN: 978-0-8204-6206-6

Carlyle Van Thompson, Acting Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Education
Medgar Evers College, the City University of New York

The Tragic Black Buck examines the phenomenon, often paradoxical, of black males passing for white in American literature. Focusing on the first third of the twentieth century, this book argues that black individuals successfully assuming a white identity represent a paradox, in that passing for white exemplifies a challenge to the hegemonic philosophy of biological white supremacy, while denying blackness. Issues of race, gender, skin color, class, and law are examined in the literature of passing, involving the historical, theoretical, and literary tropes of miscegenation, mimicry, and masquerade. The narratives examined in The Tragic Black Buck are Charles Waddell Chesnutt‘s The House Behind the Cedars, James Weldon Johnson‘s The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s The Great Gatsby, and William Faulkner‘s Light in August.

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Census and Consensus? A Historical Examination of the US Census Racial Terminology Used for American Residents of African Ancestry

Posted in Books, Census/Demographics, History, Media Archive, Monographs, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science, United States on 2010-03-23 15:01Z by Steven

Census and Consensus? A Historical Examination of the US Census Racial Terminology Used for American Residents of African Ancestry

Peter Lang Publishing Group
2005-07-31
232 pages
20.6 x 14.7 x 1.5 cm
US-ISBN: 978-0-8204-7667-4

Iman Makeba Laversuch, Lecturer
University of Cologne, Germany

Colored, Black, Negro, Mulatto, Quadroon, Octoroon, African American. This book provides an in-depth analysis of the language policies governing the selection and application of the racial classifiers used by the United States Census for American residents of African ancestry over the past 200 years. The historical linguistic investigation is supplemented by a corpus of letters sent by the American public concerning not only the government’s controversial policies of racial designation, but also its methods of racial classification. Detailed demographic information about the evolving multicultural diversity of the US society is provided, along with a critical political discussion of the ways in which these sociological developments may effect the ways Americans define themselves.

Table of Contents

  • An Interdisciplinary Survey of Past Research on Racial Labeling
  • “Miscegenation”: The Historical Confound to the US Census System of Racial Classification for US Residents of African Ancestry
  • Strategies for Determining the Racial Classification of American Residents with African Ancestry
  • The Historical Inventory of Racial Ethnonyms
  • A Diachronic Analysis of the Individual Racial Ethnonyms from 1790 to 2000
  • A Diachronic Analysis of the System of Racial Labels
  • Identity Politics, Language Planning, and the US Census: The Costs and Benefits of Change.
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