Shifting Racial Subjectivities and Ideologies in Brazil

Posted in Articles, Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, Census/Demographics, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science on 2018-10-08 05:24Z by Steven

Shifting Racial Subjectivities and Ideologies in Brazil

Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World
First Published 2018-09-20
12 pages
DOI: 10.1177/2378023118797550

Stanley R. Bailey, Professor of Sociology
University of California, Irvine

Fabrício M. Fialho, Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre de Recherches Internationales, Sciences Po Paris, France

Census ethnoracial categories often reflect national ideologies and attendant subjectivities. Nonetheless, Brazilians frequently prefer the non-census terms moreno (brown) and negro (black), and both are core to antithetical ideologies: racial ambiguity versus racial affirmation. Their use may be in flux as Brazil recently adopted unprecedented race-targeted public policy. We examine propensities to self-classify as moreno and negro before and after the policy shift. Using regression modeling on national survey data from 1995 and 2008 that captured self-classification in open and closed formats, we find moreno is highly salient but increasingly constricted, while negro is restricted in use, though increasingly popular. Negro’s growth is mostly confined to the darker pole of Brazil’s color continuum. Education correlates in opposing directions: negative with moreno and positive with negro. Our findings proxy broad ideological shift from racial ambiguity to negro racial affirmation. They suggest race-targeted policy is transforming racial subjectivities and ideologies in Brazil.

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Racial and Ethnic Homogamy and Gendered Time on Core Housework

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2017-07-17 00:51Z by Steven

Racial and Ethnic Homogamy and Gendered Time on Core Housework

Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World
First Published 2016-11-21
15 pages
DOI: 10.1177/2378023116676277

Catherine Bolzendahl, Assistant Professor of Sociology
University of California, Irvine

Zoya Gubernskaya, Assistant Professor of Sociology
University at Albany, State University of New York

Racial/ethnic partner homogamy may contribute to gendered patterns in time on housework. To evaluate this, we pool 10 years of data from the American Time Use Survey and examine how time spent on housework varies by racial/ethnic homogamy across racial/ethnic groups and by gender. Interracial partnerships are more gender equitable, due to women spending less time on housework than women in homogamous relationships. Patterns vary by race/ethnicity; homogamy effects are strongest for Hispanic women but are also significant for Asian women. Homogamy has no significant effect among black or white respondents. Descriptive patterns by partner’s race/ethnicity reflect findings on biculturalism.

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