Seeking Participants: Experiences of People who have Biological Parents of Different Racial Backgrounds

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2016-03-15 02:20Z by Steven

Seeking Participants: Experiences of People who have Biological Parents of Different Racial Backgrounds

University at Albany, State University of New York
2016-03-14

Michael Gale

Experiences of racism have been found to be inversely linked to health and mental health among racial minority individuals, including those who identify as biracial or multiracial. Mixed race theorists have suggested that biracial adults with an integrated racial identity (i.e. viewing one’s own racial backgrounds as complementary and non-conflicting) may experience less pronounced ill-effects in association with encounters with racism. Thus, the goal of this study is to promote understanding and awareness of discrimination against biracial and multiracial individuals in the interest of anti-racism advocacy.

The study is expected to take about 20-30 minutes. To participate in this study, you need to:

  • Identify as biracial or multiracial or
  • Have biological parents who have different racial backgrounds from one another and
  • Be at least 18 years of age

To thank you for participating, you may choose to enroll in a drawing where you will have a chance to win a $25 Target gift card. One drawing will be held for every 20 participants up to 400 participants (20 gift cards). Your responses will be anonymous and confidential, and you may withdraw at any time with no penalties.

To participate in the study, click here.

If you have any questions, please contact Michael Gale at mgale@albany.edu, or his dissertation chair, Dr. Alex Pieterse, at apieterse@albany.edu.

This study is approved by University at Albany’s Institutional Review Board. All information that you provide will be anonymous. If you have questions about your rights as a participant, you may contact the Office of Regulatory Research Compliance at the University at Albany at 1-866-857-5459 or hsconcerns@albany.edu.

Tags: , , ,

346-Comparative Ethnic Literatures (Reg. No. 22253)

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Course Offerings, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United States on 2013-03-12 21:04Z by Steven

346-Comparative Ethnic Literatures (Reg. No. 22253)

University of Buffalo, The State University of New York
Spring 2013

Susan Muchshima Moynihan, Assistant Professor of English

This course brings together Asian American and African American texts to destabilize our understandings of race; to situate racial formations in political and historical moments marked by the intersections of race, class, gender, sexuality, and national and transnational affiliations; and to consider how literary strategies facilitate political engagement with these issues. The course will proceed in four parts.

Part I “Racial Ambiguity and the Dynamics of Passing” will engage Charles Chesnutt’s The House Behind the Cedars and short stories and essays by Edith Eaton (Sui Sin Far) and Winnifred Eaton (Onoto Watanna) to address how literary representations of the late-19th and early 20th centuries deployed mixed-race identities and attempts to pass within strict racial hierarchies marked by national and international politics…

For more information, click here.

Tags: , , , ,

Over the river and through the woods: Miscegenation and the American experiment

Posted in Dissertations, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United States on 2011-08-12 03:04Z by Steven

Over the river and through the woods: Miscegenation and the American experiment

State University of New York at Buffalo
2007
214 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3277744
ISBN: 9780549178705

Shelby Lucille Crosby

This dissertation examines how early American authors utilized the concept of miscegenation as a way to alter the American experiment. By invoking and exploring the paradox that Thomas Jefferson writes into existence with the Declaration of Independence and Notes on the State of Virginia, this dissertation seeks to illuminate the ways that early American authors were influenced by Jefferson’s paradoxical thoughts on race in America. How do these authors attempt to solve the Jeffersonian conundrum?

In chapter 1, “Practical Love: Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Miscegenation and Nation,” Child forwards miscegenation as a way to successfully combine Native American culture with Euro-American culture. In chapter 2, “The Body Politic and Cultural Miscegenation in Hope Leslie or, Early Times in the Massachusetts, ” I am intrigued by Sedgwick’s character, Magawisca. She becomes an agent of nation formation; it is through her that Hope learns self-control and composure. Ultimately, I interrogate Magawisca’s position in the nation state and her disappearance at the end of the novel.

In chapter three, “Challenging the Body Politic: William Wells Brown’s Clotel; or the President’s Daughter and Jeffersonian Republicanism” and chapter four, “‘This is my Gun’: Frank J. Webb’s Radical Black Domesticity,” I shift the discussion to African American literature and its use of miscegenation. In Clotel, William Wells Brown creates a fictionalized account of Thomas Jefferson’s African American descendants. Using Jeffersonian myth, Brown invokes the nation’s founding documents and develop mulatto characters that are the physically embodiment of the Jeffersonian paradox. And in chapter four I examine Webb’s use of domesticity and miscegenation as a way to forward a new black middle class that is capable of being free and, more importantly, being citizens.

A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the State University of New York at Buffalo in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy

Table of Contents

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: “Practical Love: Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Miscegenation and Nation”
  • Chapter 2: “The Body Politic and Cultural Miscegenation in Hope Leslie or, Early Times in the Massachusetts
  • Chapter 3: “Challenging the Body Politic: William Wells Brown’s Clotel; or the President’s Daughter and Jeffersonian Republicanism”
  • Chapter 4: “‘This is my Gun’: Frank J. Webb’s Radical Black Domesticity”
  • Conclusion
  • End Notes
  • Sources

Purchase the dissertation here.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Relation of multiracial identity statuses to psychosocial functioning and life satisfaction

Posted in Dissertations, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive on 2010-10-24 04:25Z by Steven

Relation of multiracial identity statuses to psychosocial functioning and life satisfaction

State University of New York, Albany
2007
129 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3272360
ISBN: 9780549120537

Krista Marguerite Damann

The current “multiracial baby boom” (i.e., the steady increase in this population as well as in the ability to identify them from census data) underscores the need for research on normative experiences of mixed race individuals. The current study, which tested the relation of multiracial identity statuses to psychosocial functioning, was based on the Multiracial-Heritage Awareness and Personal Affiliation (M-HAPA) theory of multiracial identity, developed by Choi-Misailidis (2004). This identity model consists of four multiracial identity statuses: (a) marginal, or lack of affiliation with any racial group, (b) singular, or the affiliation with one racial group to the exclusion of others, (c)  integrated-combinatory, or an identification that combines the racial heritages of both parents, and (d) integrated-universality, or a sense of connection with members of other racial groups. Specifically, the purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which the four multiracial identity statuses as defined in the M-HAPA theory differentially predicted self-reported self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, and social functioning in a national sample of nonclinical multiracial adults.

Results indicated that as a group, the four M-HAPA statuses significantly predicted substantial, unique proportions of variance in participants’ reported self-esteem, depression, life satisfaction, and social functioning, over and above various demographic factors (i.e., age, annual income, education level, marital status, and current mental health treatment). However, only two of the four identity statuses, marginal and integrated-combinatory, were uniquely associated with the criterion variables. As predicted, the marginal status was associated with relatively poorer psychosocial functioning, whereas the integrated-combinatory was associated with relatively better psychosocial functioning. Moreover, as predicted, no unique relationship was found between singular and levels of depression. As a group, the multiracial identity statuses accounted for the greatest variance in social functioning (21%).

All results are tempered by the mediocre fit of the data to the M-HAPA model, as indicated by a confirmatory factor analysis and by the small proportion of the sample endorsing “some agreement” with the marginal and singular identity statuses.

The results are discussed with respect to theory, research, and practice. Suggestions for further study of this understudied population are provided.

Purchase the dissertation here.

Tags: , , , , ,

Inside the Color Line: Reading Biracialism in Twentieth Century American Culture

Posted in Dissertations, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United States on 2010-10-15 17:27Z by Steven

Inside the Color Line: Reading Biracialism in Twentieth Century American Culture

State University of New York, Albany
2005
191 pages
Publication ID: AAT 3181801
ISBN: 9780542221538

Habiba Ibrahim, Assistant Professor of English
University of Washington

A Dissertation Submitted to the University at Albany, State University of New York in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (College of Arts & Sciences, Department of English)

This project is conceived as an exploration of myth and society with regard to racial ambiguity in twentieth century literature and film. It attempts to trace “mixed” racialism as it acts as an alibi for cultural phenomena including those surrounding the (truth and fiction of the) color line. Through an analysis of various moments in twentieth century American culture, this project seeks to demonstrate that racial mixedness has and continues to function as a sign under which the aporia of national self-definition finds expression

Table of Contents

Purchase the dissertation here.

Tags: ,