Biracial Sons More Likely Than Daughters To Identify As Black

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2016-02-04 02:18Z by Steven

Biracial Sons More Likely Than Daughters To Identify As Black

NBC News
2016-02-01

Aris Folley

Black-white biracial sons of interracial parents, in which one parent is black and the other is white, are more likely than their female counterparts to identify as black, according to a study found in the February issue of the American Sociological Review.

In a sample of more than 37,000 students from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman Survey, data pooled from the 2001, 2002, and 2003 surveys revealed that 76 percent of black-white biracial women identified as multiracial, whereas only 64 percent of black-white biracial men identified as multiracial.


A graph showing surveyed respondents’ self-identification by race. Source: American Sociological Review / American Sociological Review

“I argue that the different ways that biracial people are viewed by others influences how they see themselves,” said Lauren Davenport, an assistant political science professor at Stanford University who produced the study. “Biracial men may be more likely to be perceived as ‘people of color.'”…

Read the entire article here.

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Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling: The Fifth Minority

Posted in Books, Forthcoming Media, History, Identity Development/Psychology, Monographs, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science, Teaching Resources, United States on 2016-02-03 03:27Z by Steven

Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling: The Fifth Minority

Routledge
2016-02-26
256 pages
10 B/W Illus.
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-13-802191-4
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-13-802193-8

Sandra Winn Tutwiler, Professor of Education
Washburn University, Topeka, Kansas

This timely, in-depth examination of the educational experiences and needs of mixed-race children (“the fifth minority”) focuses on the four contexts that primarily influence learning and development: the family, school, community, and society-at-large.

The book provides foundational historical, social, political, and psychological information about mixed-race children and looks closely at their experiences in schools, their identity formation, and how schools can be made more supportive of their development and learning needs. Moving away from an essentialist discussion of mixed-race children, a wide variety of research is included. Life and schooling experiences of mixed-raced individuals are profiled throughout the text. Rather than pigeonholing children into a neat box of descriptions or providing ready made prescriptions for educators, Mixed-Race Youth and Schooling offers information and encourages teachers to critically reflect on how it is relevant to and helpful in their teaching/learning contexts.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part I: Being Mixed-Race in Society
    • Chapter 1: The Context of Race for Mixed-Race People
    • Chapter 2: Mixed-Race People in Society Over Time
    • Chapter 3: Racial Identity: Multiple Perspectives on Racial Self-Understanding
  • Part II: Family, Community, and Peers
    • Chapter 4: Structures, Practices, and Socialization in Interracial and Multiracial Families
    • Chapter 5: Community, Social Class and Sociocultural Interactions
    • Chapter 6: Peer Relations and Friendship Formations
  • Part III: Education and Schooling: People, Places, and Practices
    • Chapter 7: Teachers’ (Mixed) Race Constructions and Teaching in Multiracial Classrooms
    • Chapter 8: The Racial Context of Schooling and Mixed-race Youth
    • Chapter 9: Schooling Supportive of Mixed-Race Youth
  • Index
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Trauma and Race: A Lacanian Study of African American Racial Identity

Posted in Books, History, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Philosophy, Slavery, Social Science, United States on 2016-02-03 03:26Z by Steven

Trauma and Race: A Lacanian Study of African American Racial Identity

Baylor University Press
February 2016
190 pages
9in x 6in
Hardback ISBN: 9781602587342

Sheldon George, Professor of English
Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts

African American identity is racialized. And this racialized identity has animated and shaped political resistance to racism. Hidden, though, are the psychological implications of rooting identity in race, especially because American history is inseparable from the trauma of slavery.

In Trauma and Race author Sheldon George begins with the fact that African American racial identity is shaped by factors both historical and psychical. Employing the work of Jacques Lacan, George demonstrates how slavery is a psychic event repeated through the agencies of racism and inscribed in racial identity itself. The trauma of this past confronts the psychic lack that African American racial identity both conceals and traumatically unveils for the African American subject.

Trauma and Race investigates the vexed, ambivalent attachment of African Americans to their racial identity, exploring the ways in which such attachment is driven by traumatic, psychical urgencies that often compound or even exceed the political exigencies called forth by racism.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction: Race Today, or Alterity and Jouissance
  • 1. Race and Slavery: Theorizing Agencies beyond the Symbolic
  • 2. Conserving Race, Conserving Trauma: The Legacy of W. E. B. Du Bois
  • 3. Approaching the Thing of Slavery: Toni Morrison’s Beloved
  • 4. The Oedipal Complex and the Mythic Structure of Race: Ellison’s Juneteenth and Invisible Man
  • Conclusion: Beyond Race, or The Exaltation of Personality
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Dominican, Black, and Afro-Latino: A Confession/Dominicano, Negro, y Afro-Latino: Una Confesión

Posted in Anthropology, Articles, Autobiography, Caribbean/Latin America, Identity Development/Psychology, Latino Studies, Media Archive, United States on 2016-01-31 22:40Z by Steven

Dominican, Black, and Afro-Latino: A Confession/Dominicano, Negro, y Afro-Latino: Una Confesión

La Galería Magazine: Voices of the Dominican Diaspora
2015-04-10

Jonathan Bolívar Espinosa (Jay Espy)
Bronx, New York

“What? Black people in the Dominican Republic?” Yes amig@*, there are Black Dominican people whose ancestors descend from the African motherland. However, the question is not so much, “Are there Black people in the Dominican Republic?” as it is “Are Dominican people Black?” Ask that to a Dominican person and you might get cursed out. Contrary to popular belief, most Dominican people are in fact Black or African-descended, but Blackness tends to be defined in socially different ways depending on where you are in the world. For example, anyone from the United States who visits the Dominican Republic will find that most people there would qualify as Black if they lived in the states. Yet Dominican people see Blackness in a different way, and some of the most melanated Dominicans do not even claim their Blackness and instead default to “indio.” In reality, many Dominican people are as black as café, while others are as mixed as sancocho, as layered as cebollas, and a few as white as azúcar

…As a brown-skinned Dominican, the idea that I was somehow Black never crossed my mind. But what does it mean to be Black? Who is considered Black, and who is not? Am I Black? If I’m Dominican, can I be Black too? Am I Black enough? These are questions I struggled to answer as I embarked on a journey to come to terms with my European, Indigenous, and African ancestry and define my racial and cultural identity. Eventually, after deep study and reflection, I had discovered a racial and cultural fusion and finally admitted that I am the following: an Afro-Latino, or a Latino of African-descent, who identifies with their African roots; and an Afro-Dominican, which is simply a nationalized Afro-Latin@ identity. An Afro-Latin@ embraces four elements of African identity: their racial African features, like my thick, Black, curly afro; their cultural traits, which descend from African traditions such as music, food, language, and dance; their political identity, which is molded by their shared experience within a racist, anti-Black, system of white supremacy; and their social characteristics and personalities, which are African in nature. A Latin@ is simply someone mixed with African, European, and Indigenous blood…

Read the entire article here.

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Daughters of Interracial Couples are More Likely To Say They are Multiracial

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Identity Development/Psychology, Latino Studies, Media Archive, Religion, Social Science, United States, Women on 2016-01-28 22:55Z by Steven

Daughters of Interracial Couples are More Likely To Say They are Multiracial

TIME Magazine
2016-01-28

Carey Wallace

Study suggests it’s because they’re considered “intriguing.”

One of the fastest growing racial groups in the country isn’t a single racial group–it’s people from multiracial backgrounds, the children of interracial unions. A new study has found however, that young women are much more likely to call themselves multiracial than young men are.

Since 1967, when the Supreme Court declared state laws against interracial marriage unconstitutional in Loving vs.Virginia, the rate of interracial marriages in the United States has climbed from below one percent to 10% of all new marriages today.

And by 2050, as those numbers continue to rise, social scientists estimate that one out of every five Americans will be mixed-race.

How will this growing population choose to identify themselves? Will they embrace one parent’s background more than the other? Will they create a blend of the two? Or will they create something completely new?

To find out, Lauren Davenport, professor of political science at Stanford, sifted data from tens of thousands of incoming college freshmen with multi-racial backgrounds across the country…

Read the entire article here.

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The Role of Gender, Class, and Religion in Biracial Americans’ Racial Labeling Decisions

Posted in Articles, Economics, Identity Development/Psychology, Latino Studies, Media Archive, Religion, Social Science, United States, Women on 2016-01-28 19:10Z by Steven

The Role of Gender, Class, and Religion in Biracial Americans’ Racial Labeling Decisions

American Sociological Review
Volume 81, Number 1, February 2016
pages 57-84
DOI: 10.1177/0003122415623286

Lauren D. Davenport, Assistant Professor of Political Science
Stanford University

Racial attachments are understood to be socially constructed and endogenous to gender, socioeconomic, and religious identities. Yet we know surprisingly little about the effect of such identities on the particular racial labels that individuals self-select. In this article, I investigate how social identities shape the racial labels chosen by biracial individuals in the United States, a rapidly growing population who have multiple labeling options. Examining national surveys of more than 37,000 respondents of Latino-white, Asian-white, and black-white parentage, I disentangle how gender, socioeconomic status, and religious identity influence racial labeling decisions. Across biracial subgroups and net of all other influences, economic affluence and Jewish identity predict whiter self-identification, whereas belonging to a religion more commonly associated with racial minorities is associated with a minority identification. Gender, however, is the single best predictor of identification, with biracial women markedly more likely than biracial men to identify as multiracial. These findings help us better understand the contextual nature of racial identification and the processes via which social identities interact with racial meanings in the United States.

Read the entire article here or here.

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Voices from Mixed Asian America

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Autobiography, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Videos on 2016-01-28 15:53Z by Steven

Voices from Mixed Asian America

MJ Engel
Columbia University, New York, New York
2016-01-27

Hearing the unfiltered voices of the mixed Asian experience remains a novelty. “Voices from Mixed Asian America” is a compilation of interviews conducted with eight mixed race individuals. This series amplifies and connects the personal experiences of mixed Asian voices and issues. Each video is centered on a theme, from personal experiences of being othered and how being mixed race has factored into love lives to more general reflections on how mixed identities destabilize race as we know it.

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Can I Call My Nonbiological Twins Black Because My Husband Is?

Posted in Articles, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Philosophy, Social Science, United States on 2016-01-27 22:02Z by Steven

Can I Call My Nonbiological Twins Black Because My Husband Is?

The Ethicist
The New York Times Magazine
2016-01-27

Kwame Anthony Appiah, Professor of Philosophy, Law
New York University


Illustration by Tomi Um

I’m a Caucasian woman married to an African-American man. Shortly after we married, I discovered that I couldn’t conceive my own biological children. We opted to ‘‘adopt’’ two embryos. (Couples who have successfully undergone in-vitro fertilization and don’t wish to have more children can donate remaining embryos to other couples.) I was soon pregnant and gave birth to twins. Based on the records of the fertility clinic, we know that our children are genetically mixed Hispanic and Caucasian. I am not comfortable being open about the origin of my children, except with family and close friends, until they are old enough for me to explain it to them. However, several times in the last three years, I’ve been asked about their race, most recently on a pre-K school application form. On this form, there is no option of ‘‘mixed race’’ or ‘‘other.’’ Therefore, I identified my children as black. Was this the right choice? Name Withheld, Chicago

Ethics generally commends telling the truth. But in a situation in which our ordinary ways of thinking are at odds with reality, there can be no easy truth to be had. When it comes to race, confusion is the most intellectually defensible position. Let’s try to sow some. If your children were your biological children, many people in our society would say that they were African-American, because we have a tradition, going back before emancipation, of treating people with one black parent as black . . . or Negro or colored or whatever the favored term was at various times in American history. That’s the ‘‘one-drop rule,’’ so called because consistent application of it would mean that anyone with any African ancestry at all was black. (Of course, unbeknown to those who started this system, we all have African ancestry in the long run, which shows how much our thinking is shaped by our lack of knowledge.)…

As it happens, millions of Americans are black according to the one-drop rule but don’t have any of the features that people associate with African ancestry. Lots of them ‘‘pass’’ for white. Many don’t, though. Walter White, the early-20th-century leader of the N.A.A.C.P., was able to travel the South investigating lynchings because, although his parents were ex-slaves, he ‘‘looked white.’’ His autobiography begins: ‘‘I am a Negro. My skin is white, my eyes are blue, my hair is blond. The traits of my race are nowhere visible upon me.’’ (In a bio­pic, he could have been played by, oh, Bryan Cranston.) ‘‘ ’Cause it’s swell to have a leader/That can pass for white,’’ wrote Langston Hughes, who with his ‘‘copper-brown skin and straight black hair’’ — his description — was himself taken for white during a trip to Africa and could have passed for Indian if he troubled himself to do so…

Read the entire article here.

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Mixed but not matched: Being mixed-race in America

Posted in Articles, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2016-01-26 02:39Z by Steven

Mixed but not matched: Being mixed-race in America

The Daily Evergreen
Washington State University
Pullman, Washington
2016-01-21

Sophia Stephens, Evergreen columnist

The experience of being a mixed-race person in America can be described in one word – mixed.

Depending on how a mixed-race person looks and is perceived, the experience of being an ethnic or racially mixed person can vary the scope of a sociopolitical spectrum as broadly as one who identifies and is perceived as being mono-racial.

Race is a biological fantasy, but a social reality that affects the life experiences of millions of people every day in varying ways. There are some voices that dominate the conversation, some others that are beginning to gain traction, and others that are barely being heard at all or are being denied the opportunity to speak on their experiences…

…”For a long time I struggled with the fact that I wasn’t just one race,” said WSU junior Victoria-Pearl Young. “(I am) Native American (Choctaw and Comanche Nations), Chinese, French and black. This is incredibly difficult because my cultural experience as an Afro-Latina, specifically Afro-Boricua, living in America gets discredited simply because I don’t look like what people expect. I constantly have to prove myself racially and culturally. Here at WSU, most of my peers just assumed I was completely Black simply because of my appearance, and that really used to bother me until I learned more about my history as a black individual.”…

Read the entire article here.

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Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race

Posted in Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Social Science, Teaching Resources on 2016-01-25 17:04Z by Steven

Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race

Wiley
January 2015
304 pages
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-118-95872-8
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-119-24198-0
E-book ISBN: 978-1-118-95965-7

Derald Wing Sue, Professor of Psychology and Education
Columbia University, New York, New York

Turn Uncomfortable Conversations into Meaningful Dialogue

If you believe that talking about race is impolite, or that “colorblindness” is the preferred approach, you must read this book. Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence debunks the most pervasive myths using evidence, easy-to-understand examples, and practical tools.

This significant work answers all your questions about discussing race by covering:

  • Characteristics of typical, unproductive conversations on race
  • Tacit and explicit social rules related to talking about racial issues
  • Race-specific difficulties and misconceptions regarding race talk
  • Concrete advice for educators and parents on approaching race in a new way

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition
  • Acknowledgments
  • About the Author
  • SECTION ONE: THE CHARACTERISTICS, DYNAMICS, AND MEANING OF RACE TALK
    • CHAPTER ONE What Is Race Talk?
      • Race Talk Represents a Potential Clash of Racial Realities
      • Race Talk Pushes Emotional Hot Buttons
      • Race Talk Evokes Avoidance Strategies
      • Why Is Successful Race Talk Important?
    • CHAPTER TWO The Characteristics and Dynamics of Race Talk
      • What Are Characteristics of Race Talk?
      • How Do Societal Ground Rules (Norms) Impede Race Talk?
      • Why Is Race Talk So Difficult and Uncomfortable for Participants?
      • Conclusions
    • CHAPTER THREE The Stories We Tell: White Talk Versus Back Talk
      • Race Talk: Narratives and Counter-Narratives
      • Telling on Racism: Unmasking Ugly Secrets
  • SECTION TWO: THE CONSTRAINING GROUND RULES FOR RACE TALK
    • CHAPTER FOUR “The Entire World’s a Stage!”
      • The Politeness Protocol and Race Talk
      • The Academic Protocol and Race Talk
    • CHAPTER FIVE Color-Blind Means Color-Mute
      • Color-Evasion: “We Are All the Same Under the Skin”
      • Stereotype-Evasion: “I Don’t Believe in Those Stereotypes”
      • Power-Evasion: “Everyone Can Make It in Society, If They Work Hard Enough”
      • Myth of the Melting Pot
  • SECTION THREE: WHY IS IT DIFFICULT FOR PEOPLE OF COLOR TO HONESTLY TALK ABOUT RACE?
    • CHAPTER SIX “What Are the Consequences for Saying What I Mean?”
      • Ethnocentric Monoculturalism
      • Power and Oppression
    • CHAPTER SEVEN “To Speak or How to Speak, That Is the Question”
      • Communication Styles
      • Nonverbal Communication
      • Nonverbal Communication in Race Talk: Sociopolitical Considerations
      • Being Constrained and Silenced: Impact on People of Color
      • Conclusions
  • SECTION FOUR: WHY IS IT DIFFICULT FOR WHITE PEOPLE TO HONESTLY TALK ABOUT RACE?
    • CHAPTER EIGHT “I’m Not Racist!”
      • Cognitive Avoidance—Racism Denial
      • Emotional Avoidance—Fear, Guilt, and Other Feelings
      • Behavioral Avoidance—Helplessness and Hopelessness
      • Emotional Roadblocks to Race Talk
    • CHAPTER NINE “I’m Not White; I’m Italian!”
      • What Does It Mean to Be White?
      • The Invisibility of Whiteness: What Does It Mean?
      • The Fear of Owning White Privilege
      • Fear of Taking Personal Responsibility to End Racism: Moving From Being Nonracist to Becoming Antiracist
  • SECTION FIVE: RACE TALK AND SPECIAL GROUP CONSIDERATIONS
    • CHAPTER TEN Interracial/Interethnic Race Talk: Difficult Dialogues Between Groups of Color
      • Interracial/Interethnic Relationship Issues
      • Race Talk: Fears of Divide and Conquer
      • Sources of Conflict Between People of Color
    • CHAPTER ELEVEN Race Talk and White Racial Identity Development: For Whites Only
      • Developing a Nonracist and Antiracist Racial Identity
      • White Racial Identity Development and Race Talk
  • SECTION SIX: GUIDELINES, CONDITIONS, AND SOLUTIONS FOR HAVING HONEST RACIAL DIALOGUES
    • CHAPTER TWELVE Being an Agent of Change: Guidelines for Educators, Parents, and Trainers
      • Talking to Children About Race and Racism
      • Guidelines for Taking Personal Responsibility for Change
    • CHAPTER THIRTEEN Helping People Talk About Race: Facilitation Skills for Educators and Trainers
      • Ineffective Strategies: Five Things Not to Do
      • Successful Strategies: Eleven Potentially Positive Actions
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index
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