Seminar: Ideals of Miscegenation: Ethnicity, Sexuality, and the Chinese Ideology of “Region”

Posted in Anthropology, Asian Diaspora, Forthcoming Media, Live Events, Religion on 2016-11-27 15:22Z by Steven

Seminar: Ideals of Miscegenation: Ethnicity, Sexuality, and the Chinese Ideology of “Region”

University of Sydney
Old Teachers College
Room 310
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
2016-12-05, 14:00-15:30 AEDT (Local Time)

Ha Guangtian, Postdoctoral Research Fellow
SOAS China Institute, London, United Kingdom

While the word “miscegenation” normally carries a strongly negative connotation in the history of Western racial politics, in this talk, I use the word to describe an emergent political ideology in China that taps into the underlying assumption of one of the most essential state institutions in the governance of China’s ethnic minorities, namely, ethnic regional autonomy. Two aspects of this assumption will be the focus of my talk: its alleged facilitation of inter-ethnic and cross-cultural economic exchange and commercial flow on the one hand, and its often unspoken yet ever present intention in “consummating” this political economic arrangement with a correlated sexual arrangement, typified by inter-ethnic marriage, on the other. Rather than speaking merely at the general level, however, I choose to examine the ramifications and metamorphosis of this ideology among the elite Hui Muslim intellectuals, a group that include both university professors, think-tank researchers, and government officials. The Hui elites have been among the most enthusiastic proponents of this ideology, due particularly to their understanding of who the Hui are and how they came into being as an ethnic group. This historical presumption receives a new meaning under the “One Belt One Road” initiate. The presumptively “miscegenous” ethno-origin of the Hui is seen to offer them a critical edge in fostering a cross-cultural and cross-ethno-national perspective. This perspective, moreover, fits into a general ideology centred on a certain conception of “region” that is being formulated across different academic disciplines and political discourses in contemporary China. In many respects, this not only raises new issues of political re-alignment – or predictions of a new “great game” – in Eurasia, but also poses new challenges for theoretical critique. For the old criticism of racial, cultural, or ethnic essentialism, dear to leftist intellectuals in the 1980s and 1990s, is barely sufficient to address this new change – if anything, it plays right into its hands. By taking the Hui as an example, this talk tries to respond to this challenge at the level both of theory and of politics.

For more information, click here.

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The Color of American Genomics: Genetics in the Era of Racialized Medicine

Posted in Forthcoming Media, Health/Medicine/Genetics, Live Events, Politics/Public Policy, United States on 2016-11-26 22:49Z by Steven

The Color of American Genomics: Genetics in the Era of Racialized Medicine

University of California, Los Angeles
306 Royce Hall
340 Royce Drive
Los Angeles, California 90095
Friday, 2016-12-09, 13:30-16:30 PST (Local Time)

SPEAKERS:

Michael Montoya, Associate Professor
University of California, Irvine

Sandra Soo Jin Lee, Senior Research Scholar
Stanford University

Joan Donovan
University of California, Los Angeles

Élodie Grossi
University of California, Los Angeles/EPIDAPO

Since the 1960s, American ethno-racial categories have been increasingly used to respond to the inclusion of ethnic and racial minorities in biomedicine and genetics. It has been the researchers’ very dedication to the positive ideals of diversity and to the struggle against medical disparities that has paradoxically allowed racial categories to massively gain ground in science. This half-day symposium aims to shed light on the scope of racialized science and the political and ethical considerations raised by this new paradigm.

This workshop is free and open to the public

Presented by EPIDAPO.  Co-sponsored by the UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics.

For more information, click here.

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MacKay Lecture Series: “Living Race in the Post-Racial Era? Mixed Race Amnesia in Canada”

Posted in Canada, Live Events, Media Archive, Social Science on 2016-11-17 01:27Z by Steven

MacKay Lecture Series: “Living Race in the Post-Racial Era? Mixed Race Amnesia in Canada”

Dalhousie University
Room 127 Goldberg Computer Science Building
Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2
Thursday, 2016-11-17, 19:00 AST (Local Time)

Dr. Minelle Mahtani, Associate Professor of Human Geography and Program in Journalism
University of Toronto, Scarborough

Minelle Mahtani is the author of Mixed Race Amnesia: Resisting the Romanticization of Multiraciality (2014).

The annual MacKay Lecture Series features four lectures given by internationally renowned speakers, addressing subjects related to the liberal and performing arts. Three of the lectures revolve around a common interdisciplinary theme chosen each year by the Faculty’s Research Development Committee from a selection of faculty proposals. The fourth lecture is on a broadly based historical theme, in recognition of the generous donation funding the lecture series that was given by Gladys MacKay in appreciation of the education that her husband, the Reverend Malcolm Ross MacKay, received at Dalhousie as a B.A. student in History (1927).

For more information, click here.

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Being Blackanese: The Evolving Embrace of Self and Community

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Autobiography, Identity Development/Psychology, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2016-11-16 03:20Z by Steven

Being Blackanese: The Evolving Embrace of Self and Community

College of San Mateo
CSM College Center Building 10, Room 193
1700 West Hillsdale Boulevard
San Mateo, California 94402 USA
Friday 2016-11-18, 18:30 PST (Local Time)

Being Blackanese: The Evolving Embrace of Self and Community brings together an award winning literary artist, a scholar activist, and an independently published author in an examination and affirmation of Black Japanese American life. The “Blackanese” experience – of a world where divisiveness remains common and cultural ambiguity can equate to invisibility within one’s own communities – will be exposed through readings, presentations and Q&A.

Featuring readings and presentations by:

  • Alyss Dixson will read from “The Club”, her short fiction piece about Ai, a determined Black Japanese girl who decides to sneak a ride on her father’s old Harley until an encounter with a thief puts her between fear of the stranger and fear of her dad’s punishment.
  • Fredrick Cloyd will read selections from his memoir, Dream of the Water Children: Memory and Mourning in the Black Pacific, covering his struggles as a half-Black Japanese boy born of an African American military father and that of his mother who was looked down upon for having a child by an American, as well as his life as an Amerasian after migrating to the United States.
  • Ramon Calhoun will read excerpts from his independently-published novel, Blackanese Boy, the coming of age story of Rafael Halifax. Raised by a single mother, Rafael tries to cope with and understand the complexity of his mixed-identity, born of his Japanese American mother and Black father, an infrequent yet powerful presence in his life.

The readings will be followed by a Question & Answer session facilitated by Dr. Frederick Gaines, Chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies, College of San Mateo.

For more information, click here.

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The New Biopolitics of Race, Health, and Justice

Posted in Health/Medicine/Genetics, Law, Live Events, Media Archive, Social Justice, United States on 2016-11-07 01:32Z by Steven

The New Biopolitics of Race, Health, and Justice

Center For Health and Wellbeing
Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
001 Robertson Hall
Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
Friday, 2016-11-11, 12:00-13:30 EST (Local Time)

Dorothy Roberts, George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology and the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights
University of Pennsylvania

Dorothy Roberts, an acclaimed scholar of race, gender and the law, joined the University of Pennsylvania as its 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Sociology and the Law School where she also holds the inaugural Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mosell Alexander chair.

Her pathbreaking work in law and public policy focuses on urgent contemporary issues in health, social justice, and bioethics, especially as they impact the lives of women, children and African-Americans. Her major books include Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century (New Press, 2011); Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books, 2002), and Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Pantheon, 1997). She is the author of more than 80 scholarly articles and book chapters, as well as a co-editor of six books on such topics as constitutional law and women and the law.

For more information, click here.

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Creative Self-Studio: Social Justice Storytelling

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Live Events, Media Archive, Social Justice, United States on 2016-10-26 01:36Z by Steven

Creative Self-Studio: Social Justice Storytelling

DePaul University Student Center (Lincoln Park)
Room 120 AB
2250 N Sheffield Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
Tuesday, 2016-10-25 09:40-11:10 CDT (Local Time)

Aisha Fukushima will discuss the role of the emcee in hip-hop culture as a story-teller and learn how hip hop story-telling can be used to critically explore questions of identity, inequality and liberation. Using creative techniques such as body percussion, attendees will practice solidarity building through movement. All levels of musical interest and experience welcome.

For more information, click here.

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An Intimate Look at Race: Growing Up Biracial in a Racially Torn World

Posted in Autobiography, Identity Development/Psychology, Live Events, Media Archive, United Kingdom on 2016-10-22 20:02Z by Steven

An Intimate Look at Race: Growing Up Biracial in a Racially Torn World

Wellesley Centers for Women
Book Reading \ Panel \ Conversation with Author Sil Lai Abrams
Clapp Library, Lecture Room
Wellesley College
106 Central Street
Wellesley, Massachusetts
Tuesday, 2016-10-25, 16:30-17:00 EST (Local Time)

Presenters: Author Sil Lai Abrams with Linda Charmaraman, Ph.D., Layli Maparyan, Ph.D., Linda M. Williams, Ph.D.

For more information, click here.

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Speaker Series: Memory, History, Race, and America’s National Parks

Posted in History, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2016-10-16 21:15Z by Steven

Speaker Series: Memory, History, Race, and America’s National Parks

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
515 Malcolm X Boulevard
New York, New York 10037
Tuesday, 2016-10-18, 18:00-20:00 EDT (Local Time)

As a young girl Lauret Savoy developed a deeply personal connection to the American land, visiting numerous national parks with her parents. But as she traversed the well-worn paths of Yellowstone, Bryce Canyon and Zion, she began to wonder about the footsteps of her ancestors, and how they marked the very land she walked upon. From the Buffalo Soldiers who safeguarded Yosemite and Sequoia to the painful legacy of Japanese-American internment camps, national parks hold some of the most important yet muted narratives of the American identity.

In her newest work, Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape, Savoy explores how the country’s still unfolding history, and ideas of “race,” mark a person, a people, and the land. In distinctive and illuminating prose, she weaves together human stories of migration, silence, and displacement, as epic as the continent they survey, with uplifted mountains, braided streams, and eroded canyons.

Join Alan Spears for a conversation with [National Parks Conservation Association] NPCA Trustee Lauret Savoy about her journeys across the American Landscape and the oft forgotten stories of the places we cherish and call our national parks. She will challenge you to redefine current concepts regarding the meaning of public lands and their place in our shared history…

For more information, click here.

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One Drop of Love is Headed to Broadway!

Posted in Arts, Autobiography, Census/Demographics, History, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2016-10-15 00:51Z by Steven

One Drop of Love is Headed to Broadway!

Theater Row
410 West 42nd Street (between 9th and 10th Avenues)
New York, New York 10036
Thursday, 2016-10-13, 19:30 EDT (Local Time) Sold Out!
Sunday, 2016-10-16, 14:00 EDT (Local Time)

How does our belief in ‘race’ affect our most intimate relationships? One Drop of Love travels near and far, in the past and present to explore family, race, love and pain – and a path towards reconciliation. It is produced by Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni, Ben Affleck and Matt Damon.

One Drop of Love is headed to Broadway as part of the 7th Annual United Solo Theatre Festival on Thursday, October 16th. Show starts promptly at 2:00 pm. No late seating. General admission $23.25.

When purchasing tickets from the Telecharge website, be certain you’ve chosen Sunday, October 16th at 2:00PM. See you there – bring friends!

Ticketholders are invited to a celebration and discussion with Fanshen at nearby Chez Josephine following the performance.

Purchase tickets here.

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GONS-FA16.03 | Transcending Race

Posted in Live Events, Media Archive, Philosophy, United States on 2016-10-08 01:12Z by Steven

GONS-FA16.03 | Transcending Race

GONS – Gonson Society Lecture Series
The Cambridge Center for Adult Education
42 Brattle Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
2016-10-12, 11:00 EDT (Local Time)

Carlos Hoyt

Based on Carlos Hoyt’s recently published book, The Arc of a Bad Idea: Understanding and Transcending Race, will provide a penetrating, provocative, and promising analysis and alternative to the hegemonic racial world-view. How race came about, how it evolved into a natural-seeming aspect of human identity, and how racialization, as a habit of the mind, can be broken is presented through the unique and corrective framing of race as a time-bound (versus eternal) concept, the lifespan of which is traceable and the demise of which is predictable.

For more information, click here.

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