A Qualitative Examination of Multiracial Students’ Coping Responses to Experiences with Prejudice and Discrimination in College

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Media Archive, United States on 2015-06-08 00:53Z by Steven

A Qualitative Examination of Multiracial Students’ Coping Responses to Experiences with Prejudice and Discrimination in College

Journal of College Student Development
Volume 56, Number 4, May 2015
pages 331-348
DOI: 10.1353/csd.2015.0041

Samuel D. Museus, Associate Professor of Higher Education
Morgridge College of Education
University of Denver

Susan A. Lambe Sariñana, Clinical Psychologist
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Tasha Kawamata Ryan

National data indicate that multiracial individuals comprise a substantial and growing proportion of the US population, but this community is often invisible in higher education research and discourse. This study aims to increase knowledge of mixed-race students in higher education by examining the ways in which they cope with experienced prejudice and discrimination in college. Findings indicate that multiracial college students cope with prejudice and discrimination by educating others about multiracial issues, utilizing support networks, embracing fluidity of multiracial identity, and avoiding confrontation with sources of prejudice and discrimination. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

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Engaging in the margins: Exploring differences in biracial students’ engagement by racial/ethnic makeup

Posted in Campus Life, Media Archive, United States on 2015-06-07 18:28Z by Steven

Engaging in the margins: Exploring differences in biracial students’ engagement by racial/ethnic makeup

Paper presented at the 2014 Association for the Study of Higher Education Conference
Washington, D.C.
November 2014
36 pages

Jessica C. Harris
Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research

Allison BrckaLorenz, Assistant Research Scientist
Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research

Thomas F. Nelson Laird, Associate Professor of Education
Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research

Introduction

The population of Americans who claim more than one racial background continues to grow at a drastic rate (Jones, 2005; Jones & Smith, 2001), resulting in an increasingly visible and active multiracial nation (Root, 1996). Results from the 2000 U.S. Census indicated that 7.3 million respondents checked more than one racial box (Jones, 2005). This growth has a direct impact on U.S. higher education as the median age of these “more than one race” individuals was reported at 23.4 years, signifying that the nation’s multiracial population is disproportionately young (Jones, 2005). This average age suggests that large portions of multiracial Americans are currently pursuing, or are headed toward the pursuit of higher education. Unfortunately, even with these demographics in mind, higher education scholarship and practice that centers on multiracial students remains stagnant and sparse leaving the field uniformed about this population (Museus, Sariñana, & Ryan, in press).

One of the main reasons multiracial students continue to be pushed to the margins of education is attributable to socio-historical understandings of race in America. Historically, race has been constructed within monoracial categories (Delgado & Stefancic, 2011) resulting in a lack of vocabulary and mechanisms that take into account those who exist outside of monoracial structures. These racial understandings inform traditional norms of data collection and analysis in which higher education researchers often re-categorize biracial students as monoracial or leave them out of studies altogether (Padilla & Kelley, 2005). This re-categorization or dropping of biracial students leaves educators uninformed “about the size or nature of their multiracial population, leaving them completely unable to address a rapidly growing group of students that has unique and specific needs” (Padilla & Kelley, 2005, p. 11). Scholars (see Renn, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2008; King, 2011; Rockquemore & Brunsma, 2008) have begun to take a deeper interest in identity development for multiracial college students. However, this one-sided focus eclipses multiracial students’ experiences outside of identity development leaving the field largely uniformed about other realities and experiences of multiracial students (Museus, Sariñana & Ryan, in press; Osei-Kofi, 2012) such as their academic achievement, sense of belonging on campus, and engagement in college, to name a few.

To address gaps in the literature and add to higher education scholars’ and practitioners’ knowledge of multiracial students outside of identity development, we focused this paper on student engagement for biracial students. Engagement is a critical topic that builds a foundational understanding of and guides future research on biracial students. For instance, engagement literature informs understandings of college transitions (Cabrera, Nora, Terenzini, Pascarella, & Hagerdorn, 1999), moral development (Evans, 1987), and persistence (Astin, 1975, 1993; Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005; Stage & Hossler, 2000; Tinto, 1975) amongst students. The lack of focus on engagement for multiracial students is alarming as scholars link student engagement to student development (Astin, 1993; Pascarella & Terenzini, 2005). The concept of engagement provides “practitioners with a framework for understanding and fostering student learning and success and also offer cues for developing rich contexts for student learning and development” (Wolf-Wendel, Ward, & Kinzie, 2009, 420-421). Therefore, understanding biracial students’ engagement practices may inform and lead to better understandings of the plethora of scholarship that exists on biracial students’ racial identity development as well as other critical aspects of student development.

An increasing amount of higher education literature demonstrates differences in engagement for monoracial students of color (see Harper, Carini, Bridges, & Hayek, 2004; Hawkins & Larabee, 2009). However, research on biracial student engagement remains scarce. The purpose of this research is to add to the limited scholarship on multiracial students by exploring the “rapidly growing population” of biracial college students. We shed light on who the biracial population is in U.S. higher education and how these students engage when compared to their monoracial peers, and to one another. Findings from this study expose the nuances of engagement for biracial students when controlling for racial makeup, subsequently problematizing the conceptualization of biracial students as a monolithic group. Moreover, by documenting who biracial students are and how they engage, this study builds a strong foundation for future explorations of the intricacies of multiraciality and multiracial student engagement in college…

Read the entire paper here.

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University of Salford installs new Chancellor, Professor Jackie Kay MBE

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Media Archive, United Kingdom on 2015-06-03 21:06Z by Steven

University of Salford installs new Chancellor, Professor Jackie Kay MBE

University of Salford
Salford, United Kingdom
Friday, 2015-05-01

The University celebrated the official installation of it’s sixth Chancellor, renowned poet Professor Jackie Kay MBE, at a grand ceremony in Peel Hall on Wednesday 29 April 2015.

Jackie Kay MBE was formally initiated in a ceremony that saw celebrated Accrington writer Jeanette Winterson and Salford City Mayor Ian Stewart sing the praises of the renowned Scottish poet who will now head up the university.

The role of Chancellor will see distinguished, award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and plays act as the ceremonial head of the institution and play an important part in representing the University of Salford and supporting the work of students and the wider community.

In addition to her role as Chancellor, Jackie will also take up the position of University ‘Writer in Residence.’ This role involves contributing major commissions to enhance learning and teaching, and broaden the students’ experience at the University…

…Jackie has published five collections of poetry for adults and several for children. Jackie’s first book of poetry, The Adoption Papers won the Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year and a commendation from the Forward Poetry Prize judges.

Her other awards include the Guardian First Book Award Fiction Prize for her celebrated first novel Trumpet and the Somerset Maugham Award for Other Lovers.

She also writes extensively for the stage and screen. Her play Twice Over was the first by a Black writer to be produced by Gay Sweatshop Theatre Group in 1988. Her plays have been performed at The Royal Exchange and more recently she wrote Manchester Lines for the Library Theatre.

Her drama The Lamplighter looks in depth at the Atlantic slave trade and was broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and published by Bloodaxe.

Jackie has lived in Manchester for over 15 years and is Cultural Fellow at Glasgow Caledonian University. Jackie is Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Newcastle and her 2010 book Red Dust Road is currently being made into a play for television…

Read the entire article here.

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University of Salford officially appoints renowned poet Professor Jackie Kay as their new chancellor

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Media Archive, United Kingdom on 2015-06-03 20:40Z by Steven

University of Salford officially appoints renowned poet Professor Jackie Kay as their new chancellor

Manchester Evening News
Manchester, England
2015-05-09

Charlotte Dobson, Social Affairs Reporter


Prof Jackie Kay MBE appointed as the Chancellor of the University of Salford

Professor Jackie Kay MBE was formally initiated at a ceremony attended by fellow celebrated writer Jeanette Winterson on Wednesday.

A celebrated poet has been appointed as the Chancellor of the University of Salford.

Prof Jackie Kay MBE, an award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and plays, said it was an honour to be chosen for the role.

Prof Kay will also take up the position of university writer in residence.

Prof Kay said: “I feel honoured to have been chosen as the new chancellor for the University of Salford and look forward to being a hands-on chancellor, as well as a ‘shaking hands’ chancellor…

Read the entire article here.

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Schools for European and Eurasian children in India: Making of the official policy in colonial India and its contemporary significance

Posted in Articles, Asian Diaspora, Campus Life, History, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy on 2015-06-01 18:48Z by Steven

Schools for European and Eurasian children in India: Making of the official policy in colonial India and its contemporary significance

Policy Futures in Education
Volume 13, Number 3 (April 2015)
pages 315-327
DOI: 10.1177/1478210315569040

Heeral Chhabra, M.Phil Research Scholar
Department of History
University of Delhi, India

The history of education in India has been looked into with a view which has been narrow in its expanse, often missing out on many social categories which had a relatively limited, yet important, presence in colonial India. Sufficient attention has been paid to the official policies of the British Indian government (starting from Macaulay’s Minute). However, a critical analysis of it is assumed to be provided by the nationalist discourse, which is popularly perceived as almost an antithesis of colonial education. In the entire process, the discussion on education broadly gets limited to two sections – the ruler and the ruled, thereby eschewing the diversity within the realm of those seeking and providing education. In this paper, an attempt will be made to understand the emerging importance of ‘Europeans and Eurasians’ as a social category with a peculiar position in colonial India. Though technically part of the ruling ‘race’, their economic standing was not always congruent with their assumed racial superiority. Termed as ‘poor whites’ their presence in India posed challenges to the British government especially after the 1857 mutiny. Employed in the ‘communication network’ of the British Raj, their presence in postal, railways and telegraph departments was imperative for its successful working. The first part of the paper seeks to explore the making of these European and Eurasian communities in India. An official stand regarding schooling of European and Eurasian children was formulated for the first time through Canning’s Minute of 29 October 1860. Analysis of this Minute is vital to understand the very nature of education extended along with religious overtones providing these schools with a distinct identity and status. Using archival sources, this paper seeks to explore the making of distinct schools for them at hill stations and in the plains. Many of these hill schools still exist and have become a symbol of ‘modernity’. Quite ironically their association with the colonial past provides them with a certain elite reputation in independent India (where nationalism is closely tied to education). Analysis of this opens up scope to investigate the ways in which ‘modernity’ is not only understood but professed and adapted through such an educational setup.

Read or purchase the article here.

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#471: Mixed Race in a Box: Teaching Mixed Race in the 21st Century

Posted in Campus Life, Live Events, Media Archive, Teaching Resources, United States on 2015-05-29 19:14Z by Steven

#471: Mixed Race in a Box: Teaching Mixed Race in the 21st Century

The 28th Annual National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education (NCORE)
Washington Hilton
1919 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20009
2015-05-26 through 2015-05-30

Friday, 2015-05-29, 15:30-17:30 EDT (Local Time)

In Fall 2013, The Asian American Literary Review published Mixed Race in a Box, a multimedia project equal parts art piece, anthology, and innovative educational tool. It has since been adopted as a course text for teaching race and mixed race in over 80 college and university classrooms in 6 countries—the U.S., Ireland, Argentina, Hong Kong, Poland, and Germany.

Popular consciousness of “multiracialism” is at an all-time high, and with it, student (and faculty) needs for reflecting personally and academically on mixed identities and the histories and realities of mixed race. But what exactly does it mean to teach mixed race? What are we teaching, and how, and why? Where—in what disciplines? And who are we teaching—what understandings of race and mixed race are our students, across the U.S. and beyond, bringing into the classroom?

This proposed session will outline Mixed Race in a Box as a pedagogical experiment, opening to a larger discussion of teaching mixed race and race more generally. It will explore how we can best equip students and teachers to think critically about race while, as the saying goes, “meeting them where they are.” Produced by an editorial team of University of Maryland students, featuring collaborative projects by leading artists, scholars, poets, and writers, the Box includes a range of unusual materials—a foldout map of mixed Native poetics, a deck of playing cards, three pocket books, photo slideshows and video art—and offers a wealth of different approaches to teaching race and mixed race. The session will examine some of these particular strategies and discuss the challenges and successes of employing them in various classrooms, with varying student constituencies, across the country. Prospective presenters will include a senior editor of the Box, a student editor of the Box, and two scholar-writers who contributed pieces to the Box and taught it in their respective classrooms.

Presenters

Jennifer Kwon Dobbs
St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota

Zohra Saed
Hunter College, City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York

Lawrence-Minh Davis, Director
Asian American Literary Review, College Park, Maryland

Andrew Mayton
University of Maryland, College Park

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#312: Mixed Foundations: Supporting and Empowering Multiracial Student Organizations

Posted in Campus Life, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2015-05-28 12:09Z by Steven

#312: Mixed Foundations: Supporting and Empowering Multiracial Student Organizations

The 28th Annual National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education (NCORE)
Washington Hilton
1919 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20009
2015-05-26 through 2015-05-30

Thursday, 2015-05-28, 08:30-10:00

Multiracial college students face pervasive monoracist attitudes and structural oppression. These students, like many students from historically marginalized backgrounds, experience greater satisfaction and retention rates when their identities are understood and their needs accommodated. This session will focus on supporting and empowering multiracial students and mixed race student organizations on college campuses. Presenters will utilize student affairs research and identity development theory to address common challenges that multiracial organizations face and how to effectively confront them. Participants will learn about the importance of creating inclusive spaces for multiracial students, equipping them with strong leadership skills, and advising them through political and administrative hurdles.

Presenters

Victoria Malaney, Special Assistant to the Dean of Students
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Kendra Danowski, Program Coordinator for Civic Engagement & Social Justice
Eugene Language College, New York, New York

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#119: Moving “Multiracial” from the Margins: Theoretical and Practical Innovations for Serving Mixed Race Students

Posted in Campus Life, Live Events, Media Archive, Teaching Resources, United States on 2015-05-25 01:29Z by Steven

#119: Moving “Multiracial” from the Margins: Theoretical and Practical Innovations for Serving Mixed Race Students

The 28th Annual National Conference on Race & Ethnicity in American Higher Education (NCORE)
Washington Hilton
1919 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20009
2015-05-26 through 2015-05-30

Part I: Tuesday, 08:30-11:30 EDT (Local Time)
Part II: Tuesday, 13:00-17:30 EDT (Local Time)

Despite evidence from the 2010 U.S. Census that multiracial youth are the fastest growing demographic in the nation, multiraciality continues to be on the margins of the discourse on race and racism in higher education theory and practice. This two-part institute invites educators from all backgrounds and expertise levels to engage in deep learning about the complexities of serving multiracially-identified students. After briefly reviewing contemporary models of multiracial identity and development, presenters will focus on better understanding the contexts shaping and complicating such models. Further, the institute will focus on theoretical innovations that help to move of understanding of multiraciality forward, including systems of oppression and models for assessing the campus climate for multiracial students. The latter part of the institute will focus on applying theories to practice and working through hands-on issues related to serving multiracial students. Throughout the institute, contradictions in the popular discourse about multiraciality and recent controversies will be presented for participants to engage in critical thinking about their own potential biases (i.e., self-work) as well as how to educate others toward creating more inclusive contexts for multiracial students. Additionally, a range of activities, including presentations, journaling, and small- and large-group discussions, will be used to allow participants to actively engage throughout the institute.

Pre-Conference Institute

This institute will:

  • Contextualize current approaches to supporting the healthy identity development of multiracial people;
  • Explicitly connect the discourse on multiracial identity to monoracism, a system of oppression related to traditional racism that marginalizes those who do not adhere to society’s promotion of discrete monoracial categories (Johnston and Nadal, 2010);
  • Include multiraciality in larger efforts aimed at obtaining racial equality in higher education; and
  • Provide ample opportunities for in-depth discussions of the complexities of serving multiracial students to assist participants in evaluating and growing their own institution’s service to multiracial students.

Presenters

Marc Johnston, Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Studies
Ohio State University

Eric Hamako, Assistant Professor
Department Equity & Social Justice Program
Shoreline Community College, Shoreline, Washington

Natasha Chapman, Assistant Professor
West Virginia University

Victoria Malaney, Special Assistant to the Dean of Students
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

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Welcome to Seattle Public Schools. What race are you?

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Family/Parenting, Media Archive, United States on 2015-05-06 16:12Z by Steven

Welcome to Seattle Public Schools. What race are you?

The Seattle Globalist
Seattle, Washington
2015-05-05

Sharon H. Chang

“Welcome to Seattle Public Schools!” it reads happily. I’m cheerfully advised to use a checklist following to help me enroll my child in kindergarten.

Okay, I think. No problem. My eyes scroll down the checklist: Admission Form, Certificate of Immunization Status, Special Education Form, and School Choice Form. Got it.

I start filling in the Admission Form. It doesn’t take long to get to page 3, “Student Ethnicity and Race”:

“INSTRUCTIONS: This form is to be filled out by the student’s parents or guardians, and both questions must be answered. Part A asks about the student’s ethnicity and Part B asks about the student’s race.”

I heave a huge inward sigh and put the paper aside for the day. Maybe I’ll come back to that one tomorrow, I reflect. But I don’t. I don’t come back to it for at least a week. Actually probably more like two weeks.

This is part of the process of enrolling your child in Seattle Public Schools (SPS). You have to state your child’s race and ethnicity. It’s not optional. And there is an entire one-page form dedicated to that declaration, which in my mind shows the clear significance of labeling a child’s so-called race and ethnicity to the district.

Given that my partner and I are both mixed-race identifying and have endured a lifetime of checking boxes that (hold your breath) might or might not fit, I find these types of forms exhausting. One, they never fit anyone and everyone just right. Two, they are generally and perpetually confusing. Three, they are almost always deeply racializing — they make us feel our bodies are “raced” whether we want to or not. And four, they are pretty suspect in their intentions.

Read the entire article here.

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Ticking the box: Finding a place for mixed race

Posted in Articles, Asian Diaspora, Campus Life, Media Archive, United Kingdom, United States on 2015-04-27 21:44Z by Steven

Ticking the box: Finding a place for mixed race

The Cambridge Student
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
2015-04-25

Chase Caldwell Smith

In my life, I have been told many things – that I “look like a bit of a foreigner” or that “I couldn’t tell you were part-Asian before – I can definitely see it now.” I’ve been informed, jokingly, that I’m basically “the blackest person” in the room, or told, imaginatively, that “all Asians look alike” anyway. Or my personal favourite, that because my mother is Asian and my father white, that I “live in one of those kinds of families.”

There’s much talk about race in Cambridge, with the establishment of FLY two years ago igniting a much-needed debate on how we should discuss racial discrimination in a university as multicultural as our own. I know for a fact that other students have been forced to confront much more discrimination than the little I have faced. But I still can’t help feeling that sometimes, much of the debate over race seems to pitch a cut-and-dry privileged majority, usually white, against a generalized group of underprivileged minorities, usually non-white. The issues dividing these groups are painfully real: I am not in any way refuting this.

However, I am concerned that this debate between a clearly delineated majority and minority has the unintended consequence of leaving out the voices of the students in-between – people like me who are neither all-white nor all-Asian, for example. It is sometimes difficult to take part because we don’t fit into the existing scheme of privilege and oppression: we are constantly uncertain of which ‘category’ we fit into, and perhaps, should fit into…

Read the entire article here.

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