One Drop of Love preceded by I’ve Just had a Dream

Posted in Arts, Forthcoming Media, Live Events, United States, Videos on 2016-06-22 16:31Z by Steven

One Drop of Love preceded by I’ve Just had a Dream

The 18th Annual Roxbury International Film Festival
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Barbara and Theodore Alfond Auditorium (Auditorium G36)
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts 02115
2016-06-30, 20:00-21:35 EDT (Local Time)


Film still from One Drop of Love

I’ve Just had a Dream by Javi Navarro (USA, 2014, 7 min.). Two girls. Two cultures. Two visions. A dream. They say that dreams are only dreams; the only thing that makes them different is the person who dreams.

One Drop of Love by Carol Banker, written and produced by Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni (USA, 2016, 67 min.). One Drop of Love is the feature film of a multimedia solo performance by Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni. Produced by Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni, Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, this extraordinary one-woman show incorporates filmed images, photographs and animation to tell the story of how the notion of ‘race’ came to be in the United States and how it affects our most intimate relationships. A moving memoir, One Drop takes audiences from the 1700s to the present, to cities all over the U.S. and to West and East Africa, where the narrator and her family spent time in search of their ‘racial’ roots. The ultimate goal of the show is to encourage everyone to discuss ‘race’ and racism openly and critically.

Followed by a discussion with the filmmakers.

For more information, click here.

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Go Off!: Amandla Stenberg on Intersectionality and the Impact of White Supremacy

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, United States, Videos, Women on 2016-06-21 20:08Z by Steven

Go Off!: Amandla Stenberg on Intersectionality and the Impact of White Supremacy

Colorlines
2016-06-02

Kenrya Rankin, News Editor

“I cannot separate my gender from my race from my sexual orientation. If in that moment I’m speaking out about gender, then I’m also in some way speaking out about race and about feminism.”

In the latest example of “Amandla Stenberg is so woke,” the teenage actress and activist held an online “Ask Amandla” Q&A session with Rookie magazine’s young readers. In it, the teen—who identifies as non-binary and prefers the pronoun “they”—discussed gender identity, how White beauty standards impact the lives of Black people and the importance of intersectionality in advocacy. Watch the May 31 video and soak in Amandla’s preternaturally mature wisdom.

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Conversations: Victoria Bynum

Posted in History, Interviews, Media Archive, Mississippi, Slavery, United States, Videos on 2016-06-17 14:58Z by Steven

Conversations: Victoria Bynum

Mississippi Public Broadcasting
Aired: 2016-06-16
Length: 00:26:46


Historian and author Victoria Bynum talks about her book, “The Free State of Jones: Mississippi’s Longest War.” First published in 2003, the book tells the story of Jones County residents who opposed secession from the Union during the civil war. The true story is receiving a resurgence in interest now that it has been made into a major motion picture starring Matthew McConaughey.

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Race isn’t biologically real. That doesn’t mean racism doesn’t exist.

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, Social Science, United States, Videos on 2016-06-13 00:10Z by Steven

Race isn’t biologically real. That doesn’t mean racism doesn’t exist.

Vox
2016-06-11

Victoria M. Massie

The first step to fixing a problem is acknowledging it exists. And in the latest episode of MTV’s Decoded, host Franchesca Ramsey breaks down exactly why being colorblind to someone’s race not only doesn’t fix racism but, if anything, she says, actually makes matters worse.

“Have you ever wondered why people say, ‘Oh, I don’t see color’ as a way to fix racism?” Ramsey asks. “Yeah, that doesn’t work.”

Sure, race is not biologically real. But Ramsey points out that resting on that argument alone is part of the problem…

Read the entire article here.

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The Agonies Of “Passing” – Considering the Murder Mystery ‘Sapphire’

Posted in Articles, Communications/Media Studies, Media Archive, Passing, United Kingdom, Videos on 2016-06-12 01:06Z by Steven

The Agonies Of “Passing” – Considering the Murder Mystery ‘Sapphire’

IndieWire
July 2014

Sergio

The Agonies Of “Passing” – Considering the Murder Mystery ‘Sapphire

Starting in the late 1940’s, and continuing through to the end of the ‘50’s, Hollywood seemed to be obsessed with the concept of “passing” –light skinned black people passing for white. Though it wasn’t new, of course, somehow it caught Tinseltown’s attention and a slew of films were made, almost all them dealing with women in particular, who passed for white and the tragedies and sorrow that they encountered.

Elia Kazan’sPinky,” “Lost Boundaries,” “Imitation Of Life,” “Band of Angels,” “The Night of the Quarter Moon,” “I Passed for White,” and the would-be “Gone with the Wind” rip-off, “Raintree County,” with Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift, which, technically may not be a “passing” movie, though it deals with a pre-Civil war, antebellum Southern belle (Taylor), who goes slowly insane because she believes her real mother was a slave, who was her father’s lover (turns out that she wasn’t, but Taylor dies anyway for all her grief).

But, for my money, the real doozy of the passing-for-white films wasn’t from Hollywood, but came instead from the U.K.

I’m referring to the 1959 British mystery detective film “Sapphire,” directed by Basil Dearden, who specialized, during the late 50′s and 60′s, in films with controversial subject matter, such as his 1961 film “Victim,” which dealt with a successful and closeted gay barrister who is being blackmailed, and fights back against his tormentors. It is credited for being the first movie in which the word “homosexual” was actually used in a film.

But “Sapphire” is in another realm altogether…

Read the entire review here. Watch the entire film, Sapphire here.

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Piers Morgan shot down after trying to justify comments about ‘racist’ Muhammad Ali during GMB

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, United Kingdom, Videos on 2016-06-10 16:55Z by Steven

Piers Morgan shot down after trying to justify comments about ‘racist’ Muhammad Ali during GMB

The Daily Mirror
London, England
2016-06-06

The host previously tweeted that Ali was responsible for a number of ‘inflammatory’ and ‘racist’ comments

Piers Morgan was shot down as he discussed Muhammad Ali during Good Morning Britain.

Over the weekend the outspoken host was met with a backlash when he claimed Ali was responsible for a number of ‘racist’ comments following his death on Friday.

He tweeted: “Muhammad Ali said far more inflammatory/racist things about white people than Donald Trump ever has about Muslims. #fact.”

Piers looked to be trying to justify his comments about the boxer when he presented Good Morning Britain on Monday.

Speaking to barrister Miranda Brawn, he said: “There was another side to Ali, he was incredibly controversial.”…

…But guest Miranda didn’t let Piers’ comments go uncontested as she set the record straight about Ali’s racial agenda.

She instead reminded Piers that Ali was integral in helping improve self-pride amongst black people…

Read the entire article here.

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“Slow Jam the News” with President Obama

Posted in Articles, Barack Obama, Media Archive, United States, Videos on 2016-06-10 14:14Z by Steven

“Slow Jam the News” with President Obama

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon
NBC
2016-09-06

Jimmy Fallon and President Obama slow jam the news, discussing Obama’s legacy, accomplishments and thoughts on the 2016 election.

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This web series asks black women around the world to explain what beauty means to them

Posted in Articles, Communications/Media Studies, Europe, Interviews, Media Archive, United States, Videos, Women on 2016-06-04 23:46Z by Steven

This web series asks black women around the world to explain what beauty means to them

Fusion
2016-06-02

Tahirah Hairston


Courtesy of Un-Ruly

They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but that’s not the impression you’d get from flipping through a fashion magazine. The images we see in mainstream media every day suggest that there’s only one way to be beautiful: white skin, blonde hair, blue eyes, thin body. Not only do these ideals exclude women of color altogether, but they also reinforce the troubling idea that you should change your hair, skin color, or body to be a part of the club.

But thanks to social media and the internet, there are new gatekeepers changing the conversation about what it means to be beautiful, practicing inclusive representation, and creating places to explore, talk, and educate. Antonia Opiah is one of them. In 2013, she started launched her hair blog and e-commerce site Un-ruly, which has everything from hair commentary, styling tips and recommendations for products to buy. It was in creating this website that Opiah became comfortable in her own skin and hair…

Read the entire interview here.

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Race, revolution and interracial relations: Revisiting rapper Emicida’s video ‘Boa Esperança’, the most courageous video of 2015

Posted in Articles, Arts, Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, Communications/Media Studies, History, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Slavery, Videos on 2016-05-29 17:09Z by Steven

Race, revolution and interracial relations: Revisiting rapper Emicida’s video ‘Boa Esperança’, the most courageous video of 2015

Black Women of Brazil
2016-04-25

Note from BW of Brazil: Get ready! Today’s piece is one of those long articles in which you must read every word in order to get the full significance. The rapper known as Emicida is perhaps the most popular rapper in Brazil right now and his star continues to rise. Last year, the rapper released the video for his song “Boa Esperança”, one of the most discussed music videos of last year and for good reason and you will no doubt agree.

The video takes on the realities of race and class in modern day Brazilian society that date back all the way to the colonial era; a colonial era in which masses of Brazilian Indians were massacred and millions of imported Africans were forced to endure unthinkable conditions of cruelty, exploitation and death. As we have seen in numerous posts in the past, many black Brazilians still make references to the Casa Grande (big house/slave master’s home) to describe race relations in modern day Brazil, even as the institution of slavery officially ended in 1888, making Brazil the last country in the Western world to abolish this practice…

Read the entire article here.

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Sweden: People didn’t turn on refugees; system maxed out

Posted in Europe, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy, Videos on 2016-05-19 01:16Z by Steven

Sweden: People didn’t turn on refugees; system maxed out

Cable News Network (CNN)
Amanpour
2016-05-08

Christiane Amanpour speaks with Alice Bah Kuhnke, Swedish Minister for Culture and Democracy, about the crushing refugee crisis in Europe.

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