Visualizando la Conciencia Mestiza: The Relation of Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Consciousness to Mexican American Performance and Poster Art

Posted in Dissertations, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Women on 2012-03-22 23:37Z by Steven

Visualizando la Conciencia Mestiza: The Relation of Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Consciousness to Mexican American Performance and Poster Art

University of South Florida
2010
53 pages

Maria Cristina Serrano

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Liberal Arts Department of Humanities and Cultural Studies College of Arts and  Sciences University of South Florida

This thesis explores Gloria Anzaldúa’s notion of mestiza consciousness and its relation to Mexican American performance and poster art. It examines how the traditional conceptions of mestizo identity were redefined by Anzaldúa’s Borderlands/La Frontera in an attempt to eradicate oppression through a change of consciousness. Anzaldua’s conceptions are then applied to Guillermo Gómez-Peña’s performance art discussing the intricacies and complexities of his performances as examples of mestiza consciousness. This thesis finally analyzes various Mexican American posters in relation to both Anzaldúa and Gomez-Peña’s art works. It demonstrates that the similarities in the artist’s treatment of hybridity illustrate a progressive change in worldview, thus exhibit mestiza consciousness.

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures
  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mestiza Consciousness
  • Chapter 2: The Relation of Mestiza Consciousness to Guillermo Gomez-Peña’s Border Brujo and The Couple in a Cage
  • Chapter 3: The Creative Synthesis in Mexican American Poster Art
  • Conclusions
  • References

List of Figures

  • Figure 2.1: Still from Border Brujo
  • Figure 2.2: Gomez-Peña as Border Brujo
  • Figure 2.3: Fusco and Gomez-Peña in Couple in the Cage
  • Figure 2.4: Close-up of performers
  • Figure 3.1: Andrew Sermeno, Huelga! (Strike!)
  • Figure 3.2: Unknown, Tierra o Muerte! Venceremos
  • Figure 3.3: Diego Rivera, The History of Mexico: The Ancient Indian World
  • Figure 3.4: David Alfaro Siqueiros, Cuauhtemoc Against the Myth
  • Figure 3.5: Malaquias Montoya, Vietnam, Aztlán
  • Figure 3.6: Xavier Miramontes, Boycott Grapes (Boicotea las Uvas)
  • Figure 3.7: Rodolfo “Rudy: Cuellar, Bilingual Education Says Twice as Much
  • Figure 3.8: Jose Montoya, Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzalez, and Louie “The Foot” Gonzalez, Jose Montoya’s Pachuco Art: A Historical Update
  • Figure 3.9: Victor Ochoa, Border Bingo
  • Figure 3.10: Laura Molina, Cihualyaomiquiz, The Jaguar
  • Figure 3.11: Tina Hernandez, Ya Basta!
  • Figure 3.12: DC Comics, Wonder Woman
  • Figure 3.13: J. Howard Mitchell, We Can Do It

Read the entire thesis  here.

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Hybrid Veggies & Mixed Kids: Ecocriticism and Race in Ruth Ozeki’s Pastoral Heartlands

Posted in Articles, Asian Diaspora, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Women on 2012-03-22 23:14Z by Steven

Hybrid Veggies & Mixed Kids: Ecocriticism and Race in Ruth Ozeki’s Pastoral Heartlands

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies
Volume 2 (2011)
pages 22-29

Melissa Eriko Poulsen
Literature Department
University of California, Santa Cruz

This paper explores the troping of racial categories and mixed race bodies in Ruth Ozeki’s All Over Creation (2003) and My Year of Meats (1999). Moving through both transnational and local space, Ozeki’s writes an ecocritical pastoral text in order to resist representations of people of mixed race stemming from nineteenth century racial theory. Drawing attention to the consumption of food within and across national borders, whether genetically modified potatoes or hormone-infused beef, Ozeki simultaneously highlights the uncritical consumption of the language of biology around the mixed race body. All Over Creation and My Year of Meats are constructed around the traditions and tensions inherent in the pastoral, using mixed race to counter the silences of ecocritical discourse while problematizing science- and place-based constructions of race.

Read the entire article here.

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Teaching Edith Eaton/Sui Sin Far: Multiple Approaches

Posted in Articles, Asian Diaspora, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Women on 2012-03-22 22:57Z by Steven

Teaching Edith Eaton/Sui Sin Far: Multiple Approaches

Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies
Volume 1 (2010)
pages 70-78

Wei Ming Dariotis, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies
San Francisco State University

This essay compares pedagogical approaches to teaching the literature of Edith Eaton in two distinct contexts: a course on Asian American Literature and a course on Asian Americans of Mixed Heritage.  This is a comparison of the variant pedagogical approaches in these two different contexts.

Read the entire article here.

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Mixed Race Jamaicans in England

Posted in Articles, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Law, Media Archive, United Kingdom on 2012-03-22 01:27Z by Steven

Mixed Race Jamaicans in England

A Parcel of Ribbons: Eighteenth century Jamaica viewed throught family stories and documents
2012-01-28

Ann Powers

The status of  mixed race Jamaicans in eighteenth century Jamaica was always going to be less than than of white colonists, but it was possible for them to become established and successful in England. A case in point are two of the children of Scudamore Winde.

Ambrose Scudamore Winde (he seems to have dropped the Ambrose early on) was born about 1732 at Kentchurch in Herefordshire, son of John Winde and Mary Scudamore.  The beautiful Kentchurch Court is still in the hands of the Scudamore family as it has been for the last thousand years or so. In 1759, following the suicide of his father, he and his brother Robert went to Jamaica where Scudamore Winde became an extremely successful merchant.  He was also Assistant Judge of the Supreme Court of the Judicature and a member of the Assembly.

Like many white colonists of the island he had relationships with several women but did not marry.  When he died in late September 1775 he left generous legacies to his various children. His business had prospered and a large part of his assets were in the form of debts owed to him. According to Trevor Burnard[1] he had  personal assets of £94,273, of which £82,233 were in the form of debts. This would be equivalent to about £9.3 million relative to current retail prices or £135 million in relation to average wages today.

Scudamore Winde freed his negro slave Patty who was baptised as Patty Winde in 1778 at Kingston when her age was given as about 50.  Patty and her daughter Mary were left land that he had bought from Richard Ormonde in Saint Catherine’s with the buildings on it, and £100 Jamaican currency together with two slaves called Suki and little Polly.  It is not clear whether Mary was Scudamore Winde’s daughter for although her name is given as Mary Winde she is referred to as a negro rather than mulatto.

Scudamore Winde had a mulatto son called Robert, possibly the son of Patty, who was born about 1759, and three children with Sarah Cox herself a free negro or mulatto (records vary).  Her children were Penelope, John and Thomas born between 1768 and 1774.  John may have died young and Thomas elected to remain in Jamaica where he had a successful career as a merchant in Kingston.  Robert and Penelope travelled to England under the eye of Robert Cooper Lee who was trustee and executor of his close friend Scudamore Winde’s Will…

Read the entire article here.

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Morgan Goode: On Board with the Future of the Movement

Posted in Articles, Gay & Lesbian, New Media, United States, Women on 2012-03-22 00:32Z by Steven

Morgan Goode: On Board with the Future of the Movement

The Bilerico Project
2012-03-21

Amy Andre, Project Contributor

If you haven’t heard of her already, BiNet USA board member Morgan Goode is a name for you to remember. At this year’s Creating Change conference, she co-led a workshop about mixed race issues that brought a crowd that was literally spilling out of the doors. I was in that room, and I saw the current and future leadership of the bi movement—and of the LGBT movement as a whole—sitting in there with me. Specifically, I saw it at the front of the room.

Morgan is a writer and photographer living in Brooklyn. She is a profo-queer and is affiliated with many different LGBT organizations, but her opinions are her own. She tells me that one day she is going to make good on her threat to do a photo project on white tourists photographing homeless people of color. In the meantime, she is an editor-at-large at prettyqueer.com and is also organizing the 6th Annual Amazingly Queer Race for Economic Justice. Her favorite pastimes include subverting the gaze, making people uncomfortably aware of their privilege and petting kitties.

I recently caught up with Morgan to learn more about where she’s going, where the movement is going, and how we can all get on board. Here’s what she had to say.

Amy: What inspired your workshop at Creating Change for mixed race attendees? How did it go for you? Do you plan to do more in the future?

Morgan: Mixed race issues have been on my mind since I can remember but that workshop actually came out of meeting fellow activist Ryan Li Dahlstrom at the 2010 BECAUSE Conference. The conference and the panel obviously focused on bi/pan/fluid issues, but Ryan Li and I really connected around our shared identities as mixed race queers. It wasn’t long before we knew we had to do a workshop that would give mixed race queer and trans folks the opportunity to come together and support each other as activists and allies. I think mixed race queer and trans folks are really hungry for that space to share our experiences and be heard…

Read the entire article here.

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