2010 Census Shows Interracial and Interethnic Married Couples Grew by 28 Percent over Decade

Posted in Articles, Census/Demographics, New Media, United States on 2012-04-25 23:27Z by Steven

2010 Census Shows Interracial and Interethnic Married Couples Grew by 28 Percent over Decade

United States Census Bureau
Newsroom
2012-04-25

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a 2010 Census brief, Households and Families: 2010, that showed interracial or interethnic opposite-sex married couple households grew by 28 percent over the decade from 7 percent in 2000 to 10 percent in 2010. States with higher percentages of couples of a different race or Hispanic origin in 2010 were primarily located in the western and southwestern parts of the United States, along with Hawaii and Alaska.

A higher percentage of unmarried partners were interracial or interethnic than married couples. Nationally, 10 percent of opposite-sex married couples had partners of a different race or Hispanic origin, compared with 18 percent of opposite-sex unmarried partners and 21 percent of same-sex unmarried partners.

Read the entire press release here.

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Nicole Myoshi Rabin to be Featured Guest on Mixed Chicks Chat

Posted in Audio, Interviews, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United States on 2012-04-25 22:00Z by Steven

Nicole Myoshi Rabin to be Featured Guest on Mixed Chicks Chat

Mixed Chicks Chat (Founders of the Mixed Roots Film & Literary Festival)
Hosted by Fanshen Cox, Heidi W. Durrow and Jennifer Frappier
Website: TalkShoe™ (Keywords: Mixed Chicks)
Episode: Nicole Myoshi Rabin
When: Wednesday, 2012-04-25, 21:00Z (17:00 EDT, 14:00 PDT)

Nicole Myoshi Rabin, Instructor of Liberal Arts & Interdisciplinary Studies
Emerson College, Boston. Massachusetts

Rabin is the author of the articles “True Blood: The Vampire as a Multiracial Critique on Post-Race” in Journal of Dracula Studies (2010) and “Interrogating Identity Construction: Bodies versus Community in Cynthia Kadohata’s In the Heart of the Valley of Love” in Asian American Literature: Discourses & Pedagogies (2010).

Listen to the podcast here. Download the podcast here.

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“Nearly White” and Clinging to “Bits of Finery”: Jim Crow Logic, Brazil, and Evelyn Scott’s Escapade

Posted in Articles, Literary/Artistic Criticism, New Media on 2012-04-25 21:15Z by Steven

“Nearly White” and Clinging to “Bits of Finery”: Jim Crow Logic, Brazil, and Evelyn Scott’s Escapade

Women’s Studies: An inter-disciplinary journal
Volume 41, Issue 4, 2012
Special Issue: Women and Travel
DOI: 10.1080/00497878.2012.663249

Amy Schmidt, Supervisor of Supplemental Instruction
Lyon College, Batesville, Arkansas

Evelyn Scott’s Escapade (1923) illustrates both the similarities and the differences between the U.S. South and South American Brazil, highlighting the former’s privileged position as part of the U.S.  Through depictions of elite southern American women living in Brazil, Scott’s Escapade demonstrates how identity performances are disrupted when the stage for them changes and denaturalizes identity through parody, revealing how performances depend upon material means. However, it also demonstrates how the ideology governing performances remains, unfortunately, quite consistent; while her critiques of American capitalism reveal its international consequences, Scott inadvertently illustrates how Jim Crow logic translates rather easily into other regions and countries. Scott’s text demonstrates an impulse towards social justice but simultaneously reveals ambivalence about relinquishing privilege.

Scott left the South to escape the constraints of Jim Crow logic, which entails more than racial segregation laws; as all identities intersect with one another under a “matrix of domination,” race- cannot be divorced from gender, class, or nationality (see Collins 228). Thus, the gender constraints Scott faced in the U.S. South are just as much a part of Jim Crow logic as racial segregation is. and travel taboos are a notable illustration of how Jim Crow governs both race and gender. When Scott left the South in 1913, elite white women were not allowed to travel without a white male chaperone; despite the energy while southerners spent on…

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The Vigorous Core of Our Nationality: Race and Regional Identity in Northeastern Brazil

Posted in Anthropology, Books, Brazil, Caribbean/Latin America, History, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs on 2012-04-25 01:05Z by Steven

The Vigorous Core of Our Nationality: Race and Regional Identity in Northeastern Brazil

University of Pittsburgh Press
March 2011
328 pages
6 x 9
Paper ISBN: 9780822961338

Stanley E. Blake, Assistant Professor of History
Ohio State University, Lima

The Vigorous Core of Our Nationality explores conceptualizations of regional identity and a distinct population group known as nordestinos in northeastern Brazil during a crucial historical period. Beginning with the abolition of slavery and ending with the demise of the Estado Novo under Getúlio Vargas, Stanley E. Blake offers original perspectives on the paradoxical concept of the nordestino and the importance of these debates to the process of state and nation building. Since colonial times, the Northeast has been an agricultural region based primarily on sugar production. The area’s population was composed of former slaves and free men of African descent, indigenous Indians, European whites, and mulattos. The image of the nordestino was, for many years, linked with the predominant ethnic group in the region, the Afro-Brazilian. For political reasons, however, the conception of the nordestino later changed to more closely resemble white Europeans. Blake delves deeply into local archives and determines that politicians, intellectuals, and other urban professionals formulated identities based on theories of science, biomedicine, race, and social Darwinism. While these ideas served political, social, and economic agendas, they also inspired debates over social justice and led to reforms for both the region and the people. Additionally, Blake shows how debates over northeastern identity and the concept of the nordestino shaped similar arguments about Brazilian national identity and “true” Brazilian people.

Contents

  • Preface
  • 1. Introduction: Nordeste and Nation
  • 2. The Nineteenth-Century Origins of the Nordestino, 1850–1870
  • 3. Racial Science in Pernambuco, 1870–1910
  • 4. The Medicalization of Nordestinos, 1910–1925
  • 5. Social Hygiene: The Science of Reform, 1925–1940
  • 6. Mental Hygiene: The Science of Character, 1925–1940
  • 7. Inventing the Homem de Nordeste: Race, Region, and the State, 1925–1940
  • Notes
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • Index

In 1921, a future Brazilian bureaucrat named Agamemnon Magalhães asserted in a thesis written for an academic appointment that the northeastern region of Brazil was “a distinct ‘habitat,’ characterized by the rigor of its ecological conditions. Nature is reflected in man, imprinting his features, sculpting his form, forming his spirit.” Magalhães wrote about the Northeast and nordestinos, as peoples of the region were called, as if they had long been thought of as a distinct political and geographic region and people. This was most certainly not the case. Just six years before, in 1915, Brazilian geographers had gathered in Recife, the capital of the northeastern state of Pernambuco, for the Fourth Brazilian Congress of Geography. In the official sessions and papers presented there, geographers referred only to the “states of the North,” the “problem of the North,” and the “droughts of the North.” Magalhães also employed climatic, geographic, and racial determinism to describe nordestinos, calling them the product of interaction between rugged terrain, a harsh climate, and European, Indian, and African cultural and racial influences. Furthermore, he considered the peoples of the region to be “the producers of Brazilian nationality.” In other words, for Magalhães, the mixed-race nordestino was the quintessential Brazilian. This notion ran contrary to conventional wisdom. During Brazil’s First Republic (1889–1930), intellectuals and politicians advanced new understandings of Brazilian national identity that idealized European immigration and racial whitening…

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The Social Construction of Race and Monacan Education in Amherst County, Virginia, 1908–1965: Monacan Perspectives

Posted in Articles, History, Media Archive, Native Americans/First Nation, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science, United States, Virginia on 2012-04-25 00:37Z by Steven

The Social Construction of Race and Monacan Education in Amherst County, Virginia, 1908–1965: Monacan Perspectives

History of Education Quarterly
Volume 47, Issue 4 (November 2007)
pages 389–415
DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-5959.2007.00107.x

Melanie D. Haimes-Bartolf
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia

That’s all you heard, everywhere we went, or whatever we done, “oh, he’s one of those issues.” We couldn’t work with white people, we couldn’t be in schools with them, we couldn’t associate with them, we couldn’t eat |with them). I think they came up with the slang word “free issue.” They had this hatred; they just had this ungodly hatred. They couldn’t accept you as a human.

At the prodding of Thomas Jefferson, the Virginia General Assembly in 1782 passed legislation that allowed slave owners to manumit their slaves by issuing slaves a copy of their emancipation papers and making them “free issues.”‘ Nevertheless, in Amherst County, Virginia, the meaning of “free issue” evolved to connote something very different than it did at its inception for a small mountain community.

In 1953, the school board of Amherst County, Virginia, approved plans for new white and black high schools, and the State Board of Education made it possible for Pamunkey and Mattaponi Indian children of Virginia’s tidewater to finish their education beyond the eighth grade at accredited Indian high schools outside Virginia. Notwithstanding, there was a group of children living in the Tobacco Row Mountains at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains for whom educational opportunity beyond the seventh grade would remain largely out of reach for another decade…

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