Marcia Dawkins, Author of “Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing” on Mixed Race Radio

Posted in Audio, Interviews, Live Events, Media Archive, Passing, Social Science, United States on 2012-05-02 22:01Z by Steven

Marcia Dawkins, Author of “Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing” on Mixed Race Radio

Mixed Race Radio
Blogtalkradio
2012-05-02, 16:00Z (12:00 EDT)

Tiffany Rae Reid, Host

Marcia Alesan Dawkins, Visiting Scholar
Brown University

Marcia Dawkins’ book, Clearly Invisible and the Color of Cultural Identity (Baylor University Press, 2012), is the first to connect racial passing and classical rhetoric to issues of disability, gender-neutral parenting, human trafficking, hacktivism, identity theft, racial privacy, media typecasting and violent extremism.

By applying fresh eyes to landmark historical cases and benchmark popular culture moments in the history of passing Dawkins also rethinks the representational character and civic purpose of multiracial identities. In the process she provides powerful insights called “passwords” that help readers tackle the tough questions of who we are and how we can relate to one another and the world.

For more information, click here.

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Constructing Afro-Cuban Womanhood: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Republican-Era Cuba, 1902-1958

Posted in Caribbean/Latin America, Dissertations, History, Media Archive, Women on 2012-05-02 18:24Z by Steven

Constructing Afro-Cuban Womanhood: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Republican-Era Cuba, 1902-1958

University of Texas, Austin
343 pages
August 2011

Takkara Keosha Brunson

Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of The University of Texas at Austin in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

This dissertation explores continuities and transformations in the construction of Afro-Cuban womanhood in Cuba between 1902 and 1958. A dynamic and evolving process, the construction of Afro-Cuban womanhood encompassed the formal and informal practices that multiple individuals—from lawmakers and professionals to intellectuals and activists to workers and their families—established and challenged through public debates and personal interactions in order to negotiate evolving systems of power. The dissertation argues that Afro-Cuban women were integral to the formation of a modern Cuban identity. Studies of pre-revolutionary Cuba dichotomize race and gender in their analyses of citizenship and national identity formation. As such, they devote insufficient attention to the role of Afro-Cuban women in engendering social transformations. The dissertation’s chapters—on patriarchal discourses of racial progress, photographic representations, la mujer negra (the black woman), and feminist, communist, and labor movements—probe how patriarchy and assumptions of black racial inferiority simultaneously informed discourses of citizenship within a society that sought to project itself as a white masculine nation. Additionally, the dissertation examines how Afro-Cuban women’s writings and social activism shaped legal reforms, perceptions of cubanidad (Cuban identity), and Afro-Cuban community formation. The study utilizes a variety of sources: organizational records, letters from women to politicians, photographic representations, periodicals, literature, and labor and education statistics. Engaging the fields of Latin American history, African diaspora studies, gender studies, and visual culture studies, the dissertation maintains that an intersectional analysis of race, gender, and nation is integral to developing a nuanced understanding of the pre-revolutionary era.

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures
  • Introduction: Constructing Afro-Cuban Womanhood: Race, Gender, and Citizenship in Republican-Era Cuba, 1902-1958
  • Historiographical Contributions
  • Mapping the Dissertation
  • A Note on Terminology
  • Chapter 1: Patriarchy and Racial Progress within Afro-Cuban Societies in the Early Republic
    • Patriarchy, Racial Progress, and Social Hierarchy
    • Afro-Cuban Organizations during the Republican Era
      • Gender, Patriarchy, and Respectability
    • Afro-Cuban Social Life during the Early Decades of the Republic
      • Class, Gender, and Society Life in Santa Clara
    • A Shift in Discourse: Morality
      • Women, the Family, and Racial Regeneration
    • Conclusion
  • Chapter 2: Exemplary Women: Afro-Cuban Women’s Articulation of Racial Progress
    • Racial Progress and Republican Womanhood
    • Republican Womanhood and the Work of Racial Improvement
      • Writing Republican Womanhood
    • Women of the Partido Independiente de Color (Independent Colored Party)
      • Patriarchy and Women’s Contributions to the PIC
    • Minerva and the Emergence of Afro-Cuban Feminism
      • Marriage and Divorce
    • Patriarchy and Political Voice Through Letter Writing
      • Writing for Work and Educational Opportunities
    • Conclusion
  • Chapter 3: Visualizing Progress: Afro-Cuban Womanood, Sexual Politics, and Photography
    • Theoretical Framework and Methodology
    • Photography and Racism in Cuba
    • Afro-Cuban Photographic Portraiture and Racial Progress
    • Staging Racial Progress Through Adornment Practices
      • Racial Womanhood and Understandings of Beauty
    • The Legal and Moral Family
    • Modern Womanhood and Photography during the 1920s
      • Amelia González: Afro-Cuban Society and Modern Womanhood
    • Conclusion
  • Chapter 4: La Mujer Negra (The Black Woman): The Transformation of Afro-Cuban Women’s Political and Social Thought during the 1930s
    • Popular Mobilization and the Tranformation of Gender Ideologies
      • The “Triple Discrimination” Confronted by Black Women
      • Political Debates on Race, Gender, and Citizenship
    • Black Women and National Politics
      • Afro-Cuban Feminism in the 1930s
    • Afro-Cuban Feminists and the Third National Women’s Congress of 1939
      • Black Womanhood and the Third National Women’s Congress
    • Conclusion
  • Chapter 5: Enacting Citizenship: Afro-Cuban Womanhood in a New Constitutional Era
    • Political Alliances and Democratic Discourses
    • Afro-Cuban Women Communists in the New Constitutional Era
    • Labor and Citizenship
    • Afro-Cuban Women Communists and Popular Protests
      • Economic Reform and Anti-War Protests
      • Connecting Local Issues to Global Struggles after WWII
      • The Democratic Cuban Women’s Federation
    • Nuevos Rumbos (New Directions) and the Struggle for Citizenship
      • Women’s Political Representation and Civil Rights within Afro-Cuban Publications
    • Anti-Racial Discrimination Campaign
      • Racial Discrimination and the Law
    • Conclusion
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography

List of Figures

  • Figure 1: “Úrsula Coimbra Valverde,” Minerva (15 December 1888)
  • Figure 2: “Úrsula Coimbra Valverde,” El Nuevo Criollo (17 December 1904)
  • Figure 3: “Consuelo Serra y Heredia,” El Nuevo Criollo (18 June 1905)
  • Figure 4: “Consuelo Serra y Heredia,” El Nuevo Criollo (18 June 1905)
  • Figure 5: “Esperanza Díaz,” Minerva (September 1910)
  • Figure 6: “Inéz Billini,” Minerva (30 September 1910)
  • Figure 7: “Juana M. Mercado,” Minerva (15 December 1912)
  • Figure 8: Advertisement for Pomada “Mora,” Minerva (15 December 1914)
  • Figure 9: Portrait of Martín Morúa Delgado and his daughters, Arabella and Vestalina. Published in Rafael Serra’s Para blancos y negros: ensayos políticos, sociales y económicos
  • Figure 10: Portrait of Martín Morúa Delgado, his wife, Elvira Granados de Morúa, and their daughters, Vestalina and Arabella. Published in El Fígaro (12 September 1910)
  • Figure 11: “Amelia González,” El Mundo (1 December 1922)
  • Figure 12: “Dámas de Atenas,” Revista Atenas (1931)
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How Scuffletown Became Indian Country: Political Change and Transformations in Indian identity in Robeson County, North Carolina, 1865-1956

Posted in Anthropology, Dissertations, History, Media Archive, Native Americans/First Nation, Politics/Public Policy, Social Science, United States on 2012-05-02 04:30Z by Steven

How Scuffletown Became Indian Country: Political Change and Transformations in Indian identity in Robeson County, North Carolina, 1865-1956

University of Washington
2008
267 pages
Publication Number: AAT 3328369
ISBN: 9780549817246

Anna Bailey

A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy

According to census reports, there were no Indians in Robeson County, North Carolina in the decades leading up to the Civil War. But as the war ended and Reconstruction began, a community, known today as the Lumbee Indians, moved from the category of mulatto into the category of Indian. My dissertation charts the emergence and evolution of Lumbee Indian identity. I argue that Lumbee identity was continually transformed in the midst of political struggles from the end of the Civil War through the post-World War II era. From the end of the Civil War to the 1930s, Lumbee identity was forged in the regional crucible of Reconstruction and Jim Crow politics and articulated through the local institutions of Indian-only churches and schools in Robeson County. Beginning in the 1930s and through the post-World War II era, national developments molded expressions of Lumbee Indian identity. The Great Depression, the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, and the onset of World War II shifted the markers of Lumbee identity from churches, schools, and kinship networks to nationally recognized indices of Indianness such as measurements of Indian blood quantum, line of tribal descent, and recognizably Indian cultural traditions. By highlighting the change in Lumbee identity from a regional entity to a nationally inflected construct, this dissertation illuminates the interconnection between the contours of Lumbee identity and the shifting political landscape in Robeson County from the end of the Civil War through the World War II era.

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Introduction
  • Chapter One: How an Outlaw became an Indian: Henry Berry Lowry and the Conservative Press, 1865-1872
  • Chapter Two: Separating Out: The Emergence of Croatan Indian Identity, 1872-1900
  • Chapter Three: “It is the center to which we should cling”: The Indian School System in Robeson County during Jim Crow, 1900-1930
  • Chapter Four: National Events in Robeson County: The Great Depression, Indian Reorganization Act and Anthropometry, 1930-1940
  • Chapter Five: “You’re the Lumbee Problem”: Social Scientist and Cultural Expressions of Indian Identity in the 1940s and Beyond
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography

Purchase the dissertation here.

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Cultural Reconstruction: Nation, Race, and the Invention of the American Magazine, 1830-1915

Posted in Communications/Media Studies, Dissertations, History, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, United States on 2012-05-02 02:54Z by Steven

Cultural Reconstruction: Nation, Race, and the Invention of the American Magazine, 1830-1915

University of Maryland
2003-12-19
504 pages

Reynolds J. Scott-Childress, Assistant Professor of History
New Paltz, State University of New York

Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Maryland in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Cultural Reconstruction asks: How did the U.S. develop a national culture simultaneously unified and fractured by race? The little-examined history of American magazines offers a vital clue. The dissertation’s first part demonstrates how post-Jacksonian American culturists, deeply disturbed by the divisive partisanship of “male” politics, turned to the “female” culture of sentimentality with the hope of creating a coherent and inclusive nation. These culturists believed a nationally circulating magazine would be the medium of that culture. This belief derived from the wide success of the penny press revolution of the 1830s. Cutting against the traditional reading of the penny press, Cultural Reconstruction claims that newspapers were a major proponent of sentimentality but were barred from creating a national audience by their intense local appeal. Antebellum magazinists, from Edgar Allen Poe to James Russell Lowell, attempted to adapt the sentimental worldview of the penny press to a national audience, but were frustrated by a series of cultural rifts expressed chiefly in gendered terms. Part two of the dissertation examines how the post-Civil War magazine furthered the project of sentimentality and became the leading medium of national culture. Responding to the 1870s collapse of Political Reconstruction, editors such as Richard Watson Gilder at the Century employed a series of innovative aesthetic strategiesgreater realism, local color, and regional dialect believing they were creating a cultural panorama of American life. But this project of reconstruction was riven by two fundamentally conflicting visions of American identity: the regional versus the racial. The dissertation explores correspondence between Northern magazinists and white and black Southern authors (George Washington Cable, Charles Chesnutt, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and Thomas Nelson Page) to reveal how race won out: Northern editors helped invent and popularize “Southern” memories of the Old South and the Civil War. In the process, the magazines nationalized white Southern conceptions of racial separation and prepared the way for the explosive nationwide reaction to the 1915 film The Birth of a Nation. Cultural Reconstruction shows how twentieth-century American national unity was paradoxically bound up in racial division.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction. Forgetting the Magazine: The Birth of a National Culture
  • Part I The Rise of Sentimental Public Culture
    • 1. The Fall of the Millennial Nation: The Failure of the Atlantic Cable and the Coming of the Civil War
    • 2. Printing Urban Society: The Social Imagination and the Rise of the Daily Newspaper
    • 3. The Whole Tendency of the Age Is Magazineward: The Post-Jacksonian Magazine and National Culture
  • Part II Cultural Reconstruction: The American Magazine
    • 4. Competing for Culture: The Rise of the General Magazine
    • 5. The Evolution of Magazine Culture: Sentimentality, Class, and the Editors of Scribner’s:
    • 6. The Genre of Sentimental Realism: The Thematics, Stylistics, and Form of the Postbellum Magazine
    • 7. Cultural Reconstruction: National Unity and Racial Division in the American Magazine
    • 8. From Local Color to Racial Color: The Century and African American Authors
    • 9. A Hazard of New Cultures
  • Bibliography

Read the entire dissertation here.

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BLACK, TRIGUEÑO, WHITE…? Shifting Racial Identification among Puerto Ricans

Posted in Articles, Caribbean/Latin America, Census/Demographics, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2012-05-02 02:17Z by Steven

BLACK, TRIGUEÑO, WHITE…? Shifting Racial Identification among Puerto Ricans

Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
Volume 2, Issue 2 (2005)
pages 267-285
DOI: 10.1017/S1742058X05050186

Carlos Vargas-Ramos, Research Associate
Center for Puerto Rican Studies
Hunter College, City University of New York

The use of U.S.-oriented racial categories in the 2000 decennial census conducted by the Census Bureau in Puerto Rico provided results that may not accurately reflect social dynamics in Puerto Rico, more generally, and inequality based on race, in particular. This work explores how variations in racial typologies used for the collection of data in Puerto Rico and the methodology used to collect such data produce widely ranging results on racial identification that in turn affect the measurement of the impact of “race” on social outcomes. Specifically, the analysis focuses on how the omission of locally based and meaningful racial terminology from census questionnaires leads to results on racial identification that differ markedly from those found in survey data that include such terminology. In addition, differing strategies to record the racial identification of Puerto Ricans on the island (i.e., self-identification versus identification by others), lead to variations that highlight the changing effect of race on socioeconomic status. Who identifies a person’s race affects analyses of how race affects the life chances of individuals in Puerto Rico.

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Brian Bantum to be Featured Guest on Mixed Chicks Chat

Posted in Audio, Interviews, Live Events, Media Archive, Religion, United States on 2012-05-02 00:17Z by Steven

Brian Bantum to be Featured Guest on Mixed Chicks Chat

Mixed Chicks Chat (Founders of the Mixed Roots Film & Literary Festival)
Hosted by Fanshen Cox, Heidi W. Durrow and Jennifer Frappier
Website: TalkShoe™ (Keywords: Mixed Chicks)
Episode 254: Brian Bantum
When: Wednesday, 2012-05-02, 21:00Z (17:00 EDT, 14:00 PDT)

Brian Bantum, Assistant Professor of Theology
Seattle Pacific University


Brian Bantum is Assistant Professor of Theology at Seattle Pacific University and author of Redeeming Mulatto: A Theology of Race and Christian Hybridity.

Redeeming Mulatto: Race, Culture, and Ethnic Plurality from Quest Church on Vimeo.

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