Participatory diagramming in social work research: Utilizing visual timelines to interpret the complexities of the lived multiracial experience

Posted in Articles, Media Archive, Social Work, United States on 2013-07-18 02:31Z by Steven

Participatory diagramming in social work research: Utilizing visual timelines to interpret the complexities of the lived multiracial experience

Qualitative Social Work
Volume 12, Number 4 (July 2013)
pages 414-432
DOI: 10.1177/1473325011435258

Kelly F. Jackson, Assistant Professor of Social Work
Arizona State University

The purpose of this article is to present an illustrative example of the analytic potential of image-based research in social work. Insight gained from a qualitative research study that used a novel form of participatory diagramming to examine the racial identity development of ten multiracial individuals is referenced and critiqued. Utilizing a critical visual methodological framework to analyze visual timelines, this article offers insight into the contextually rich and dynamic processes comprising the multiracial experience. This article concludes with an informative discussion of how visual methods support key social work values, including commitment to clients and understanding the person-in-environment, and how participatory diagramming in particular can enhance culturally sensitive and responsible research and practice with multiracial individuals.

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Living the Multiracial Experience: Shifting Racial Expressions, Resisting Race, and Seeking Community

Posted in Articles, New Media, Social Work, United States on 2011-12-29 15:17Z by Steven

Living the Multiracial Experience: Shifting Racial Expressions, Resisting Race, and Seeking Community

Qualitative Social Work
Volume 11, Number 1 (January 2012)
pages 42-60
DOI: 10.1177/1473325010375646

Kelly Faye Jackson, Assistant Professor of Social Work
Arizona State University

The growing presence and visibility of mixed race persons in the US demands that social workers critically examine and understand the complexity of multiracial identity. This qualitative investigation examined the narratives of ten multiracial adults about their identity experiences living as multiracial persons. Utilizing paradigmatic analysis of narratives, five major themes emerged. Four of these themes correspond to categories found in existing multiracial scholarship, and include: (1) Shifting racial/ethnic expressions; (2) Racial/ethnic ambiguity; (3) Feeling like an outsider; and (4) Seeking community. The final theme, (5) Racial resistance, contributes new knowledge to our understanding of how multiracial individuals respond to societal pressures to conform to traditional means of categorizing others by race. Findings from this study confirm a collective multiracial experience; one with direct ties to the social and environmental pressures associated with having a multifaceted identity in a color-conscious society. Practice implications and directions for future research are offered.

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The Best of Both Worlds? Family Influences on Mixed Race Youth Identity Development

Posted in Articles, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive on 2009-08-19 20:05Z by Steven

The Best of Both Worlds? Family Influences on Mixed Race Youth Identity Development

Qualitative Social Work
Volume 7, Number 1 (March 2008)
pages 81-98
DOI: 10.1177/1473325007086417

Susan E. Crawford
Halton Multicultural Council, Canada

Ramona Alaggia
University of Toronto, Canada

This study explored influences on racial identity of mixed race youth who identified themselves to be part of mixed African (Black) and European (White) origin. Research questions emerged following a review of the literature identifying the ways in which views of self, family, peers and society impact youth and their racial identification. Eight in-depth interviews employing the Long Interview Method were conducted, transcribed and coded to determine themes. Family influences emerged as playing a significant role in biracial identity formation. Three major themes were identified: (1) level of parental awareness and understanding of race issues; (2) impact of family structure; and (3) communication and willingness to talk about race issues. Implications for researchers and social work practitioners working with this population are discussed.

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