Mapping Interracial/Interethnic Married-Couple Households in the United States: 2010

Posted in Census/Demographics, Media Archive, Papers/Presentations, Reports, United States on 2014-03-04 21:53Z by Steven

Mapping Interracial/Interethnic Married-Couple Households in the United States: 2010

United States Census Bureau
Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America
New Orleans, Louisiana
2013-04-11 through 2013-04-13

Tallese D. Johnson, Population Division
U.S. Census Bureau

Rose M. Kreider, Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division
U.S. Census Bureau

Introduction

This poster examines the geographic distribution of interracial and interethnic married couples in the United States. The analysis focuses on county level distributions that map the prevalence of specific combinations of interracial/interethnic married couples, such as Whites married to Asians. The county maps illustrate the diversity of interracial/interethnic couple combinations around the country. Much of the literature on interracial or interethnic married couples shows all such couples together. However, particular intermarried combinations have distinct histories and distributions across the United States.

Given distinct paths of entry into the United States, internal migration patterns, and residential segregation, we would expect that White/Black couples may tend to live in different areas than White/Asian couples, for example. Couples with a relatively longer history of intermarriage, such as Hispanic/non-Hispanic couples or White/American Indian and Alaska Native couples may have distinct patterns of residence. This poster provides basic information about where particular intermarried couples live, by county, across the United States…

View the poster and maps here.

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Results from the 2010 Census Race and Hispanic Origin Alternative Questionnaire Experiment

Posted in Census/Demographics, Latino Studies, Media Archive, Reports, United States on 2013-04-19 23:01Z by Steven

Results from the 2010 Census Race and Hispanic Origin Alternative Questionnaire Experiment

U.S. Census Bureau
Technical Briefing
2012-08-08
62 pages

What is the AQE?

The 2010 Census Race and Hispanic Origin Alternative Questionnaire Experiment (AQE) focused on improving the race and Hispanic origin questions by testing a number of different questionnaire design strategies…

Overview of Technical Briefing

  • (AQE) Goals and Research Strategies
  • Methodology
  • Race and Hispanic Origin Questionnaires
  • Reinterview Study
  • Focus Groups
  • Major Findings
  • Recommendations

Goals and Research Strategies

  • Increase reporting in the standard Office of Management and Budget (OMB) race and ethnic categories
  • Lower item nonresponse to the race and Hispanic origin questions
  • Improve the accuracy and reliability of race and ethnic data
  • Elicit the reporting of detailed race and ethnic groups

…Detailed Approach

  • Includes examples and write-ins for all OMB race and Hispanic origin categories
  • Maintains all original race and Hispanic origin checkboxes

…Streamlined Approach

  • Includes examples and write-ins for all OMB race and Hispanic origin categories
  • Removes specific national origin checkboxes; presented as example groups
  • Streamlined presentation of OMB race and Hispanic origin categories…


…Very Streamlined Approach

  • Part 1 – Very streamlined presentation of OMB race and Hispanic origin categories
  • Part 2 – Examples for all OMB race and Hispanic origin categories
  • Write-in areas for specific race(s), origin(s), or tribe(s)

Read the entire report here.

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2010 Census Shows Interracial and Interethnic Married Couples Grew by 28 Percent over Decade

Posted in Articles, Census/Demographics, New Media, United States on 2012-04-25 23:27Z by Steven

2010 Census Shows Interracial and Interethnic Married Couples Grew by 28 Percent over Decade

United States Census Bureau
Newsroom
2012-04-25

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a 2010 Census brief, Households and Families: 2010, that showed interracial or interethnic opposite-sex married couple households grew by 28 percent over the decade from 7 percent in 2000 to 10 percent in 2010. States with higher percentages of couples of a different race or Hispanic origin in 2010 were primarily located in the western and southwestern parts of the United States, along with Hawaii and Alaska.

A higher percentage of unmarried partners were interracial or interethnic than married couples. Nationally, 10 percent of opposite-sex married couples had partners of a different race or Hispanic origin, compared with 18 percent of opposite-sex unmarried partners and 21 percent of same-sex unmarried partners.

Read the entire press release here.

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Racial Categorization in the 2010 Census

Posted in Census/Demographics, Media Archive, Politics/Public Policy, Reports, United States on 2010-03-19 21:50Z by Steven

Racial Categorization in the 2010 Census

U.S. Commision on Civil Rights
Briefing Report
March 2009
59 pages

A Briefing Before The United States Commission on Civil Rights Held in Washington, DC on 2006-04-07.

On April 7, 2006, a panel of experts briefed members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights on racial categorization in the 2010 Census. Charles Louis Kincannon, Director, U.S. Census Bureau; Sharon M. Lee, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Sociology, Portland State University; Kenneth Prewitt, Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs, Columbia University; and Ward Connerly, Chairman, American Civil Rights Institute, made presentations and offered their expertise on 1) the current racial categories in the 2010 Census; 2) proposed alternative racial categories in the 2010 Census; 3) the proposed elimination of racial categories in the 2010 Census; and 4) the legal and policy implications of Office of Management and Budget guidance to federal agencies on allocation of multiple responses. The briefing was held in Room 226 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

A transcript of this briefing is available on the Commission’s Web site (www.usccr.gov), and by request from the Publications Office, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 624 Ninth Street, NW, Room 600, Washington, DC, 20425; (202) 376-8128; publications@usccr.gov.

Read the entire report here.

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