Are you in an Asian and White American interracial marriage?

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Media Archive, Social Science, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2014-03-13 23:15Z by Steven

Are you in an Asian and White American interracial marriage?

University of California, Berkeley
Center for Race and Gender; Department of Gender and Women’s Study; Department of Sociology
2014-03-13

Louise Ly

Does race and ethnic difference matter in your life?

Hi, my name is Louise Ly. I’m a Ph.D. candidate from the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. I’m interested in learning about whether or not racial and ethnic difference matter in the lives of intermarried Chinese- and Indian-Americans and White Americans.

Background

Some scholars of immigration argue that intermarriage signals a lessening of ethnic difference among intermarried partners and groups who then come to be seen as more similar and equal. Does this thesis reflect your experience? Is your experience different?

Interview Details

  • Interviews involve questions about marriage, family, ethnic/racial experiences
  • Take about 1½ to 2 hours
  • Completely confidential, and will take place at a time and place of your choice

Please contact me at louisely@berkeley.edu or (510) 542-9628, if you would like to schedule time an interview or have any questions.

This study is sponsored by UC Berkeley’s Center for Race and Gender, Department of Gender and Women’s Study, and Sociology Department. It is approved by UC Berkeley’s Committee for Protection of Human Subjects.

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History 101.020: Betwixt and Between in the United States: Boundaries and the People who Defy Them

Posted in Anthropology, Course Offerings, History, Media Archive, Native Americans/First Nation on 2013-03-13 03:09Z by Steven

History 101.020: Betwixt and Between in the United States: Boundaries and the People who Defy Them

University of California, Berkeley
Spring 2013

MacKenzie Moore, Visiting Lecturer

This 101 seminar is geared toward any student who wants to study the boundaries among and between people, nations, or states, broadly defined. It is also perfect for those wishing to explore what happens when such barriers are (inevitably) ruptured, questioned, or otherwise revealed to be unstable. Some, but by no means all, possible topics include: immigrant history, Native American/colonial contact, the history of American sexuality, frontier environments, mixed-race communities or individuals, the US/Mexico Borderlands, religious synthesis, or urban communities.  We will begin the semester by exploring theoretical approaches to the question of boundaries and categories and the power that sustains them. We will also discuss what such categories mean to people as they construct communities, nations, and identities. We will then consider specific examples of people who, out of choice or circumstance, defy those boundaries. The rest of the semester will be run as a writing and reading seminar. We will support and encourage each other through peer editing, research partners, and other boundary-crossing activities.

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English R1A: Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

Posted in Course Offerings, Health/Medicine/Genetics, Literary/Artistic Criticism, Media Archive, Passing on 2012-05-20 03:54Z by Steven

English R1A: Keeping it Real?: Racial & Queer Passing in American Literature

University of California, Berkeley
Fall 2010

Rosa Marti­nez

“I had a literature rather than a personality, a set of fictions about myself.”
Kafka Was the Rage by Anatole Broyard

This course intends to explore the “art” of racial passing and masquerade in American literature and culture through a diverse sample of American novels and short stories, such as traditional narratives of black-to-white passing, which is historically prevalent particularly in African-American literature, and other modes of passing, for instance gender and ethnic ambiguity as well as posing and the “closeting” of one’s sexuality. What are the connections or disjunctions between “closeting,” posing, and crossing the gender or color line? By focusing on the trope of the passing figure, we will ask how people and imagined characters negotiate their identity in various and varying social spaces and also, how authors disclose the frailty of social order regarding sexuality, race and the body to make alliances in unimagined ways. Venturing out of the closet as another and as they please, these passing figures are, indeed, queer. Yet what are the personal costs in relinquishing a disfavored identity for a favored one?

This course intends to hone your reading and writing skills, and will focus on helping you make thoughtful questioning and “interesting use of the texts you read in the essays you write.” Through a gradual process of outlining, rewriting and revising, you will produce 32 pages of written work (including brief response papers and three 3-4 page argumentative essays).

Book List

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios (1542); William and Ellen Craft, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860); Joseph Harris, Rewriting (2006); Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson (1894); a course reader containing critical readings.

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Crossing Lines: Praxis in Mixed Race/Space Studies

Posted in Forthcoming Media, Live Events, United States on 2012-03-12 01:09Z by Steven

Crossing Lines: Praxis in Mixed Race/Space Studies

University of California, Berkeley
Friday, 2012-03-16 through Saturday, 2012-03-17

Co-Sponsored by the UC Berkeley Center for Race and Gender and Ethnic Studies Department.

In traditional Ethnic Studies, mixed race scholarship has often been marginalized, misappropriated, tokenized or simply left out. In order to allow for a collaborative environment given the need for more critical scholarship on the experiences of mixed race people, in Fall 2009, a group of graduate students at UC Berkeley formed the inter-disciplinary working group at the Center for Race & Gender, Transnational Mixed Asians In-Between Spaces (TMABS). The goal of the working group is to to create a safe space for scholars to discuss issues of mixed race identity and also to provide a venue for those doing work in this area to present developing ideas and projects. Furthermore, the working group seeks to expand the notion of mixed race to include other factors such as culture and space. Overall, it is our intent to encourage and promote research on mixed race/culture in Ethnic Studies and bring together scholarship from multiple disciplines to collaborate on future research areas.

In Spring 2012, we will host our inaugural conference entitled, “Crossing Lines: Praxis in Mixed Race/Space Studies.” The conference will take place March 16-17th at the UC Berkeley campus and will include panels, film screenings, poetry performances and an art exhibit.

The co-founders of TMABS are: Kevin Escudero, Joina Hsiao, Ariko Ikehara and Julie Thi Underhill, doctoral students in the Ethnic Studies Department at UC Berkeley.

For more information, click here.

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Amalgamations, New and Old: The Stratification of America’s Mixed Black/White Population

Posted in Dissertations, Media Archive, Social Science, United States on 2011-12-03 22:48Z by Steven

Amalgamations, New and Old: The Stratification of America’s Mixed Black/White Population

University of California, Berkeley
2004
184 pages

Aaron Olaf Gullickson, Assistant Professor of Sociology
University of Oregon

A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology and Demography

This research focuses explicitly on the life chances of biracial black/whites. I contrast the “new” biracials, those born to interracial couples in the post Civil Rights era, to the “old” biracials, the lighter-skinned descendants of the original mulatto elite. Both groups have occupied privileged positions relative to monoracial blacks within educational and occupational institutions. For the old biracials, this privilege derives both from the inherited advantages of the mulatto elite and from the independent signi cance of skin tone within the black community.

I show that the skin tone privileges of lighter-skinned blacks declined for cohorts coming of age during and after the Civil Rights era. This decline marked the end of a system of stratification that characterized the black population for over a century. Furthermore, it seems to suggest that the new biracial advantage over monoracial blacks in educational outcomes is not the result of a skin tone hierarchy within the black population.

These new biracials differ from the old in that they have access to intimate white relatives within their family networks. On the one hand, the new biracial advantage could potentially result from race-based resources, such as access to the cultural and physical resources of their white parent. On the other hand, the new biracial advantage may result from class-based resources, primarily the selection of highly-educated parents into interracial unions.

I show that the new biracial advantage over monoracial blacks in educational outcomes can be largely explained by their relatively privileged family backgrounds. These advantages, and not biraciality itself, result in higher grades and lower grade retention, although they do not explain differences in standardized test scores. Thus, in order to understand the new biracial advantage, we must understand the dynamics of union formation in the immediately prior generation.

I show that this this pattern of interracial union formation can be most accurately described as one of lower-class black isolation. While traditional models of interracial union formation are all plausibly supported by the data, the most accurate model focuses on the exclusion of blacks with a high school degree or less from interracial unions, regardless of their potential partner’s education. This results holds in both marital and non-marital unions and points to the possibility of greater isolation for lower class blacks as interracial unions increase and to a generational bifurcation of the black class structure directly tied to issues of racial identity.

Contents

  • List of Figures
  • List of Table
  • 1 Understanding Race in America, Understanding Race Mixing in America
    • 1.1 The Race Concep
    • 1.2 New and Old
    • 1.3 The Life Chances of Mixed Race Individuals
      • 1.3.1 The mulatto vanguard or the black elite?
      • 1.3.2 Eve and the new biracials
    • 1.4 Outline of this study
  • 2 The Demise of the Mulatto Legacy
    • 2.1 The Skin Tone Legacy
    • 2.2 Colorism
    • 2.3 The Rise and Fall of the Skin Tone Hierarchy
      • 2.3.1 Trends across cohorts
      • 2.3.2 Formal multivariate models
    • 2.4 The Unremarked Demise
  • 3 The New Biracials
    • 3.1 The K-12 Racial Hierarchy
      • 3.1.1 The Biracial Advantage
      • 3.1.2 Understanding the Racial Hierarchy
    • 3.2 Understanding the Biracial Advantage over Blacks
      • 3.2.1 Data
      • 3.2.2 Measures
      • 3.2.3 Models
      • 3.2.4 Analysis
    • 3.3 The Uncertain Position
  • 4 Back a Generation
    • 4.1 The Selectivity of Interracial Unions
      • 4.1.1 Theories of Interracial Marriage
      • 4.1.2 Interracial Unions outside of Marriage
    • 4.2 Models
    • 4.3 Data
    • 4.4 Understanding Black Selectivity
      • 4.4.1 Interracial Marriage
      • 4.4.2 Interracial Cohabitation
    • 4.5 The Unnoticed Isolation
  • 5 Tommorrow
    • 5.1 The Story So Far
    • 5.2 Possibilities
    • 5.3 Directions
    • 5.4 A Final Note
  • A Supplemental Tables
  • B Genealogical Data
  • C Sensitivity Analysis
  • Bibliography

List of Figures

  • 1.1 Stylistic depiction of interracial sexual contact across United States history
  • 1.2 Race and skin tone strati cation
  • 2.1 Skin tone differences relative to light-skinned blacks in years of education across birth cohorts, National Survey of Black Americans
  • 2.2 Skin tone differences in occupational attainment (Duncan SEI) relative to light-skinned blacks across birth cohorts, National Survey of Black Americans
  • 2.3 Skin tone differences relative to light-skinned blacks in spousal years of education across marital cohorts, National Survey of Black Americans
  • 2.4 BIC’ statistic for educational attainment threshold models based on year of threshold
  • 2.5 Predicted effect of skin tone on educational attainment (highest grade completed) across birth cohorts, based on fourth-degree polynomial models
  • 2.6 BIC’ statistic for occupational attainment threshold models based on year of threshold
  • 2.7 Predicted effect of skin tone on occupational attainment (Duncan SEI scores) across birth cohorts, based on fourth-degree polynomial models
  • 2.8 BIC’ statistic for spousal attainment threshold models based on year of threshold
  • 2.9 Predicted effect of skin tone on spousal years of education across marriage cohorts, based on fourth-degree polynomial models
  • 3.1 Logit effect of race on probability of having ever been held back across nested models, Panel Study of Income Dynamics 1995
  • 3.2 Logit effect of race on probability of having ever been held back across nested models, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
  • 3.3 Effect of race on grades in 8th grade across nested models, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
  • 3.4 Effect of race on CAT-ASVAB scores across nested models, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
  • 4.1 Spousal educational distributions by race, race of spouse, and sex, Census 1990
  • 4.2 Stylized depiction of racial intermarriage patterns
  • 4.3 Parameterizations for models of interracial educational partnering
  • 4.4 Parameters from models of interracial educational partnering for married and cohabiting unions
  • 5.1 Possible scenarios for the future, based on two dimensions of change
  • B.1 Strength of interracial sexual contact in Herskovits sample, based on different assumptions
  • C.1 Comparison of parameters from log-linear models with different age groups
  • C.2 Comparison of parameters from log-linear models with marriages of various durations

List of Tables

  • 2.1 Sample size and years for waves of the National Survey of Black Americans and the General Social Survey, 1982
  • 2.2 Fit of threshold models and year of best- tting threshold compared to models without cohort change
  • 2.3 Threshold models predicting educational attainment (total number of grades completed)
  • 2.4 Polynomial models predicting occupational prestige (Duncan SEI Score)
  • 3.1 Cross-classi cation of biological parents’ race in two surveys
  • 3.2 Outcome measures by race
  • 3.3 Variables by race, National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997
  • 3.4 Variables by race, Panel Study of Income Dynamics
  • 3.5 The relative position of biracials
  • 3.6 Structure of the nested models
  • 3.7 Race effects, gross and net
  • 4.1 Union type distribution of new parents by race of parents
  • 4.2 Proportion of black partners in each union type who have more than a high school education by sex and race of partner
  • 4.3 Sample size of data sets
  • 4.4 Fit of different interracial union formation models to marriages from the 1980, 1990 and 2000 U.S. Censuses
  • 4.5 Important parameters from log-linear models, 1980
  • 4.6 Important parameters from log-linear models, 1990
  • 4.7 Important parameters from log-linear models, 2000
  • 4.8 Comparison of isolation model to an alternative educational propensity model
  • 4.9 Comparison between gender symmetry and BM/WF only models
  • 4.10 Fit of models comparing interracial union formation between marital and cohabiting unions
  • A.1 Polynomial models predicting educational attainment (years of schooling)
  • A.2 Polynomial models predicting spouse’s years of schooling
  • A.3 Models predicting whether respondent has ever been held back, Panel Study of Income Dynamics
  • A.4 Models predicting whether the respondent has ever been held back, NLSY97
  • A.5 Models predicting grades in 8th grade, NLSY97
  • A.6 Models predicting CAT-ASVAB test scores, NLSY97
  • A.7 Proportion of black partners in each union type who have a college degree by sex and race of partner
  • A.8 Proportion of black partners in each union type who have more a high school diploma by sex and race of partner
  • B.1 Possible Genealogies in the Herskovits Sample

Read the entire dissertation here.

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Hapa Japan Conference

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2011-03-06 04:41Z by Steven

Hapa Japan Conference

Center for Japanese Studies
Institute of East Asian Studies
University of California, Berkeley
2011-04-08 through 2011-04-09

Introduction

Hapa is a Hawaiian term that is now widely used to describe someone of mixed racial or ethnic heritage. A New York Times article cites that just within the United States, one in seven marriages are now between people from different racial/ethnic backgrounds.

The Center for Japanese Studies, along with the Hapa Japan Database Project and All Nippon Airways, will host the Hapa Japan Conference on April 8th and 9th, featuring specialists in the study of mixed-race Japanese history, identity, and representation. Topics range from the history of mixed-race Japanese in the 1500s, part-Japanese communities in Australia, to the exploration of identity and representation through story-telling, films, and a photo-exhibit. For more information, please reference the conference agenda or contact cjs-events@berkeley.edu.

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Enka Superstar Jero: A Conversation and Mini-Concert

Posted in Arts, Asian Diaspora, Live Events, Media Archive, United States on 2011-03-06 04:07Z by Steven

Enka Superstar Jero: A Conversation and Mini-Concert

University of California, Berkeley
Wheeler Hall
2011-04-08, 20:00-21:15 PDT (Local Time)

Free and open to the public

The Center for Japanese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, is proud to announce that Jero, the Japanese-African-American enka singer, has been selected as the winner of the 2nd annual Berkeley Japan New Vision Award. The Center will host an invitation-only award ceremony at 5:00pm on Friday, April 8, at the Doe Library Morrison Room on the UC Berkeley campus followed by a public on-stage interview and mini-concert at 8:00pm in Wheeler Hall.

Part Japanese and part African American, Jero (born Jerome Charles White) is enka’s rising star ever since his hit single Umiyuki burst onto the charts in 2008. His albums, Yakusoku (2009), Covers (2008), Covers 2 (2009), and Covers 3 (2010) have been widely acclaimed as he has revived interest in this music genre. Winner of the 2008 Best New Artist Award at the Japan Record Awards and the 2011 Berkeley Japan New Vision Award, he has also regularly appeared on Japanese TV and commercials as well as performing at the prestigious New Year’s Eve Kôhaku Utagassen concert twice.

The Berkeley Japan New Vision Award was established in 2009 to award an individual who has, in recent times, dramatically transformed our vision of Japan. Singing traditional Japanese ballads in an American idiom, not only has Jero rekindled an interest in enka among the younger generation of Japanese but he has also opened up the possibilities for fluent Japanese-speakers from around the world breaking into the entertainment and other industries in Japan. Given his mixed-race background, he has also become a symbol for the acceptance of a more multiethnic society for 21st-century Japan…

For more information, click here.

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Mixed emotions: The multiracial student experience at UC Berkeley

Posted in Articles, Campus Life, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States on 2011-01-09 13:04Z by Steven

Mixed emotions: The multiracial student experience at UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley News
University of California, Berkeley
2005-03-07

Bonnie Azab Powell, NewsCenter

BERKELEY – “What are you?”

That’s the question Robert Allen, adjunct professor of African American Studies and Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley, writes on the chalkboard when students first file in for his “People of Mixed Racial Descent” class. It’s also the question that complete strangers have asked Ai-Ling Malone, a third-year business administration and economics major, all her life; Ai-Ling, whose mom is Chinese and whose dad is African-American, says it has never bothered her. Josh Fisher (Chinese and white), an environmental sciences Ph.D. student, almost never hears it. Third-year industrial engineering major Rey Andrew Perocho Doctora (Filipino and Chinese/Japanese) mostly hears it only from Asian people: “I have Chinese eyes but my skin is dark, so they find it hard to figure me out.”…

…At UC Berkeley, an eye-opening 22.9 percent of all respondents identified themselves as “multi-racial or multi-ethnic” on the 2004 UC Undergraduate Experience Survey. Across the UC system, the average was 25.8 percent. Thanks to the growing numbers of mixed young people, a journey that often begins in college as a personal quest for identity is starting to gather force as a political movement.

It’s a movement still in its infancy, however. The “What are you?” question aside, “mixed” students like Ai-Ling, Josh, Rey, and Amina are struggling with the same question – “Who am I?” – as their monoracial classmates. The difference is, they can face racism on two fronts: both from white-dominated society and, more upsettingly, from their own racial peer groups, for whom they are not “black enough” or “Asian enough.”…

…Much of the academic research on the mixed-race community began at Berkeley. The “People of Mixed Racial Descent” class was the first of its kind in the nation. It was started in 1980 by Terry Wilson, a Berkeley professor of Native American Studies and the son of a Potawatomi Indian father and a white mother. Several of the course’s early teachers, like Ph.D. student Cynthia Nakashima, have gone on to write landmark texts about the multiracial experience.

The class is even more heavily subscribed now. “For many of the students it’s the first chance they’ve had to talk about their experience in a supportive environment,” says Allen. When he teaches the class – alternating with African-American Studies chair Stephen Small – he emphasizes the artificiality of the idea of race, reminding students that it has no scientific basis. In 1998 the Anthropological Association of America actually released a formal statement to that effect: “Evidence from the analysis of genetics (e.g., DNA) indicates that most physical variation, about 94 percent, lies within so-called racial groups.This means that there is greater variation within ‘racial’ groups than between them.”…

Read the entire article here.

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Mixed Race/Mixed Space in Media Culture & Militarized Zones

Posted in Arts, Live Events, New Media, United States on 2010-08-23 22:06Z by Steven

Mixed Race/Mixed Space in Media Culture & Militarized Zones

Thursday Afternoon Forum Series
University of California, Berkeley
691 Barrows Hall
2010-10-07, 16:00 to 17:30 PDT (Local Time)

A Critical Race Theory Approach to Understanding Cinematic Representations of the Mixed Race Experience
Kevin Escudero
, Ethnic Studies

This presentation focuses on the developmental trajectory of the portrayal of mixed race people in mainstream media.  Primarily looking at film, but also analyzing other media texts such as photography, stand-up comedy and particular sub-genres of film (Disney, television series, etc.) this presentation seeks to understand the ways in which different forms of media have portrayed mixed race people pre and post-Loving.  While much work has been done on the depiction of mixed race people in media post-Loving, there is a need for such work to be contextualized within the pre-Loving depictions of mixed race.  Furthermore, very little attention has been given to the ways in which pre-1967 depictions of mixed race characters (e.g. the tragic mulatto) oftentimes reflect as well as perpetuated racist stereotypes of mixed race people.  These depictions of mixed race people during the anti-miscegenation era are what I argue, has given rise to the utilization by mixed race people of multiple forms of self-expression available through various media in the post-Loving era. 

Using a framework of “neutralizing the Other” in combination with a Critical Race Theory analysis I will also examine the ways in which post-1967 depictions of mixed race people in media have resulted in a neutralizing of the pre-1967 “threat” of miscegenation and the resulting mixed race offspring of these marriages.  Using pre-1967 depictions as a backdrop for post-Loving discourse, this paper also comments as to the self-perception and self-representation of mixed race youth today in film.  In this analysis, other forms of marginalization and subordination are prevalent, specifically gender.  Not to be overlooked in mixed race and miscegenation discourse, women of color are more often than not depicted as hypersexualized, super-fertile beings while mixed race men depending on their racial mixture are depicted as either hyper-masculine beings (Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Vin Deisel) or associated with a more effeminate masculinity (e.g. Keanu Reeves who is half Asian and half Caucassian).  Tiger Woods, on the other hand, and the media portrayal of his marriage scandal at the end of 2009, has been cast as the ultimate playboy among men.

Historical Development and Expression of Black-Okinawa: Mixed-Socio-Cultural Race/Space in Militarized Zone
Ariko Ikehara, Ethnic Studies

This paper examines the historicity of the Cold War and the Post-Cold War era and the narrativity of its aftermath in which the legacy and memories of the U.S.-Asia border (militarized Asia space) are apprehended, narrated and remembered from a transpacific gaze: mixed-space/race zone in the U.S. militarized Asia.   Thus, this project seeks to map out a genealogy of mixed-space/race in the U.S. militarized Asia zone in the historical context of the Cold War and Post-Cold War era.  Re-examining the “natural” phases of social-geographical expansion/spatial development brought on by the militarization of Asia during the Cold war and Post-Cold war era in Asia, my main focus is couched in the base cultural space (mixed-space) in Okinawa.  Some of the research questions are: what is the structure that maintains and fuels the military complex in Asia, what forms did the militarized place become mixed-space, and what are the different circumstances in which the mixed-race people (Amerasians) with or without mixed families traverse and move in and out and around (circulation) of the militarized Asia zone.  Centering the black-Amerasian history and narrativity as the loci of inquiry, I am particularly interested in exploring how the notion of “blackness” is apprehended, circulated, and performed in the mixed-space/race, and is reiterated over and again within the larger spatiality of transnational sites in between US and Asia.

For more information, click here.

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