I Color Myself Different

Posted in Autobiography, Books, Forthcoming Media, Identity Development/Psychology, Monographs, United States on 2021-07-16 14:57Z by Steven

I Color Myself Different

Scholastic
2022-04-05
40 pages
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1338789621

Colin Kaepernick, Eric Wilkerson (Illustrator)

An inspiring story of identity and self-esteem from celebrated athlete and activist Colin Kaepernick.

When Colin Kaepernick was five years old, he was given a simple school assignment: draw a picture of yourself and your family. What young Colin does next with his brown crayon changes his whole world and worldview, providing a valuable lesson on embracing and celebrating his Black identity through the power of radical self-love and knowing your inherent worth.

I Color Myself Different is a joyful ode to Black and Brown lives based on real events in young Colin’s life that is perfect for every reader’s bookshelf. It’s a story of self-discovery, staying true to one’s self, and advocating for change… even when you’re very little!

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The Colors of Love: Multiracial People in Interracial Relationships

Posted in Books, Forthcoming Media, Identity Development/Psychology, Monographs, Social Science, United States on 2021-07-14 18:09Z by Steven

The Colors of Love: Multiracial People in Interracial Relationships

New York University Press
December 2021
320 Pages
24 b/w illustrations
6.00 x 9.00 x 0.00 in
Paperback ISBN: 9781479802418
Hardcover ISBN: 9781479802401
eBook ISBN: 9781479802425

Melinda A. Mills, Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies, Sociology, and Anthropology; Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies
Castleton University, Castleton, Vermont

How multiracial people navigate the complexities of race and love

In the United States, more than seven million people claim to be multiracial, or have racially mixed heritage, parentage, or ancestry. In The Colors of Love, Melinda A. Mills explores how multiracial people navigate their complex—and often misunderstood—identities in romantic relationships.

Drawing on sixty interviews with multiracial people in interracial relationships, Mills explores how people define and assert their racial identities both on their own and with their partners. She shows us how similarities and differences in identity, skin color, and racial composition shape how multiracial people choose, experience, and navigate love.

Mills highlights the unexpected ways in which multiracial individuals choose to both support and subvert the borders of race as individuals and as romantic partners. The Colors of Love broadens our understanding about race and love in the twenty-first century.

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Dr. Maria Root reads Bill of Rights for Mixed Heritage on Loving Day

Posted in Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, United States, Videos on 2021-07-09 02:37Z by Steven

Dr. Maria Root reads Bill of Rights for Mixed Heritage on Loving Day

Multiracial Americans
2021-07-03

For the first time ever, Dr. Maria Root reads her Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage on video. MASC presented an online Loving Day event June 2021. Loving Day celebrates the 1967 US Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage in all 50 states. Since then mixed marriages and the multiracial population has grown. In 1993 Dr. Maria Root created the Bill of Rights to affirm mixed race identity.

Watch the video here.

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Validation of the Multiracial Youth Socialization (MY-Soc) Scale among racially diverse multiracial emerging adults.

Posted in Articles, Family/Parenting, Identity Development/Psychology, Social Work, United States on 2021-06-07 01:42Z by Steven

Validation of the Multiracial Youth Socialization (MY-Soc) Scale among racially diverse multiracial emerging adults.

Journal of Family Psychology
Published online: 2021-05-31
DOI: 10.1037/fam0000879

Annabelle L. Atkin, PhD, Postdoctoral Scholar
T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics
Arizona State University

Hyung Chol Yoo, Associate Professor of Psychology
Arizona State University

Rebecca M. B. White, Associate Professor of Family and Human Development
Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics
Arizona State University

Alisia G. T. T. Tran, Assistant Professor in the Counseling and Counseling Psychology Program
Arizona State University

Kelly F. Jackson, Associate Professor of Social Work
Arizona State University

Multiracial children are the largest demographic group in the United States among individuals under the age of 18 (Pew Research Center, 2015), but their developmental processes are understudied. Parents and caregivers play an important role in preparing youth to navigate racialized society by teaching them to understand what it means to be a member of a racial-ethnic group (Hughes et al., 2006). However, this process is more complex in multiracial families, where youth belong to multiple racial-ethnic groups. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to develop and validate the first measure of racial-ethnic socialization for Multiracial youth, the Multiracial Youth Socialization (MY-Soc) Scale, to assess the unique messages that are communicated in multiracial families regarding topics of race, ethnicity, and culture. Using a sample of 901 Multiracial emerging adults (mage = 22.43), we separately captured the socialization practices of two of the youths’ primary caregivers from the youths’ perspective. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 62-item scale measuring eight types of socialization: Navigating Multiple Heritages Socialization, Multiracial Identity Socialization, Preparation for Monoracism Socialization, Negative Socialization, Colorblind Socialization, Diversity Appreciation Socialization, Race-Conscious Socialization, and Silent Socialization. The MY-Soc Scale was also supported by validity and reliability tests. This study contributes an important tool for scholars and practitioners to learn which racial-ethnic socialization messages are promotive for Multiracial youth development in different contexts.

Read or purchase the article here.

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Mixed-Race? Black-Asian? Blasian? A Qualitative Study

Posted in Asian Diaspora, Identity Development/Psychology, Social Science, United States, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2021-05-24 17:35Z by Steven

Mixed-Race? Black-Asian? Blasian? A Qualitative Study

2021-05-23

Ayumi Matsuda Rivero, Ph.D. Candidate in Sociology
University of California, San Diego

I am a multiracial Latinx-Asian doing research on the unique experiences of multiracial Black-Asians.

I am exploring how these individuals navigate and negotiate their ethnic and racial identity in predominantly white, Black, and Asian spaces. The first part of my research involves a short survey followed by interviews via Zoom. To be eligible for the study participants must either identify as multiracial Black-Asians or have parents who identify as Black and Asian.

If you decide to participate in this study, you will be interviewed on subjects that include:

  1. your racial and ethnic identity,
  2. the racial and ethnic identity of your family,
  3. your earliest memories of race/ethnicity,
  4. explicit/implicit messages you received about race by family and by others such as teachers, friends, communities, etc.,
  5. experiences of differential treatment based on race/gender,
  6. perceptions of race/gender stereotypes, and
  7. when you feel one or more of your identities most strongly. This completely voluntary, and your personal identifiers will be anonymized.

If you’d like to participate or have any questions about the study, please contact me directly at aematsud@ucsd.edu.

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“I wish I didn’t look so White”: examining contested racial identities in second-generation Black–White Multiracials

Posted in Articles, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Social Justice, United States on 2021-05-06 14:36Z by Steven

“I wish I didn’t look so White”: examining contested racial identities in second-generation Black–White Multiracials

Ethnic and Racial Studies
Published online: 2020-11-05
DOI: 10.1080/01419870.2020.1841256

Haley Pilgrim
Department of Sociology
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Multiracials are one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. However, we are still learning how the children of Multiracial individuals understand their racial identity. I interviewed 30 “second-generation” Black–White Multiracials, who have one Black–White parent and one White parent, on the meanings they assign to racial categories, phenotypes, and their racial identity. Many cite reflected appraisals as non-Black for why they do not identify as Black, but orientation toward Blackness differs from those who identify as Multiracial. Between these two groups of Multiracials, I find distinctive responses to racial contestation consistent with differing stigmatization of racial groups, salience of racial identity, and identification as a person of colour. These findings indicate differing responses to similarly reflected appraisals and highlight the need to investigate Multiracials of multiple generational statuses to understand the varying meanings of a Multiracial identity to Multiracials.

Read or purchase the article here.

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Natalie Morris: “Ideas of mixedness are binary and centred around whiteness”

Posted in Articles, Autobiography, Identity Development/Psychology, Interviews, Media Archive, United Kingdom on 2021-04-19 17:36Z by Steven

Natalie Morris: “Ideas of mixedness are binary and centred around whiteness”

Substack
2021-04-19

Isabella Silvers

Hi, welcome back to Mixed Messages! This week I’m speaking to journalist and author Natalie Morris, who is of Jamaican and white British heritage. I first came across Natalie with Mixed Up, a series on Metro exploring the nuances of mixed identity. Continuing this vital conversation, Natalie has just released her first book, Mixed/Other: Explorations of Multiraciality in Modern Britain. Read on to hear Natalie share her own experiences, plus what she hopes everyone can take from her important work.

The author of Mixed/Other on the duality of holding two truths simultaneously and the isolation of being mixed

How do you define your ethnicity?

My dad’s family is Jamaican and my mum is white British, so I say I say mixed or mixed and Black. I’m trying to move away from ‘mixed-race’ as it implies a kind of essentialism.

The terminology changes and develops, which is good, but it can be tricky to keep up with that. There’s no wrong or right way to describe yourself, but it’s important to be open to those changes. It’s important that people also listen to what mixed people want – so many things are forced on you when you’re mixed, and it can be hard to push back against that…

Read the entire interview here.

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Rebecca Carroll: “Surviving the White Gaze” & Transracial Adoption | The Daily Social Distancing Show

Posted in Autobiography, Identity Development/Psychology, Interviews, Media Archive, United States, Videos, Women on 2021-04-18 17:50Z by Steven

Rebecca Carroll: “Surviving the White Gaze” & Transracial Adoption | The Daily Social Distancing Show

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah
2021-03-17

Rebecca Carroll discusses her new memoir that examines transracial adoption and forging her own Black identity.

Watch the video here.

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Mixed/Other: Explorations of Multiraciality in Modern Britain

Posted in Autobiography, Books, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Monographs, Passing, Social Science, United Kingdom on 2021-04-03 15:38Z by Steven

Mixed/Other: Explorations of Multiraciality in Modern Britain

Trapeze
2021-04-15
240 pages
eBook ISBN-13: 978140919716
Hardcover ISBN-13: 9781409197140
Audiobook ISBN-13: 9781409197225

Natalie Morris

An exploration of what it means to be mixed race in the UK today.

  • How does it feel when your heritage isn’t listed as an option on an identification form?
  • What is it like to grow up as the only person in your family who looks like you?
  • Where do you belong if you are simultaneously seen as being ‘too much’ of one race and ‘not enough’ of another to fit neatly into society’s expectations?

The mixed population is the fastest-growing group in the U.K. today, but the mainstream conversation around mixedness is stilted, repetitive and often problematic. At a time when ethnically ambiguous models fill our Instagram feeds and our high street shop windows, and when children of interracial relationships are lauded as heralding in the dawn of a post-racial utopia, journalist Natalie Morris takes a deep dive into what it really means to be mixed in Britain today.

From blackfishing to the fetishisation of mixed babies; from the complexities of passing and code-switching to navigating the world of work and dating, Natalie explores the ways in which all of these issues uniquely impact those of mixed heritage. Drawing from a wealth of research, interviews and her own personal experiences, in Mixed/Other, Natalie’s aims to dismantle the stereotypes that have plagued mixed people for generations and to amplify the voices of mixed Britons today, shining a light on the struggles and the joys that come with being mixed.

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How do multiracial people inhabit space when we don’t tick a box?

Posted in Census/Demographics, Identity Development/Psychology, Media Archive, Wanted/Research Requests/Call for Papers on 2021-03-22 19:54Z by Steven

How do multiracial people inhabit space when we don’t tick a box?

2021-03-22

Syriah Bailey

I am a multiracial person writing a dissertation exploring the role of national censuses and monitoring forms in tracking multiracial people who are two or more minority races/ethnicities.

My research looks at those who typically select “mixed other” or “any other mixed background” in forms and how we as multiracial people inhabit space when we do not fit inside a tick box.

The first component of the research is a survey open to people of all ages, genders and locations here.

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